Author Topic: Festool Basics :-)  (Read 17204 times)

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Offline nico

  • Posts: 94
Festool Basics :-)
« on: March 07, 2011, 03:22 PM »

Being a Weekend Warrior, not a pro what Festool product does one need to have?
and what other none Festool product do you need to be one of the first purchases?
And I mean "basics" I'm very curious about your suggestions ?
 
kr
 
Nico
 
FYI (I already have a screwdriver, nails , screws ... :-))

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 03:57 PM »
Hi,


TS55 and guide rails.   Adding a CT would be good but any other vac would work for starters.


Seth

Offline vkumar

  • Posts: 359
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 04:01 PM »
Nico

Assuming you have no tools, and depending on what you want to do and your budget I would recommend the following:

1. Cordless drill (nice to have a Festool, but any good brand will be fine)
2. TS 55 saw with rail long enough to do the type of cutting you might encounter/ Festool bundles in a 1400 which might be a good start.
3. RO 90 sander
4.MFT/3 with 2 quick release clamps
5. A 1400 or 1010 router with a few router bits

I think this should be sufficient to start.  You will find out more as you do projects and fins out what you need.

Vijay
Vijay Kumar

Offline Jack Parks

  • Posts: 34
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2011, 05:16 PM »
Nico,

What you need to purchase first will greatly depend on what kind of woodworking you want to do but a TS55 and vacumn would be a good start.  Another tool I use all the time is a Kreg pocket hole jig.

Tell us what you plan to build and your budget and it will help others give you good advice.

Offline kdzito

  • Posts: 322
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2011, 05:32 PM »
It depends on the projects you are doing and if you do not own any Festools yet this is a good start:


1. CT 26 or CT 36

2. TS 55 note: comes with guide rail FS 1400

3. MFT/3, with clamping elements and quick clamps. note: comes with guide rail  FS 1080

4. Parallel Guides, if I would of known about them when I first bought the TS 55 they would of saved me a lot of headaches.  Once again this is my IMHO.

5. RO 90, 125, or 150.  Depending on your sanding requirements and if your not going to strip finishes by sanding nor polish metal and paint finishes, I would get the ETS 150/3. 

6. OF 1400; however, if you already have a router and any router bits don't make this one your priority as IMHO you can get by without a Festool router until later on and more $$$$ to spend.

7. T series cordless drills; however, the same as the router.

8. WCR 1000, although it was just released and mine is forthcoming this week I can't really comment from personal experience; however, this item really caught my eye since I have a limited space to sit my tools and consumables nearby while I work away.  I sit all of my tools under, on top of, and near the MFT and CT which creates more clutter and causes me to spend more time than I can stand by moving one to get to another and undoubtedly so I eye the Workcenter to be my sanctuary and give me the peace of mind in maintaining a sense of organization.     

This should take care you in a great collection of Festools.



 
Building one day at a time.

Offline nico

  • Posts: 94
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 03:17 PM »
Ok ,
we bought an old house.
The original owners build a very beautiful house,  but the next owners  let it deteriorate and "modernised" it in a cheap ugly way.
My wife and I did most of the rebuilding ourselves (spend a huge amount of time to restore it in the original way)
and I must say that we are both very proud of the result we've achived up to now, but we still have some work to do.

the projects:
*Renovation of the staircase (New England style ( have no other way of explaining it) , it is a very nice stair but in a poor condition;  remove paint... fill up some holes....I think I even have to replace one stair tread )
*1 built-in wardrobe that is about 4 meter width  and 2  meter height
*1 built-in cupboard  ( 6 meter width below a sloped roof)
*Build a porch  ((3, 5 meter width , 7 meter length ) the original wooden structure is demolished and was replaced by an ugly " thing" :-)
*Build a garden shed
*Make some garden funiture / childrens toys

I already own:
1 TS 55 and 2 rails 1400 (it was a Festool promotion and I love it , best money ever spend)
1 OF 1010
1 Domino (purchased  it second hand ...)
1 Bosch miter saw (old one, but works fine)
so what are the tools that you guys recommend to this very motivated weekend warrior who loves the smell of fresly sawn timber in the morning ;-)))
and please do consider that I'm not a pro ... this means that my budget is not infinite

kr
Nico
(and I'm sorry for my poor English)

Offline cnewport

  • Posts: 49
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 03:30 PM »
Nico,

I don't see a sander on your list - a rotex will definitely help with any renovation project involving removing old paint or finishes.  If you have drywall I use my 150/3 and CT26 to sand small drywall jobs around the house - the noise and dust are so minimal that I did this while the wife was cooking and the 1 & 4 year olds were playing!  The drills are also brilliant - I'd see if you could get a deal on a discontinued C12.  The one tool I use more than any other is the MFT/3.

So based on your existing tool list, if I were in your shoes, I'd look for:

1. Rotex - size depending on jobs planned
2. Vac - one of the smaller ones - the 36 is really big for a homeowner
3. MFT/3
4. Drill
5. 150/3
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 03:33 PM by cnewport »

Offline kdzito

  • Posts: 322
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2011, 03:35 PM »
Nico,

I don't see a sander on your list - a rotex will definitely help with any renovation project involving removing old paint or finishes.  If you have drywall I use my 150/3 and CT26 to sand small drywall jobs around the house - the noise and dust are so minimal that I did this while the wife was cooking and the 1 & 4 year olds were playing!  The drills are also brilliant - I'd see if you could get a deal on a discontinued C12.  The one tool I use more than any other is the MFT/3.

So based on your existing tool list, if I were in your shoes, I'd look for:

1. Rotex - size depending on jobs planned
2. Vac - one of the smaller ones - the 36 is really big for a homeowner
3. MFT/3
4. Drill
5. 150/3

Ditto on the sander.
Building one day at a time.

Offline nico

  • Posts: 94
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 04:02 PM »
Cnewport and Kdzito:
Thanks for the quick reply but regarding the sander
all the drywallling is already done , sanding is done (my wife and I used a huge amount of of elbow grease) even the painting is finished .
that project is done.
I think I need a sander for the stairs but which one ? a RO 90 ? (a staircase has many corners)
and what do you guys suggest for my other projects?

Nico
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 04:10 PM by nico »

Offline cnewport

  • Posts: 49
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2011, 04:15 PM »
For the stairs the 125 will get the treads and risers done faster but the 90 has the delta attachment for the corners.... I'd probably pick the 90.

These projects would benefit from:

*1 built-in wardrobe: parallel guides
*1 built-in cupboard: parallel guides
*Build a porch: a nice long rail to do the edges
*Build a garden shed: drill

Offline b_m_hart

  • Posts: 413
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2011, 04:17 PM »
Cnewport and Kdzito:
Thanks for the quick reply but regarding the sander
all the drywallling is already done , sanding is done (my wife and I used a huge amount of of elbow grease) even the painting is finished .
that project is done.
I think I need a sander for the stairs but which one ? RO 90 (a staircase has many corners)
and what do you guys suggest for my other projects?

Nico

The RO 90 will be nice for the corners, but don't you think you'll want a bigger pad for sanding the rest of the area?  Go with either the ETS 150/3 or Rotex 150 in my opinion.  I have both, and they'll both work well for that, assuming you have the patience to do that much work without a specialized floor sander.  If you are planning on building a deck and shed, it might be helpful to have a good drill/screwdriver.  I'm assuming you have one already, but the C15 is a nice machine, lots of power if you need to do some drilling (or even mixing mortar or some concrete mixes).  

Given that you still have a fair amount of finish work (the built in and cupboard, for example), a MFT/3 might make good sense for you.  It's great for breaking down sheet goods, and is super convenient to glue up / assemble on.  Plus, you can fold it up and put it in a closet when you aren't using it - very handy.  Finally, get a vacuum.  I'd go with the Midi or CT26.  I have a Midi, and it's worked fine for me with the domino, TS55, and OF1010.

So, to recap:

1) rent a floor sander, or buy a RO90 and ETS150/3 or RO150
2) C15
3) MFT/3
4) CT Midi or CT26

Offline DScott

  • Posts: 43
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2011, 05:42 PM »
Tools are covered by everyone else, so I'll just say your English is fine...and pictures, we like pictures. [smile]
Once a Marine always a Marine

Offline Don T

  • Posts: 1817
  • Phoenix, Az
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2011, 07:35 PM »
I agree with everyone else about what to buy first but the truth is you are starting down a very slippery slope and you will become addicted like the rest of us.  You will enjoy using all of these tools

Don
RO150, C12, DF 500 Q, CT33, TS75, MFT3, Kapex 120, MFT3/Kapex, MFK 700, RO 90, ETS150/3, CT22, Centrotec Installers Kit, Parallel Guides & Ext, Carvex, OF1400, LR32 Set, MFS400 w/700 rails, KA UG Set, First Aid Kit, RTS 400 EQ, Vecturo OS400 Set, CT Wings, CT Drill Guide, Pro 5, CXS, C18, HL850, Vac Sys set

Offline nico

  • Posts: 94
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2011, 09:05 AM »
Thanks for the replies
and It seems that you are all fans of the mft , but wouldn't a small table saw ( like the DW 745, or something similar)
better for my kind of jobs ?


Nico
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 09:08 AM by nico »

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3529
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2011, 10:51 AM »
Thanks for the replies
and It seems that you are all fans of the mft , but wouldn't a small table saw ( like the DW 745, or something similar)
better for my kind of jobs ?

Yes, I believe that a (small) table saw is invaluable for ripping boards, and cross cutting small pieces. These saws are not good for accurately breaking down sheet goods your TS 55 is much better for that. As has been mentioned a good dust collection machine (Midi or CT26) would be a good idea, particularly because (I assume) you are working and living in the the house and breathing that dust all day and night is not good for your health. I suggest you also consider getting a good jigsaw...I heard Festool is coming out with a new one that kicks ! [big grin]

To accomplish the tasks on your list, here are my comments on what tools you might need in addition to the ones you already own:

*Renovation of the staircase (New England style) - I have no idea what this and what materials you are using but you could use the TS 55 you have, a router for the edge etc. and maybe a jigsaw to fit a new tread in place

*1 built-in wardrobe that is about 4 meter width  and 2  meter height - use your TS55 to break down sheet goods, a table MFT or homemade permanent table (if you have space) for cutting and assembly and depending on the style (euro etc.) and material (Melamine, veneer, plywood etc.) used for assembly a drill, Domino, router, table saw, sander and jigsaw.

*1 built-in cupboard  ( 6 meter width below a sloped roof) - Same as above.

*Build a porch  ((3, 5 meter width , 7 meter length ) - Depending on construction type a Table saw to rip boards, drill, jigaw ladders, levels, etc.
*Build a garden shed - depending on the materials used - a table saw, jigsaw, drill hammer nails, screws, ladder, level
*Make some garden funiture / childrens toys - a table saw with an accurate fence, Jigsaw, sander, router and drill.

Good luck.
Tim

Offline fdengel

  • Posts: 854
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2011, 11:20 AM »
If you don't have a Festool dust extractor, you have no idea what you're missing.

+1 to the Rotex, AFTER the dust extractor...


What's a table saw?  I've never used one...  quite happy about that, too.   [laughing]


Offline nico

  • Posts: 94
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2011, 07:25 PM »
So ,
what would be the best money spend?
MFT or table saw?
difficult ...

Nico

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3529
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2011, 07:34 PM »
So ,
what would be the best money spend?
MFT or table saw?
difficult ...

Nico


If you have room for a fixed table, build one, and then buy a table saw. You can work with out a table saw, but why should you. Remember even Festool makes a table to convert the TS55 and TS75.
Tim

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5268
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2011, 12:00 PM »
Small TS
MFT with associated clamps.
MFT table extension/ build a out feed table or buy 2 MFTs like I did.
compressor
15 ga / 18 ga nail guns
cordless impact gun/driver
good set of chisels
Sliding Compund Miter saw/ Kapex

Offline Grinding One

  • Posts: 40
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2011, 04:19 PM »
Ok ,
we bought an old house.
The original owners build a very beautiful house,  but the next owners  let it deteriorate and "modernised" it in a cheap ugly way.
My wife and I did most of the rebuilding ourselves (spend a huge amount of time to restore it in the original way)
and I must say that we are both very proud of the result we've achived up to now, but we still have some work to do.

the projects:
*Renovation of the staircase (New England style ( have no other way of explaining it) , it is a very nice stair but in a poor condition;  remove paint... fill up some holes....I think I even have to replace one stair tread )
*1 built-in wardrobe that is about 4 meter width  and 2  meter height
*1 built-in cupboard  ( 6 meter width below a sloped roof)
*Build a porch  ((3, 5 meter width , 7 meter length ) the original wooden structure is demolished and was replaced by an ugly " thing" :-)
*Build a garden shed
*Make some garden funiture / childrens toys

I already own:
1 TS 55 and 2 rails 1400 (it was a Festool promotion and I love it , best money ever spend)
1 OF 1010
1 Domino (purchased  it second hand ...)
1 Bosch miter saw (old one, but works fine)
so what are the tools that you guys recommend to this very motivated weekend warrior who loves the smell of fresly sawn timber in the morning ;-)))
and please do consider that I'm not a pro ... this means that my budget is not infinite

kr
Nico
(and I'm sorry for my poor English)


What you are going to need in the future is Wood,so I would buy wood.The price of it is going thru the roof faster then the tool prices.Just listen to the guys on here and they are all tearing thru wood as fast as they get it.You could be a wood broker soon if you would just buy Wood.
How many tools are enough

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2197
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2011, 03:46 PM »
Plus1 on what Tim has posted. If you're living in a house while you work on renovating it, dust collection to prevent troubles to your health and that of your family is important. Once you buy the dust extractor, then any Festool or OTHER tool that has a dust port that works with the hose sizes offered by Festool and others can be easily tamed to make your life better, less stressed.  Sander, plus one on the Rotex 90 DX. You're getting several sanders here in one package, so it's a great value even though it's smaller than its bigger brothers. Stairs don't need a large sander if you've got time, and it already sounds like you've done that with hand tools or hand sanding.
Having a powered sander, with EXCELLENT dust extraction will not only speed up the process, you've save on abrasive costs since you won't clog the sandpaper with crud like you would with just hand sanding. So you save several different ways.
 While a table saw is nice, you already have a handheld power saw and guides. You would have to be the one to decide if that is your next large power tool purchase. [cool]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Eli

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    • Metafizix
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2011, 06:51 AM »
Yeah, CT22 or new, vac first. Then MFT. Nevermind the tablesaw.
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Chris™

  • Posts: 12
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2011, 05:23 PM »
Staircase: Remove paint with heat gun and scraper.

                 To replace the tread you need to access the underside and remove the wedges. then just remove the damaged tread   
                 cut a replacement tread and wedges. (hammer, chisel, router to make bullnose on tread, cramps to laminate timber                         
                 for tread and plane to tidy up.)

As for the other projects I don't see anything power tools you need other than a sander. The money you would spend on a festool sander/vac/table saw could be invested in cheaper tools and better finishes for your projects i.e quality paint for your staircase;  nice ironmongery for your wardrobe/furniture or quality timber/glass for you porch depending on its size.

Don't get my wrong I am a carpenter by trade and use my Festools (amongst others) daily, they are great tools but buying a vac, sander and accessories is a lot of money for some DIY  [tongue]

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2011, 06:24 PM »
Chris,

Welcome to the forum.  [welcome].  Curious about the use of the trademarked symbol in your screen name.  Was that intentional?

Peter

Offline Chris™

  • Posts: 12
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2011, 07:27 PM »
Hey, I figured someone else would probably have Chris and I'm too tired today to think up a witty name so just trademarked it instead  [big grin]

Also going to post this because at first glance I thought he had a giant moustache  [scared]

Offline fisheye

  • Posts: 37
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #25 on: June 06, 2011, 06:32 PM »
I'm in a somewhat similar boat to you, old house, also refubishing a boat... and want to do some woodworking.  Strong second to the RO-150 (new purchase, way more useful than I imagined).  I bought a CT-36 intending to use it only in my small workshop, but have already hauled it to the boat (hard) and the house to do various jobs.  If I had to do it over, would probably get a CT-22.  The Midi and Mini have less performance than the CT series.  Given that I already have the big one, I'm already dreaming of a Mini down the road for my rambling tasks.  I still love the 36 when I'm in my "shop".  This weekend, I did some sanding with likely lead paint.  You still have to do the lead mitigation stuff, but it is MUCH easier having the small particles sucked into the HEPA-filtered CT machines.  The big stuff still falls to the floor, but the dust is non-existent.

Offline Jesse Cloud

  • Posts: 1722
  • Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2011, 09:00 PM »
Do you have layout tools - a square, a level, a good steel ruler, bevel gauge, protractor, a good tape, good pencils. etc?

Offline Kevin Stricker

  • Posts: 483
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2011, 09:31 AM »
There is a reason that the tablesaw is considered by most professionals to be the center of their shop.  In my opinion an MFT is a poor excuse for a cabinet saw and I have both.

I would suggest finding some used tools that you need as the job requires and adding to your Festool stable as you get jobs done.  A Rotex is a nice bit of kit but hardly essential, you can buy 2-3 Festool sanders for the same price.  A CT22/26 is a great vac but you can buy a really nice Fein for 1/2 the price.

Many of the people on the FOG loose sight of woodworking in their quest to own the best tools.  If I was in your shoes I would focus on owning the nicest home.  Besides a tablesaw, jigsaw, and a good cordless driver/drill I think you have plenty of power tools to do most home renovations.  You probably want at least a finish nailer and compressor if you don't already have them.  You need clamps and work supports if you don't already.  Most important you need accurate layout and measuring tools so you can produce quality.

Dust collectors are nice but hardly essential unless you are a professional.  heck if I had to guess I would say less than a quarter of the contractors in the states use anything but a shopvac for cleanup.  Remember that an old house is like an onion, you peel back layers and find other things that need to be done.  It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking you "NEED" that new toy/tool and spend your time and energy acquiring tools instead of working on your house.

Offline davee

  • Posts: 295
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #28 on: June 07, 2011, 10:40 AM »
Dust collectors are nice but hardly essential unless you are a professional.  heck if I had to guess I would say less than a quarter of the contractors in the states use anything but a shopvac for cleanup.  Remember that an old house is like an onion, you peel back layers and find other things that need to be done.  It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking you "NEED" that new toy/tool and spend your time and energy acquiring tools instead of working on your house.

I am not a professional woodworker, but I have purchased and completely remodelled several homes, the last being over 100 years old.  I found my allergies slowly growing worse over time until I figured out it was the dust from remodelling.  Dust control is one of the primary reasons I have as many Festools as I have.  I am considering replacing a radial arm saw that I've had for 30 years simply because it has such bad dust control.  Fein might be perfectly acceptable, but my old shopvac wasn't close to sufficient.   The CT26 is fantastic.

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3529
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #29 on: June 07, 2011, 11:01 AM »
There is a reason that the tablesaw is considered by most professionals to be the center of their shop.  In my opinion an MFT is a poor excuse for a cabinet saw and I have both.

I would suggest finding some used tools that you need as the job requires and adding to your Festool stable as you get jobs done.  A Rotex is a nice bit of kit but hardly essential, you can buy 2-3 Festool sanders for the same price.  A CT22/26 is a great vac but you can buy a really nice Fein for 1/2 the price.

Many of the people on the FOG loose sight of woodworking in their quest to own the best tools.  If I was in your shoes I would focus on owning the nicest home.  Besides a tablesaw, jigsaw, and a good cordless driver/drill I think you have plenty of power tools to do most home renovations.  You probably want at least a finish nailer and compressor if you don't already have them.  You need clamps and work supports if you don't already.  Most important you need accurate layout and measuring tools so you can produce quality.

Dust collectors are nice but hardly essential unless you are a professional.  heck if I had to guess I would say less than a quarter of the contractors in the states use anything but a shopvac for cleanup.  Remember that an old house is like an onion, you peel back layers and find other things that need to be done.  It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking you "NEED" that new toy/tool and spend your time and energy acquiring tools instead of working on your house.

I couldn't agree more Kevin, well other than dust control. A pro I know wish he had paid more attention to dust collection as his asthma continued to worsen contributing to his giving up on the trade. While this doesn't mean his existing condition wouldn't have gradually gotten worse, but I am sure it didn't help.

As a hobbyist/enthusiast if you want to own the best, Festool is right up there and woodworking is sometimes secondary. The tool is the art just as a the rarely driven Ferrari becomes.

Depends on your (conscious or unconscious) objectives I suppose.

I was always fascinated with the band saw my grandfather (dutch) built  from plans in popular mechanics. It had a plywood case. He would always say it's a poor craftsman that blames his tools, but then go to the hardware store and buy the best brushes available and tell whom ever was listening that he had to buy the best because he wasn't very good.

I have definitely inherited some of his tool buying traits other than being incredibly stubborn and a perfectionist.
Tim

Offline Kevin Stricker

  • Posts: 483
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2011, 02:48 PM »
I totally agree with you guys about the DC, I have 5 extractors and a cyclone.  You COULD just use a dust mask whenever woodworking though.  My point was that a $500 extractor is not necessary.  Unless you do a lot of site work a Fein vac will do just fine, and you can easily get by with a shopvac and tool activated switch.  I love my CT's for site work but would not recommend them to a hobbyist, they are after all just a very expensive vacuum.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline fdengel

  • Posts: 854
Re: Festool Basics :-)
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2011, 08:56 AM »
The adjustable suction on the CT's is essential for use with the sanders, and dust extraction while sanding improves the quality of the work.