Author Topic: LF help/safety advice with router bits  (Read 1237 times)

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Offline JustinWG

  • Posts: 34
LF help/safety advice with router bits
« on: May 03, 2017, 11:24 PM »
I've recently purchased an OF 1400 as my first router.  With very minimal knowledge about routers, I find myself wondering a lot about different tips and project use. 

After doing some research, I've learned that a flush trim bit is one of the key bits to have.  Clearly, there are a large number of brands and options to choose from.  Locally, I have Freud and Whiteside available. 

One of my first projects that I'll be working on is a new door and closet package for the house.  I was looking to pick up a 1/2" shank, but I am uncertain as for the length of bit that would be ideal/recommended.  My initial thoughts would be to get something at least 1 3/4" long, as that matches the new door thickness.  My lack of experience and knowledge makes me wonder if there is any (significant) risk(s) to using a bit that long - even if I want to flush something akin to 1/2"-3/4" sheet goods?  Assuming I don't try to climb cut or overly aggressive will I be fine?  Should I consider a different size?

I had additionally considered using this bit in a jointer jig for a later project. 

Or am I going about this all wrong?

Thanks in advance.

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4835
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2017, 11:37 PM »
Tell us what you plan on doing with the router.

How do you plan on using it on the door? Why do you want the bit to match door thickness?

!/2x1-3/4 bit will be fine in the 1400.

Tom

Offline TOOLTOWN

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    • tooltown.com
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2017, 11:38 PM »
Overall diameter matters more than length.  The larger the diameter, the faster the outside edge spins at a given RPM.  It is important to match RPM to bit diameter, and most bits come with a guide about max speed. 

You can, and should retract the bit leaving only the thickness to be trimmed plus a bit exposed beneath the router base.  With that said you can definitely get a 2 inch bit to trim 1 3/4 door, and then us it on thinner sheet goods.  Depending how hard you push the bit and quality there may be the slightest deflection given the long span, but it should be minimal.

You will soon find that the router is one of the most versatile tools around, there is a wealth of information out there about what you can do with one. Don't be surprised if they start multiplying (I think I'm up to 7 or 8 in my own shop now).

Ken

Offline JustinWG

  • Posts: 34
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2017, 11:55 PM »
@tjbnwi - Doors are prehung.  Router intended for clean adjustments to height (bottom and top edges).  Theoretically, shouldn't have to worry about cleaning up the mortises for mounting or the handle hole.

*Edit* - As for why I wanted the bit that long - I had assumed it would be best to clear any height discrepancies in single-unit passes, opposed to several possible adjustments.  Additionally, I would like learn how to build a jointing sled (I don't own a jointer, nor do I know anyone who does) and save myself some funds for other tools/projects.  I gather that a 1/2" x 1-3/4" would be sufficient for making a flush face on 2x material (with relative easy/efficiency).
« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 12:04 AM by JustinWG »

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4835
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2017, 11:59 PM »
@tjbnwi - Doors are prehung.  Router intended for clean adjustments to height (bottom and top edges).  Theoretically, shouldn't have to worry about cleaning up the mortises for mounting or the handle hole.

How are you going to guide the bit or router?

TS saw is the better choice for cleaning up the doors.

I don't recall ever having to trim the top of a pre-hung. Bottom and edges all to often.

Other possible uses you have in mind?

I find bits cut best in the 80 mph range. Small bites, harder the wood, slower the feed rate.

Tom
« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 12:04 AM by tjbnwi »

Offline JustinWG

  • Posts: 34
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2017, 12:23 AM »
Quote

How are you going to guide the bit or router?

TS saw is the better choice for cleaning up the doors.

I don't recall ever having to trim the top of a pre-hung. Bottom and edges all to often.

Other possible uses you have in mind?

I find bits cut best in the 80 mph range. Small bites, harder the wood, slower the feed rate.

Tom

Guiding the router with a rail, bit with a bearing (where possible, applicable, and/or necessary).

I also acquired a TS, and plan on primarily using that where I can.  I understand that will provide more consistent efficiency.

The trimming of the doors with said router/bit, was more of an "if-than".

As far as other projects for the router -

1.  Learning
2.  Closet packs (possible dados - don't own a dado stack)
3.  Shop cabinets - possibly interior cabinets/vanities after I get some more skill/practice.
4.  Edge trimming (iron on edge banding on shelving)
5.  Jointing
6.  Venting a media cabinet
7.  Furniture improvements
8.  1" round-over on stair treads 

Etc....

And thank you for confirming that less is more.  Being a bit timid with the router, I figured that was the safest approach.  I haven't had the pleasure of working with anything other than 3/4" BC shop ply, red oak, and douglas fir... yet.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 12:27 AM by JustinWG »

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4835
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2017, 08:14 AM »
The 1400 will be a good all around router for what you describe.

You can purchase a basic set with a vanity of bits in it to paretic with and get the feel of the router. Specific bits as needed.

I'd lean towards the Whiteside over the Freud.

Tom

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2017, 09:19 AM »
As a new router user, you need to download the OF1400 Supplemental Manual. http://www.waterfront-woods.com/festool/OF1400_manual_usa.pdf

This was the second manual I did for Festool over a decade ago, and I had the specific desire to use it to educate router users on the general principles of using a router, and not just discussing the OF1400 itself. This was a huge departure from what owner's manuals were supposed to be about back then.

Online Bob D.

  • Posts: 257
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2017, 04:38 PM »
As a new router user, you need to download the OF1400 Supplemental Manual. http://www.waterfront-woods.com/festool/OF1400_manual_usa.pdf

This was the second manual I did for Festool over a decade ago, and I had the specific desire to use it to educate router users on the general principles of using a router, and not just discussing the OF1400 itself. This was a huge departure from what owner's manuals were supposed to be about back then.

Nice job on the manual Rick, I wish all manuals were written with this level of detail with such clear illustrations and photos.

Is that a selfie on page 14 ?   :)
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline JustinWG

  • Posts: 34
Re: LF help/safety advice with router bits
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2017, 01:42 AM »
@Rick Christopherson - thank you for the link to the manual.  I will be checking that out.