Author Topic: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video  (Read 2560 times)

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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« on: May 30, 2018, 10:59 PM »
Hi Everyone

If you want to make near perfect 30 or 60 degree cuts on your MFT3 or custom tracksaw cutting station then this may be the answer. I thought my Kapex was the best way for doing multiple angle cuts but if you narrow it down to just 30, 60 and 90 degrees my new MFT3 top beats it by miles.

Take a look:



I will make the drawing freely available very soon....

Here it is:

* Isometric MFT3 Top.pdf (45.92 kB - downloaded 103 times.)

Axminster will also put it on their web site in the next week or so.

NOTE: A couple of people are concerned about the copyright notice on the drawing. That is there to protect my design but I am happy for anyone to use this design to create an MFT3 top for their own use and this applies to both amateur and professional woodworkers. The design may not be used to create a product for sale or hire.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2018, 04:31 AM by Peter Parfitt »

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Offline Wooden Skye

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  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2018, 08:05 AM »
Peter. Interesting video.  I'm assuming you would still be able to do 45 degree angles if using certain sets of holes. 
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino DF 500, 2 domino systainers, ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, (2) OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2018, 08:21 AM »
Thanks Peter.  As I commented on your YouTube video, now I "must" go out and make an isometric top.  I don't really have a need to cut 30 or 60 degree angles, but you know... it's just one more of those things you gotta have just in case  ;).

It is a pleasure to use the Parf Guide System so it's kinda fun drilling the holes.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2514
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2018, 09:11 AM »
Fantastic application of the Parf setup gauges to get new angles.  Really great how you figured that out, Peter!


Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2018, 09:24 AM »
Peter. Interesting video.  I'm assuming you would still be able to do 45 degree angles if using certain sets of holes.

I have been unable to see an easy way to do a 45 degree cut. One could add a couple of extra holes but my worry was that this would confuse the whole thing and make getting the right ones for 30 and 60 degrees tricky.

Peter

Offline clark_fork

  • Posts: 272
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2018, 10:23 AM »
Here is a suggestion for the first test of the new layout.



Domino 500 MM Guide
Clark Fork

"A lot of people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths."  Stephen Wright

"straight, smooth and square" Mr. Russell, first day high school shop class-1954

" What's the good of it?" My Sainted Grandmother

"You can't be too rich, too thin or have too many clamps." After my introduction to pocket joinery and now the MFT work process

"Don't make something unless it is both made necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful,
don't hesitate to make it beautiful." -- Shaker dictum

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 1120
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2018, 10:46 AM »
Here is a suggestion for the first test of the new layout.

(Attachment Link)

Domino 500 MM Guide
Ha! I like it! Watch, this will now become an upcoming Woodpeckers One Time Tool!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5067
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2018, 11:39 AM »
Ha! I like it! Watch, this will now become an upcoming Woodpeckers One Time Tool!

 [big grin]  Funny... [not worthy]

Offline clark_fork

  • Posts: 272
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2018, 11:18 AM »

The astonishing revelation of this new isometric layout methodology is that it may be used to impose the isometric layout on an existing MFT. By careful planning, two vee shaped rows may be added to an existing table to meet most 30° and 60° cuts. See the initial layout scheme in the introductory video.

I grandiosely call this the Churchillian VEE as in VEE for victory over the tyranny of 90° and 45° cuts. In this reserved environment of FOG, it is better labeled the “Isometric Vee.”

What say the jury?

Clark Fork

"A lot of people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths."  Stephen Wright

"straight, smooth and square" Mr. Russell, first day high school shop class-1954

" What's the good of it?" My Sainted Grandmother

"You can't be too rich, too thin or have too many clamps." After my introduction to pocket joinery and now the MFT work process

"Don't make something unless it is both made necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful,
don't hesitate to make it beautiful." -- Shaker dictum

Offline waho6o9

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Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2018, 09:52 AM »
I grandiosely call this the Churchillian VEE as in VEE for victory over the tyranny of 90° and 45° cuts. In this reserved environment of FOG, it is better labeled the “Isometric Vee.”

What say the jury?

^ We are on the same accord. Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition.

<<EDIT:  Removed YouTube video link - P.Halle - Moderator
« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 01:03 PM by Peter Halle »

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2018, 10:28 AM »
I am camping in The Netherlands and the wifi is not brilliant. I just lost my first effort at replying...

The "V" sign dates back to the days of the English longbowmen - Google "Battle of Agincourt". In the 13th century the longbow was a serious weapon that could defeat armour at 300 m. If the French caught an English archer they would cut off his first two fingers on his bow hand making it impossible to use the weapon again. As a mark of defiance the English archers would wave two fingers at the French which in effect meant "...bring it on"  or "we are ready for you".

Churchill borrowed the "V" sign and used it to mean Victory. Today the "V" sign is used as an insult.

But back to the Isometric MFT3 Top...

I will solve the 45 degree setup when I am back home and try and include it in a video within the next couple of months.

Peter

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2007
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2018, 01:00 PM »
Palm out the Vee fingers signal peace, back handed the vee means ignore the index finger.

Offline CabinetKid

  • Posts: 30
Re: Isometric MFT3 Top - Video
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2018, 05:49 AM »

The "V" sign dates back to the days of the English longbowmen - Google "Battle of Agincourt". In the 13th century the longbow was a serious weapon that could defeat armour at 300 m. If the French caught an English archer they would cut off his first two fingers on his bow hand making it impossible to use the weapon again. As a mark of defiance the English archers would wave two fingers at the French which in effect meant "...bring it on"  or "we are ready for you".

Churchill borrowed the "V" sign and used it to mean Victory. Today the "V" sign is used as an insult.


Peter

Unfortunately the heroic defiance by the archers was created several hundred years after the events and is nothing more than a myth, the only contemporary record of those times talks of 3 fingers being cut off as it would take 3 and not 2 fingers to pull a longbow. As for Churchill, he actually "borrowed" it from a Belgian - Victor de Laveleye - who during a speech in 1941 on the BBC suggested the V be used as a symbol of defiance. When Churchill adopted it he would often do so with the palm pointing in until his aides explained that to the working classes that meant something else --- an insult.

But enough of history, back to the subject :-)