Author Topic: Review/introduction to: Knipex CoBolt // compiled information  (Read 1627 times)

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Online six-point socket II

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Hi!

I was asked about some more information on the Knipex CoBolt "pocket" bolt-cutter by one of our dear FOG moderators  :) :) which I happily compiled.

It might be informative also for other FOG members that's why he suggested I start this thread.

So here's what I sent:

Quote

(...)

I have the 72 32 200 ( http://www.knipex.com/index.php?id=1216&L=1&page=art_detail&parentID=1367&groupID=1473&artID=20523 )

When I bought it there was no CoBolt XL (10" / 250) - So I didn't have a choice size wise, but still I would not get the XL because it's not available with a what Knipex translates as "Multi-Component"-Grip. Which is basically superior in all aspects to the simple "plasti dip" type handle. I would not recommend the latter - they're less comfortable, they hurt more when you apply real pressure on them, they are quite a bit more slippery. And reaching for the XL would (for me, anyway) translate to: I need to cut large diameter stuff regularly and often - and I think a real bolt cutter would be way better suited for that. The CoBolt is just like a SAK - it can cut a lot of different diameters and even piano wire up to 3.2 mm - but it's the pocket version of a bolt cutter. Doesn't mean it's not serious business - as you will see. :)

Next: angled or straight. Straight all the way for me. Why? I have never come across something where I would have needed a angled cutting head because whatever it was couldn't be cut with a straight head. And, I feel like you're giving up power/control with the angled head. But like I said, this comes purely from never needing a angled head. One thing maybe: If you need to cut something off flush, than the angled version would be superior

The notch/recess: It's both, heaven and heck. Heaven because it really does make cutting larger diameter and hard material easier, heck because, depending on the material/hardness it will not cut through. So if it's really hard material and cracks easily you can go through in one attempt, if it's rather soft and it bends before it cracks - you will have to re-place whatever you're cutting to the front portion of the head and cut through in a second attempt. You will see this in the video :)

As you found out already, all of them are high leverage diagonal cutters. :) I have honestly no idea what they mean by fencing in this context.

Lets start with my short picture/video review :)

Here's the video link: http://sendvid.com/5iw6fdtd

From 00:00 - 00:09 I'm trying to cut a 6mm machine screw (steel, galvanized and blue chromated) in the front portion of the head.

From 00:09 - 00:16 I switched to the notch/recess and cut it with significantly less force as you can see.

From 00:23 - 00:25 I pre-cut a 4mm (A2) Spax in the notch/recess

From 00:25 - 00:28 I finish the cut in the front portion of the head. (This is what I meant with rather soft stuff being "heck" in the notch/recess, it will not cut through)

From 00:29 - 00:32 I cut a typical framing/roofing nail

From 00:33 - 00:35 I cut another, smaller nail. Typical "does it all/ all-purpose household nail"

From 00:36 - 00:42 I cut another machine type screw, somewhere around 4mm.

From 00:43 - 00:59 I cut another typical wood/all-purpose screw, again because these are rather soft, you can see I need to change from notch/recess to front portion of the head. Of course you can prevent that by simply cutting in the front portion of the head and not using the notch/recess on rather soft material.

Pictures:

The 6mm machine type screw:



The Spax:



The "mess" I've made ;)



Jaw/cutting edge shot - as you can see, absolutely no dents in the edges. And this was of course used before. But you can also see that the notch/recess is quite serious in depth, which explains the "trouble" with softer materials.




So, I'd say you'd be best suited with the 72 32 200 I have :)

Hope this helps! :)

(...)


Some more information on the Knipex CoBolt XL (10" / 250) Version can be found here, it's pretty new: http://www.knipex.com/index.php?id=1216&L=1&page=group_detail&parentID=1367&groupID=2430

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 11:20 PM by six-point socket II »

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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Review/introduction to: Knipex CoBolt // compiled information
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 09:04 AM »
Thanks Oliver,

    There are a bunch of different models of these Cobolt cutters to sort through.

     I think there are probably a lot of items such as this that aren't exactly woodworking tools but may still be very useful for woodworking and related projects. Especially those that are in the home improvement DIY category. The focus on FOG tends to be on woodworking due to the nature of Festool tools but they certainly get used for many types of projects. I like to get info on tools that relate going the other direction as well.

     A small pair of bolt cutters could be very handy.

Seth
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 09:07 AM by SRSemenza »

Offline DrD

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Re: Review/introduction to: Knipex CoBolt // compiled information
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 09:19 AM »
@SRSemenza
Seth, are they available in the US?  WHere?  And how much do they cost?  Looks like something handy to have.

Thanks,

DrD
Dr.D

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Review/introduction to: Knipex CoBolt // compiled information
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 09:31 AM »
@SRSemenza
Seth, are they available in the US?  WHere?  And how much do they cost?  Looks like something handy to have.

Thanks,

DrD

   Ebay, Amazon, KCtool, Chadstoolbox,  Currently best price and 10% off at Chads.  But if you want free shipping Chads is slow.  Depending on the model $45 - $80. Differences -- grip style, spring /no spring, recess/ no recess, length 8" / 10", angled head.

Seth