Author Topic: inca jointer/planer  (Read 25347 times)

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Offline glass1

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inca jointer/planer
« on: February 16, 2009, 07:11 PM »
Is 500(I have to drive to get it so probably total cost is 575) a good price for an Inca jointer/planer ? its the two cutter head. Excellent condition  Does anybody have any experience and/or opinions with these machines thx Bengt 

Offline Steve-CO

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2009, 07:25 PM »
Sounds like getting knives/parts may be an issue, http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=45609

Here's a review, http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/inca_570.shtml

Looks like Dave owns one, sure he can be more help from a users perspective, http://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php?topic=1389.0

Offline neilc

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2009, 07:29 PM »
I have Inca's bandsaw, table saw, and jointer planer that I have had since the early 80's and they are excellent tools.  The earliest Incas were a green color.  In the early to mid-90's they switched to a blue color, so I'm curioius on the jointer / planer you are looking at.  Not sure which model you are considering, but you'll occasionally see them on eBay or in Craigs List.  $500 sounds like a pretty fair price.  From your description, it sounds like it could be the model 550 or 570.

There are some parts listed here - http://www.doebeli.ch/v1.x/index.html

Yahoo has an Inca forum - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/incawoodworking

It's a good resource for questions and advice.  I'm not sure the machines are still made.  They were most recently manufactured in France after moving from Switzerland years ago.  But they may have discontinued production.  Garrett Wade was the original importer and Eagle Tools in California has had a few parts and supplies.

Good luck.  I'd say they are the stationary equivalent of Festool in terms of fit and finish and quality.  I'm sorry they are not more broadly available.

neil



Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2009, 08:32 PM »
Bengt.....

I have two of them. I keep one 570 in jointer mode and one 570 in planer mode. (I got a very good deal a while back on the second one) Not that changing modes is difficult, it's just a lot easier not to. Also in the event of a machine issue and I'm hot into a project I could just always use one as a backup for both modes, and tend to the other one at a later date.
Backup is good. ;D  I also have other Inca machines, but that another discussion (and thread) for another time. To expand on what Nelic said , the original machines were Swiss made and were a mint green color when they were sold to a French group (and moved to France) it changed to a light retro blue color. The difference between the 570 and 550 is that the 570 has 3 Tersa blades and the 550 has 2 blades (I believe that they are not Tersa) The 3 blade cut is a lot smoother. I've only used the 570's, but have spoken to craftsmen that have moved from a 550 to a 570. My 570's have a 10 1/4 inch capacity.

Inca tools are the swiss version in a stationary tool that doesn't take up a lot of space to Festool's portable tools. They also seem to have had the same people sorting out their pricing.
There are parts that interconnect to other tools in the line with the same attention to detail as Festool. If you were the engineer type in the 70'- 80's and were into woodworking
.....you bought Inca.

Eagle tools in the Los Angeles area is the best resource for parts state side. http://www.eagle-tools.com/ 
They bought out all the spare parts from Garret Wade back when they ceased to carry them. You need to speak to Jesse or Raul.




Running through some 8/4 walnut.
(and yes, anything longer than what you see here....it would be a good idea to use rollers.)



I could talk more about them later this evening, I'm working at the shop and just stopped for a coffee break.

Keep in mind there were earlier models than what's been cited above, like the 400 series and also a 300 series (which has something close to a 7 inch capacity and has the motor below the table using a belt to drive the gears vs a motor in the housing as the 570.

$500 is a good price for any of the 500 series in good condition.......but you really need to read through all the posts on the yahoo site.

cheers,

Roger

VERY IMPORTANT..... If you get one - it is critical when in planer mode to wax and buff out the stainless elevator planer bed on a "very"regular basis.
                                          I use "Waxilit" (from eagle tools) (for a detailed explanation of what could happen if you don't - see Dave's post below ;), of course along with not overloading it)





trimming up a 5 foot curved lamination





« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 03:50 AM by Roger Savatteri »
Los Angeles, California

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2009, 08:35 PM »
I would say emphatically YES at that price.  I am still very satisfied with my Inca jointer/planer.  Mine is the 10 1/4 inch cut width unit with 2 knives.   The cut finish quality is very good, even with only two knives.  The few parts I have needed I have purchased from Eagle in California.  The last time I spoke with him (Summer 2008) they had knives in stock.  I have never needed to replace my knives.  Precision adjustment of the knives is rather easy due to their mounting system.  The design weakness is Inca's design to avoid overloading of the power feed system in event of a jamb, e.g if you try to force feed too great a cut depth.   My machine uses a thermoplastic (polyurethane?) O-ring to transfer power from a plastic motor pulley to another pulley connected to turn a worm gear which drives a molded plastic (nylon?) gear which drives a roller chain which drives toothed pulleys connected to the ends of the knurled shafts which pull the wood through the planer.  If a jam occurs, it will quickly overheat the elastomeric O-ring belt due to slippage on the pulleys.  It may also damage the teeth on the molded plastic gear.  Belts are about $20 each, but last a good amount of time.  The molded toothed gear costs about $60.  My first gear lasted more than 10 years until I jammed the machine when everything was very hot due to prolonged use, which resulted in fusing the elastomeric O-ring drive belt to the motor pulley and chewing up the teeth on the gear section I was using.  That molded gear is actually two gears in a single molded part, which enables user selection of one of two different speeds for the power feeder.  The fence and tables are excellent, as is the guard and the thickness adjustment mechanism.  The chip deflection/collection hood supplied with my machine also work well.  The hood connects to a 4 inch hose.  Last Summer I bought an extra gear and a couple of extra belts, just in case these components become NLA. 

Note that machines made later than mine may have a different drive system for the power feed rolls.  I have the components for this system, which were provided to me by Inca through Garrett Wade (NYC) several years ago when they were a dealer.  This feed roll drive system uses all metal components excepting the flat drive belt.  It appears to me with this flat belt system that any jam is going to place increased stress

I made a small roll about table for my Inca jointer/planer.   I extended the two long sides of the apron of the table so they can be used like handles of a wheelbarrow.  On the bottoms of the legs opposite the handles, I installed wheels.  This enables me to roll the machine easily from storage near a wall whenever I need clearance for longer stock.  The bottoms of the legs nearest the handles are equipped with rubber pads.  The motor of my machine is equipped with a short wire equipped with a male twist lock plug.  I have a couple of ~20 ft long extension cords equipped with complementary receptacles and plugs so I can use this planer anywhere in or near to my garage/shop.

And Roger's post shows well the quality of the finish, and correctly names the people who best know these machines if you need parts.

Dave R.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2009, 08:39 PM by Dave Ronyak »
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline glass1

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2009, 10:26 PM »
Thank you for the responses. There are some photos of the unit on the Providence craigslist--listed jan 1 under inca planer/jointer.
Bengt               

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2009, 11:45 PM »
Bengt,

I just took a look at the photos of the Inca on the Providence craigslist.

Go as fast as you can and get it.

Godspeed.

cheers,
Roger

ps. bring a 3 foot piece of oak or maple with you and put it through it's paces. (depending on the piece bring a rubber bottom push paddle as well)
     use the low speed first, actually first check the belts around the plastic gears (2) to make sure they are seated.
     bring some paste wax and apply to the planer bed and buff it out before you try it.
     raise and lower the elevator bed all the way and work the adjustment of the infeed "jointer" table.
     It might have been a while since the owner actually used the machine.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 04:28 AM by Roger Savatteri »
Los Angeles, California

Offline Dan Clermont

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2009, 01:54 AM »
I don't own an Inca jointer / planer but consider swiss made tools to be some of the finest!!

I work in the film industry and we have used Nagra Kudelski Reel to Reel machines for decades (designed and built in Switzerland) and they could not be built to a higher standard.

I believe their is a Yahoo group for Inca machines and you may want to join the group to learn more about these machines

Dan Clermont
Canadian Festool Dealer and User!!!
604.291.9663

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2009, 02:05 AM »
I believe their is a Yahoo group for Inca machines and you may want to join the group to learn more about these machines
Dan Clermont


It was mentioned earlier in this thread...........http://groups.yahoo.com/group/incawoodworking/

also......

here is the link for Waxilit, mentioned earlier as a necessary lubricant for the elevator platform on Inca planers as well as a good lubricant for the aluminum casting tabletops on all Inca tools ........also very good on surfaces you don't want glue to adhere to.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32092&cat=1,43415,43440&ap=1







« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 03:46 AM by Roger Savatteri »
Los Angeles, California

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2009, 02:36 AM »
Outline /500 Inca Jointer- Planer series .......


This is an outline history of the 500 Inca Jointer- Planer series, as seen on the  Inca tool forum website ...........http://groups.yahoo.com/group/incawoodworking

This is quoted outline from Alan Maier on the Yahoo woodworking group.......

"The 510 has the motor under the table, 2 cutter head, short tables,
and the best feed drive train(see messages and photos of the drives on
the machines on this web-site in photos).

550, 560, 570 all have the motor attached to the side of the frame.

550, 560, 570 all have the longer tables.

There are two knife and three knife versions of the 550 and 560. (I do
not think that there were any 570's with standard cutters, all were
tersa. But I am not 100% sure when in the line-up the switch to Terssa
occured. Perhaps someone in this group knows the facts on this.)

At sometime the feed drive on the 560/570 was changed to a flat belt
design. I had a 550 with the round green belt drive and standard 2
head cutter. I upgraded to the 570 flat-belt 3 blade tersa just as
Garrett Wade announced that they were no longer selling INCA. So I am
a bit "hazy" on exactly where in time/model line up the changes were
made. Thought I had it figured out, but was corrected after other
posts I made.

My favorite is my 510 which I upgraded to have 570 style longer
tables. If I could only find someone who could install a 3 blade tersa
head on my 510, that would be ideal!!!

However, any INCA J/P is a top knotch machine."

Regards
Alan Maier
« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 03:52 AM by Roger Savatteri »
Los Angeles, California

Offline glass1

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2009, 09:17 PM »
Well I picked up the unit today. It seems to be lightly used(one owner hobbist). It has the two knife cutterhead with the flat drive belt.

I have never used a combination machine before (certainly not an inca), so I have many questions
Sometimes I set up a pretty elaborate shop on site  can the inca run on 120? I thought I read this somewhere.
Is there anything I should look for before fully using it?    I'll think of more later.   thx bengt

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2009, 11:42 PM »

Bengt,

Congrats on your inca, now you need to get the Inca bandsaw!  ;D (the large 3 wheel model)

Do you have the manual for that model?, if you don't ..... on the yahoo site - I believe in the photo section there are some pdf's you could download.

If you got the dust hood with your set -up, take care with it. It's a bit temper-mental when switching between modes.

and order your Waxilit !

Roger
Los Angeles, California

Offline glass1

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2009, 11:55 PM »
On the plate it reads model 343 190 03. I also noticed the motor plate says 115 volt at 20 amps. It has the opposed male plug(like the festool vacuum). Can I just plug it into either 240 or 120 ?  Got the dust hood but no manual.

Offline neilc

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2009, 12:08 AM »
That's a 20amp 110 volt plug, so you should be good to go even if you plug it into the adapter for the vac.

You can also rewire it to 220 volt.  Mine is wired for 110 and works on a 20 amp circuit.

Check out the yahoo group.  It's a great community for resources and tips.

Congrats, you got a great deal.

Neil

Offline glass1

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2009, 06:08 PM »
I put the inca to work today. I only ran the jointer as I am waiting for the o ring belt for the planer. I am truly blown away. I am  very happy   Now what other tools did they make? Are they all this good. Do you lube the four threaded posts that raise the planer bed? - with something that is not sticky? Anybody figured out dust collection for the jointer? thx Bengt

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2009, 07:21 PM »
I put the inca to work today. I only ran the jointer as I am waiting for the o ring belt for the planer. I am truly blown away. I am  very happy   Now what other tools did they make? Are they all this good. Do you lube the four threaded posts that raise the planer bed? - with something that is not sticky? Anybody figured out dust collection for the jointer? thx Bengt

Bengt,

I'm at the studio,  so a quick response to the "lube" question.

Go to your nearest bicycle shop and get a bottle of "White Lightning" self cleaning wax lubricant.

then spritz it on the treaded rods..........

It works great!


Los Angeles, California

Offline neilc

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2009, 07:25 PM »
I don't lube the four table screws for the planer and my unit is 25 years old and still working great.  If you feel you need to, I would suggest a dry spray lube.

Did you order the belts from Eagle tools?

As for jointer dust collection, I have a dust collector and the Inca dust hood but it's almost too much trouble to try to get it to fit in the planer area below the jointer table for anything but big production runs.  I basically put the dust collection hose under it and let it pick up what it can and it tends to keep the high volume dust out of the air.  Not perfect, but efficient!

Glad you like the J/P.  Join the yahoo group and you'll see their bandsaws and tablesaws for sale there from time to time.  The small bandsaw is a great addition if you have space and the need.  An Inca 259 table saw is a classic but has it's nuances you have to live with.  I think the tablesaw and bandsaws are on par with the J/P.  They also made an excellent shaper but I never had a need for one.  The only dud I owned was their radial arm saw which was manufactured for them by another company and I ended up selling it when sliding compound miter saws came out years ago.  With a Festool Kapex option, though, who needs that now!

Enjoy the new tool!

neil

Offline Roger Savatteri

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2009, 08:08 PM »
hmmm,

"White lighning" is considered a dry lube........

http://www.whitelightningco.com/products/index.htm

This is the explanation as used for trail bikes that kick up a lot of dust.........

Clean Ride sets up as a dry wax film. There is no oily film to attract abrasive contaminants, so your chain and gears will perform better and last 2 to 3 times longer. Clean Ride's self-cleaning action is activated by any dirt, grit or grime that finds it's way onto your chain or parts. Small particles of the outer wax structure will flake off, taking the dirt, grime or grit with it. This begins the cycle of 'self-cleaning'. Clean Ride is a unique, wax-based lubricant, so it is important to start with a clean chain. For optimum 'self-cleaning' performance, do not mix Clean Ride with oil based lubricants. The dirtier the ride, the more active the shedding action. So to this extent, Clean Ride will require more frequent re-application after dirtier rides. When Clean Ride is used regularly and properly, you'll rarely have to clean your chain again. So, while your buddies are cleaning their chains, you'll be applying a fresh shot of Clean Ride and heading out for yet another great ride!

Neil...... I actually prefer the drip bottle to the spray, as it gets into the area of the treaded rod with greater ease.

If you prefer a spray bottle, I believe they also have that.

(Another product that I use is "Finish Line" a dry teflon lube by Finish Line Tech)

I've been using both for a couple of years now.

cheers,
Roger
« Last Edit: February 20, 2009, 11:29 PM by Roger Savatteri »
Los Angeles, California

Offline Dave Ronyak

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  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2009, 08:36 PM »
This has become an interesting discussion of some of the nuances of maintenance of the Inca jointer/planer. 

I use Waxlit or Drycoat on the tables.   As Roger stated, its important to keep the stainless steel surface of the planer support table clean (of any wood or glue residue) and lubricated.  Makes a big difference in the wood feeding smoothly through via the  power feeder.

For the four adjustment screws that determine the thickness of a planed board, I have occasionally cleaned them using a penetrating solvent/thin lubricant such as WD-40.  I have also lubricated them with fine powered graphite or molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) suspended in an evaporating, penetrating solvent oil that comes in a drip spout can.  Sorry, but I cannot remember the exact name of this product that I bought many years ago from a commercial bearings supply distributor.  I've also found this product to be the best long range solution to many squeaking door hinges and automotive clutch pedal mechanism that nothing else cured, even on systems allegedly engineered and fabricated of materials that are supposed to be self-lubricating and maintenance free  (e.g. the notorious 1993 BMW 325i clutch pedal squeak).  By occasional, I mean every few years.  I don't work with woods that are known to have a high silica content.  I have never serviced the roller chain that connects and drives the four planing thickness adjustment screws synchronously.

For the planer's  knurled feed roller drive mechanism, I follow Inca's recommendations, using a light coating lithium grease on the gears, and some penetrating chain lube on the roller chain.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline glass1

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2009, 12:40 AM »
I got a couple of days down using the planer. I am still extremely impressed. Even in high speed mode the finish is first rate. The machine even sounds good(great motor). This brings up another point. Up until know I have really enjoyed my milwaukie scms until the inca reminded how awful and loud the mil scms sounds.

Offline helena

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Re: inca jointer/planer
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2010, 03:30 PM »
Hi Dave - I recently accquired an Inca Planer thicknesser but unfortunately the gear assembly is all missing I have the flat drive belt and the worm gear but anything in between is not there. I believe the model I have the the equivalent of the 570. I badly need a photo of the gear asembly in place to see what parts I need to order as I have been told that I can now get these from Incamachines.com in France. Can you please, please help?

Tony