Author Topic: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor  (Read 8960 times)

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Offline Shane Holland

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Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #30 on: September 26, 2018, 05:06 PM »
Toolnut still has a store?  I thought that they went to all internet sales.  @Shane Holland ?

@Peter Halle, yes, we still have a store that serves walk-in customers.  [wink]

And, we've sold a lot of these inflators. Dewalt has one now too.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 05:08 PM by Shane Holland »
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Offline Z48LT1

  • Posts: 78
  • My excuse is I never expected to be caught.
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #31 on: September 26, 2018, 06:36 PM »
My $.02US: the problem with ignoring the first TPMS warning is that the next thing that may happen is the rim ruining the tire when the tire actually loses all its pressure which can happen before you know it.  So I'm with Peter_C in reply 5 about having a 12V air compressor in each car to determine whether the TPMS warning is real or not immediately.  My choice is this $35 gem from Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/y8lztqod.  It has the Milwaukee compressor's feature of shutting off when the digitally set pressure limit is reached.  It is powered by a standard 12V cigar lighter type plug.  It does have a screw-on tire valve attachment but releases only a very brief "pffft" when unscrewed.  It's quiet and remarkably quick in topping off standard car tires; I haven't tried to inflate fully deflated tires or used it to top off truck tires.  Comes in a tidy zip-up vinyl bag with simple instructions and inflator adapters for the usual non tire inflatables.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 723
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #32 on: September 26, 2018, 10:41 PM »
Not long after this thread was started I bought a small Viair compressor for our little car. Also picked up a plug kit, and one of those small lunch boxes from Costco. The lunch box is pretty small and padded, so it holds the compressor, the plug kit tools needed, a few pairs of latex gloves, and two pairs of pliers, dikes and a pair of pliers to pull the screws/nails. Very compact, and because it uses the cars battery I never have to worry about swapping batteries, as it could be years before I use it. Compressor doesn't do any good if you don't have a battery with enough charge to fill a completely deflated tire.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ASY23I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Plug patches installed from the inside are a requirement in most states for tire shops, with plugs not being allowed. In all my years of experience with plugs I have seen them fail due to improper installation, causing a slow leak. Of course I have seen interior patches leak too. Flats tend to not happen very often with good quality tires and I am okay with plugging them myself and not driving on a mini spare.

FWIW always put a mini spare on the rear of the vehicle, and move the rear tire forward if need be. Has to do with braking and steering. How many people routinely check their mini spares to make sure they are at the recommend 60 psi?? Yeah some vehicles still come with full spares, but they are far and few between.

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1288
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #33 on: September 26, 2018, 11:39 PM »
On a related note, if you want a good plug kit to pair with your inflator, this is the ticket!  Between my neighbor and I, we have used 6-7 in the last 2 years.  Not a single leaky plug!  In his case, he usually tries with his auto store kit and one of two things happen.  The tool bends or the plug leaks before he gets the wheel back on the car.  If either of those happens, he calls me, I bring over the safety seal kit and in 10 minutes it’s all done, no leaks.  The plugs are better, the tools are better and the lube does help. 

https://www.amazon.com/Safety-Seal-KAP30-String-Storage/dp/B001DIECCK/ref=sr_1_4?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1538018776&sr=1-4&keywords=Safety+seal

The only negative is the reamer is on the large side, so you’ll need the wheel off the car to put your weight into it.  Forget about laying on your side and trying to plug a tire still on the car.
-Raj

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #34 on: September 27, 2018, 08:16 AM »
My wife recently had a screw in one of her tires.  Luckily it was a slow leak so she was able to just keep putting air in it until she could take it to the gas station down the street to be fixed.  The shop just used one of those plugs to fix the hole rather than a patch from the inside.  I guess I could have just bought a plug kit and essentially have done the same thing (though I've never done it before, but it seems pretty straight forward).  Obviously the plug is a lot easier and faster considering you often probably don't even have to take the wheel off of the car.

Are plugs really that dangerous?  It seems like plugs have been used for a long long time and only more recently (maybe past 15 -20years?) have I started hearing about these vulcanized patches that are applied from the inside.  Patches also seem like another upsell that a shop or store will force you to buy along with a nitrogen fill.

Does anyone have any recommendations for an inexpensive tire pressure gauge?  My wife wants one for her car after her recent leaking tire problem.  I have this Michelin: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00139YMUQ/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1 and it works fine.  I don't use or have a need for the programmable target pressure, but I know it works well just a little more expensive than others.  Anyone have any experience with either of these cheaper gauges:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07255XLG5/ref=ox_sc_act_title_4?smid=A3COC6SF6EGCHZ&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01J8DLGU2/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=A2NOFZGOKNP3PJ&psc=1

It doesn't look like the cheaper units specify their accuracy.  The Michelin says it's accuracy is "+/- 1% plus 0.5 PSI" - maybe it's really not that serious and does not even need to be that accurate as a few other posters have mentioned they're not overly concerned about tire pressures on a car.  I used to use those cheap stick gauges for the longest time and that seemed to be good enough also.
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Offline pixelated

  • Posts: 133
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2018, 03:17 PM »
I've been anxiously awaiting the DeWalt unit to become available, I have 4 battery systems already  [scared], and I don't need a 5th. Plus the DeWalt adds some versatility in that it can be powered from a tool battery or wall plug, or a vehicle battery.

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1288
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2018, 04:43 PM »
@GoingMyWay The patches are unlikely to leak since they are applied from the inside of the tire and the pressure of the air is effectively pushing it into the hole.  All other things equal, that would be my first preference.  But...

With the plug, you usually get a fixed size plug and have to ream the hole in the tire first, often expanding the hole (so the plug will fit) and abrading the inside of the hole to provide a little tooth for the plug to grab.  It can take a bit of force to jam the tool in there and ream it enough so the plug and other tool will fit.  I've had problems with cheaper plugs and tools and this method does run the risk of doing damage to the internal construction of the tire, though I've yet to see it myself. 

With quality plugs and tools, I can deal with it at home in 30 minutes and it never leaks again.  It costs me nothing over the initial investment in the plugs and tools.  With a patch, I have to take it to a shop, I'm at the mercy of their workload, at a minimum they have to take the tire off the wheel (or at least break the bead), reinstall and rebalance the tire (most shops will rebalance unless you ask them to mark the tire and wheel and reinstall in the same location).  Around me, low profile tires can run up to $30 or more for a mount and balance.  The cost is fine, but losing 90 minutes watching an 18 year old kid learning to use the tire machine and scratching my wheels isn't fun.  So, for convenience, I'll just plug it myself and move on. 
-Raj

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5160
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2018, 07:22 PM »
The cost is fine, but losing 90 minutes watching an 18 year old kid learning to use the tire machine and scratching my wheels isn't fun.

That’s funny...just had that experience myself last week.

Offline RustE

  • Posts: 342
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2018, 11:23 AM »
@GoingMyWay, I give people Milton S-921 or S-925 pencil gauges as gifts.  My next choices are the S-923 straight pencil gauge or the S-931 dial gauge.

I've owned some dial gauges in the past that were difficult to use because of their shallow head.  Basically you couldn't get the gauge aligned well before pushing it on the valve stem and frequently had leaks.  The S-923 straight pencil gauge is probably the easiest to align and use on automotive tires.

@RKA and @Cheese, had a young guy at a tire shop install the wrong shape of wheel weights.  The wheel weights were not sitting flush on the rim and probably would have flung off at some point.  Went back to get the problem fixed but they tried to tell me it was not a big deal.  After a conversation with the manager I got the correct wheel weights installed and a refund.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2199
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2018, 09:33 AM »
On a related note, if you want a good plug kit to pair with your inflator, this is the ticket!  Between my neighbor and I, we have used 6-7 in the last 2 years.  Not a single leaky plug!  In his case, he usually tries with his auto store kit and one of two things happen.  The tool bends or the plug leaks before he gets the wheel back on the car.  If either of those happens, he calls me, I bring over the safety seal kit and in 10 minutes it’s all done, no leaks.  The plugs are better, the tools are better and the lube does help. 

https://www.amazon.com/Safety-Seal-KAP30-String-Storage/dp/B001DIECCK/ref=sr_1_4?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1538018776&sr=1-4&keywords=Safety+seal

The only negative is the reamer is on the large side, so you’ll need the wheel off the car to put your weight into it.  Forget about laying on your side and trying to plug a tire still on the car.
   These ARE nice, we used to use them all the time at work, but then were required to switch to the Combo Patch/Plug repair pieces. I still have them, and generally I've never had one leak on me once installed, but a patch on the inside is preferred or even required now in many places.
 I save mine for when I'm on the road and getting to a shop or my work is not an option at the time.
 NAPA also sells a much better quality all metal reamer and install tool set than the small, plastic tools that commonly come with the inexpensive plug kits.
 You get a much more comfortable handle style to work with and more leverage.

 One bad caveat to installing Patches over a plug is the new style' Quiet Tires' that are around now. Basically a 1/4" to 3/16" thick layer of foam is installed on the inner tread/carcass side of the tire, glued with what appears to be a butyl rubber adhesive to the tire. Trying to hack through that and get a smooth, non-glued surface to apply a patch can be very time consuming. I know Continental Tires uses this as a option[ Conti Silent Tire ] and I suspect other tire makers could move to it if it catches on.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 250
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #40 on: October 09, 2018, 10:37 AM »
@GoingMyWay I caught a screw in my Subaru ~15k miles ago. Not wanting to replace all 4 tires (necessary for AWD vehicles), I put the spare on and drove home and got out my tire plug kit I keep for my motorcycle and plugged the tire and put it back on. Haven't had a problem since.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #41 on: October 09, 2018, 10:42 AM »
@GoingMyWay, I give people Milton S-921 or S-925 pencil gauges as gifts.  My next choices are the S-923 straight pencil gauge or the S-931 dial gauge.

I've owned some dial gauges in the past that were difficult to use because of their shallow head.  Basically you couldn't get the gauge aligned well before pushing it on the valve stem and frequently had leaks.  The S-923 straight pencil gauge is probably the easiest to align and use on automotive tires.

Thanks for those suggestions.  I ended up just buying the Michelin Gauge since she's familiar with using mine.

@GoingMyWay I caught a screw in my Subaru ~15k miles ago. Not wanting to replace all 4 tires (necessary for AWD vehicles), I put the spare on and drove home and got out my tire plug kit I keep for my motorcycle and plugged the tire and put it back on. Haven't had a problem since.

Yup, I think the plugs are pretty much as good as the patches in most situations.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline travisj

  • Posts: 232
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #42 on: November 24, 2018, 01:14 AM »
I came to this thread late, but I appreciate the review on the compressor.  I definitely see one of those in my future.  It would be ideal for the kids bikes, lawn tractor, etc...

A couple of comments

Nitrogen is much more stable than compressed air.  I know it had been available for passenger vehicles for quite some time, but it has been used in racing applications for quite awhile.  I know several drag racers (cars and bikes) that run it because it less susceptible to temperature effected pressure changes.

Aluminum wheels are notorious for not holding pressure.  The expansion, contraction, and corrosion rates are all significantly higher than steel.

I have installed several nitrogen generators in a previous career.  When I installed draught systems, if a bar would go through enough Guinness, it would be in their favor to install a generator and a mixing valve to get the proper 75% N to 25% CO2 ratio to push the liquid without over carbonating.  The ones we installed were based off of a normal-ish looking air compressor and ran $3-5k.  Since there is a small percentage of nitrogen in the atmosphere in general, they are designed to separate the nitrogen from the other gases in compressed air.  A capital expense for the bar that could be depreciated and quickly would offset the cost of running separate nitrogen tanks to mix with bulk CO2.  Same principal would work for a tire shop assuming they push enough Nitrogen to make it worth while.


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Offline wpz

  • Posts: 15
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #43 on: November 24, 2018, 07:09 AM »
Quote
Since there is a small percentage of nitrogen in the atmosphere in general, they are designed to separate the nitrogen from the other gases in compressed air.

Actually, about 78% of the earths atmosphere is nitrogen, so quite a large percentage.
This means the majority of gasses in compressed air is nitrogen already, you just need to get rid of the 21% oxygen and 1% other gasses.



Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5160
Re: Milwaukee 12V Compact Air Compressor
« Reply #44 on: November 24, 2018, 12:21 PM »
One more thing, adjust the pressures when the car is parked in the shade or garage.  I used to make a habit of adjusting them when the tires are cold, but found even if I drove the car 15 miles home, it really didn't increase the pressure more than 1-2 psi.  but if one side was exposed to the sun, the pressures on that side would increase up to 4 psi vs. the side in the shade.  If you set them all equal, that side will end up low when the tire temperatures normalize.

Ya I agree...I've made it a habit to adjust the tire pressures in the morning when the sun is still low on the horizon and the tires are all the same temperature.