Author Topic: Flush trim advice  (Read 981 times)

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Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 562
Flush trim advice
« on: November 05, 2018, 07:53 AM »
I used a few different flush trim bits so far. All on a single bottom bearing. My experience with flush trim bits (cheap ones) is that often the bearing will not hold long or will mar the bottom part. What is your preferred flush trim bit and single/double bearing?

I received this news letter..
 
.. from Infinity Cutting Tools and found the bits interesting. This is the first time I see a bit with that kind of pattern. Your thought?

Crazy thought: Since I don't have a router table yet, do you think I could use the Nova voyager drill press to flush trim boards?
Mario

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5730
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2018, 08:52 AM »
My flush trim bits I double up the bearings.

Tom

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 562
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2018, 08:53 AM »
My flush trim bits I double up the bearings.

Tom

Top & bottom or double bottom?

Is there any limitation to a top & bottom bearing bit?
Mario

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5730
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2018, 09:07 AM »
My flush trim bits I double up the bearings.

Tom

Top & bottom or double bottom?

Is there any limitation to a top & bottom bearing bit?

Double up the top. I've never seen a bit with the bottom hub long enough to accept two bearings.

Not that I know of. The real advantage is you only need one bit, instead of two (one top one bottom).

I do have some bits with top/bottom bearings. Odds are you'll only be running off one bearing at a time.

Tom

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5269
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2018, 11:05 AM »
I use infinity bits. But not the ones you show in the video.

But been very happy with them.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2511
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2018, 11:33 AM »
Max speed on the Nova drill press is 5000 rpm if you override the speed in the controls.  Router typically will run at 15000+  Cut quality may be a bit less and you might have an issue protecting the wood.  I'd definitely use a ply table on the press to protect the surface. 

A hand held router would likely be my preferred choice over either a router table or a drill press for using a flush trim bit I think unless the pieces are really narrow and short.  Tough to control a larger panel without an infeed and outfield stable.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 562
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2018, 11:36 AM »
I use infinity bits. But not the ones you show in the video.

But been very happy with them.

I think I`m going to give a try to the Infinity bit.  [big grin]

Max speed on the Nova drill press is 5000 rpm if you override the speed in the controls.  Router typically will run at 15000+  Cut quality may be a bit less and you might have an issue protecting the wood.  I'd definitely use a ply table on the press to protect the surface. 

A hand held router would likely be my preferred choice over either a router table or a drill press for using a flush trim bit I think unless the pieces are really narrow and short.  Tough to control a larger panel without an infeed and outfield stable.

Indeed, speed would be an issue  [crying].. but how cool it would be having a  ply-bed jig to trim boards with that DP  [wink]
Mario

Offline big K

  • Posts: 9
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2018, 07:27 AM »
The Infinity bits are their interpretation of the Whiteside ultimate flush trim bits. I am a dedicated user of Whiteside bits, but I will admit that these newer ones are a little pricy. However with that being said, their bit (WS) does a flawless job with no frayed edges or bearing print to deal with after. Plus Whiteside is an American company with production here in the states, and that means a lot to me.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 562
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2018, 09:12 AM »
The Infinity bits are their interpretation of the Whiteside ultimate flush trim bits. I am a dedicated user of Whiteside bits, but I will admit that these newer ones are a little pricy. However with that being said, their bit (WS) does a flawless job with no frayed edges or bearing print to deal with after. Plus Whiteside is an American company with production here in the states, and that means a lot to me.

I hear you. thank you for your inputs.

I had a look at the WS equivalent ($165CAD bottom bearing only) to the Infinity ($89CAD) ones and yes the price was a huge concern for a similar (look) product. Infinity have a similar one at $39CAD. one is more beefy not that it would make a big difference

I got to flush trim the top of the torsion box I am currently working on and used the LV straight flush trim bit. The bit made a very nice job but again the bearing made a print all the way. even with slight pressure. Perhaps the bearing is too tight? My understanding is that the bearing should not turn with the bit but with the mechanical action/direction you cut. Am I wrong?

Since I have several top to trim I ordered the infinity 1/2" x 2" and will give it a try next. Right now I'm working on an assembly/torsion box/outfeed table, next is a stand for the CNC with enclosure and finally a few rolling carts for power tools. Oh and a laminated drill press table  [big grin]
Mario

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1257
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2018, 09:33 AM »
Are you looking for a compression bit?  If you don't need a compression bit, a flush trim bit with the cutting edge skewed (whatever it's called) would be a lot less money and still give you a nice cut.  Sharpening it would be much easier as well.

One other thing to note about the infinity bits is the gullets under the cutting edge are bigger.  I was cutting a 3/4" circular plywood base with a circle cutting jig and used the whiteside compression bit.  It seemed like it was handling shaving 1/8" off the edge fine, but when I needed to bite off more it was better to take successive passes and sneak up on my line.  In some cases my freehand jigsaw cut was 5/8" from my final dimension, so it took a bit more time to gradually shave that off with the whiteside.  It was my first time using it though, I just went with my how the router felt when I tried to take a bigger bite.   
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 10:52 AM by RKA »
-Raj

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 562
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2018, 10:36 AM »
Are you looking for a compression bit?  If you don't need a compression bit, a flush trim bit with the cutting edge skewed (whatever it's called) would be a lot less money and still give you a nice cut.  Sharpening it would be much easier as well.

One other thing to note about the infinity bits is the gullets under the cutting edge are bigger.  I was cutting a circular plywood base with a circle cutting jig and used the whiteside compression bit.  It seemed like it was handling 1/8" fine, but when I needed to bite off more it was better to take successive passes and sneak up on my line.  In some cases my freehand jigsaw cut was 5/8" from my final dimension, so it took a bit more time to gradually shave that off with the whiteside.  It was my first time using it though, I just went my how the router felt when I tried to take a bigger bite.

For the record, I am chewing into 12mm, 15mm and 18mm BB ply.

Compressed bits: I have used a few on my CNC only... 1/4" there is no comparison with up/down cut bits. The compressed bits make a perfect clean cut and last longer. I haven't pushed the speed rate but at recommended speed it is a pure pleasure to use on hard wood or BB ply. Perform well on both  [smile]

The Infinity Ultimate bits

offers a skewed cutters on both sides (up and down if using the whole depth). It lead me to believe the cut will be similar to a compressed bit. Dust ejection might be also enhanced due to the bit shape. The bit is on it's way so i will be able to comment more next week  [wink]
Mario

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5060
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2018, 10:42 AM »
I had a look at the WS equivalent ($165CAD bottom bearing only) to the Infinity ($89CAD) ones and yes the price was a huge concern for a similar (look) product. Infinity have a similar one at $39CAD. one is more beefy not that it would make a big difference

Keep your eye open for specials at Woodcraft. Just 2 weeks ago they ran a 25% off coupon and I picked up the $169 Whiteside for $126. They've been running the 25% off coupon every 3-4 months.

There will probably be some type of promotion closer to the holidays.

Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1401
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: Flush trim advice
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2018, 11:14 AM »
287468-0

Works well.