Author Topic: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting  (Read 14659 times)

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Offline BMH

  • Posts: 370
Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« on: November 13, 2008, 07:10 PM »

Has anybody used this tool before. I have 30 Andersen windows that need to have the old paint removed . I am trying not to use my Festool sander as the first line of attack.

Bruce


http://www.westernwooddoctor.com/speedheater-paint-remover.htm

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Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2008, 07:39 PM »
I've never used such a tool Bruce (welcome to the forum) -- but I'm just finishing up 30+ sashes (double hung, 6 lites per sash) --- a considerable undertaking ----- sanding to bare wood, deglazing/reglazing , and repainting.   I used a combination of RAS 115, Rotex 125 and Deltex 93 to accomplish the task.  The RAS can throw a little debris, so I built a little containment area.   These sanders do a pretty good and quick job and I can't imagine any other method being much easier or faster --- but I ain't no expert  ;).

Justin
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline mastercabman

  • Posts: 1854
  • NORFOLK,VA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2008, 08:51 PM »
--- but I ain't no expert  ;).

Justin
Isn't it double negative? ;D ;D ;D :D :D
I don't understand!?! I keep cutting it,and it's still too short!

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2008, 09:10 PM »
--- but I ain't no expert  ;).

Justin
Isn't it double negative? ;D ;D ;D :D :D

Positively Jerry,  ;) but not by design ----- absolutely for sure, I don't know nothing never. (neither)   :D


Justin
« Last Edit: November 13, 2008, 09:28 PM by Justin F. »
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline Kevin Johnson

  • Posts: 86
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2008, 10:56 PM »
I have never used one, but last week there was a thread on Taunton's Breaktime that piqued my interest.  I thought that they were a little pricey (like Festool), but found another site where a guy described how be built one for less than $100.  If you are interested I can post that or send it to you.

Offline BMH

  • Posts: 370
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2008, 11:30 PM »
If you have the link that would be great

Bruce


Offline Eli

  • Posts: 2501
  • A Yankee in Kangaroo Court
    • Metafizix
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2008, 06:21 AM »
You can use a common quartz heater, just bolt a grout float trowel to the back of it for a handle and use some flashing to make some standoffs so it isn't too close. Is that what the link says? (amazing kreskin act)
« Last Edit: November 14, 2008, 04:47 PM by Eli »
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Mike Chrest

  • Posts: 386
  • N.W. New York State
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2008, 04:39 PM »
I bought another version of this beast. It is called "The Silent Paint Remover". It works pretty good. I have been taking multiple layers of paint off my house section by section. Works best on latex paint. Old stuff just bubbles up like bubble gum & you can lift big patches with a putty knife every couple minutes. Made a bracket for my "Third Hand" pole to hold it in place so I could scrape one spot while heating the next.

Tried doing windows with it. Not that easy. Have to angle it to stay off the glazing. Cover panes with aluminum foil to reflect the heat (instructions say it might crack windows).

If I had to start from scratch I would try building one like Kevin posted.
Mike

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2008, 02:08 PM »
Any one know the implications of using heat removal for lead paint?   I like to use a festool sander + vac + mask for the dust when removing lead based paint.  If you are using heat is there less of a problem with the lead?  If you want to sell a property here now you need a certificate to show that the paintwork has been tested for lead (but half of Paris still has lead water pipes) :-\

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2008, 02:22 PM »
Heat guns when removing paint can cause the lead to be "vaporized" and you can breath it in.  Typically, the heat gun should only be used to soften the paint, glazing, etc, ---- not cause it to smolder.   People in the preservationist field who deal with windows and structures that most probably have lead paint, are experimenting with and successfully using steam to remove the paint, etc.  It doesn't tend to release the lead in a gaseous form, does not cause accidental fires, does allow for continuous films/pieces of material (paint, glazing,etc) to be removed as opposed to sanded debris, while not  dramatically increasing the moisture content of the structure.

Justin

" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2008, 03:02 PM »
Thanks for the info on steam - any one know anything about steam paint removers ?

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2008, 03:05 PM »
Richard ---  check out http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/index.htm and look for info/videos on using steam.

Justin
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2008, 03:30 PM »
Thank you very much Justin

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2008, 03:39 PM »
De rien ,  Richard. 


Justin
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline BMH

  • Posts: 370
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2008, 06:40 AM »
Mike would you recommend using the silent paint remover versus sanding to remove the paint from the windows?

Bruce

Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2008, 12:35 AM »
Any one know the implications of using heat removal for lead paint?   I like to use a festool sander + vac + mask for the dust when removing lead based paint.  If you are using heat is there less of a problem with the lead?  If you want to sell a property here now you need a certificate to show that the paintwork has been tested for lead (but half of Paris still has lead water pipes) :-\

So it appears to me that at least some of these French authorities are as whacky as many Americans?!  Or are those lead pipes only in drain systems?  It's the lead oxide [dust] that is normally of most concern when dealing with old paint and its removal.  I say "whacky Americans" because I have been exposed to lead paint, leaded gasoline (petrol to you?), red lead and white lead compounds for setting clearances and contact patterns on gears, leaded solders, and molten lead for making fishing line sinkers and bullets, and lead shot for refilling shotgun shells all of my 62 years, and my father did so even longer without any adverse consequences.  But do keep the dust out of your lungs!!

Please, no flames from the environmentalists among us.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2008, 12:53 AM »
Things have changed ---- I remember as a kid eating ducks killed in a recent hunting trip and spitting out lead shot left in the bird -- didn't think anything of it. 

Justin
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline richard.selwyn

  • Posts: 635
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2008, 01:43 PM »
I think the French are just as "Whacky" as the americans.  My workshop is in a watermill with a 15ft drop mill race which could create about 15kw electricity - environmentally friendly and totally renewable - but I'm not currently allowed - by European Law - to do anything that might stop migratory fish swimming the 3 miles or so to the stream's source. (Actually the only fish are baby trout released from a local fish farm every year for the local fishing club)  If I fixed the installation and lowered a sluice I could get a $20,000 fine and six months in prison.  I have an acquantaince who's already paid the fine - luckily he avoided prison.

Saturnism is probably a serious matter - but as I work with MDF all day I reckon formaldehyde is worse.

Offline Mike Chrest

  • Posts: 386
  • N.W. New York State
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2008, 06:41 PM »
Bruce,

Quote
Mike would you recommend using the silent paint remover versus sanding to remove the paint from the
windows?

Depends on what kind of paint you have. Oil base sands OK. It might be easier to sand the flat areas with a Rotex and vacuum. Mullions are hard to sand. The SPR works but angling it and masking off the panes with aluminum foil is tedious.

I can't think of an easy way to take latex paint off. I've tried a lot of paint removers. The Silent Paint Remover works but it is slow. Heating old latex paint forms big bubbles (like bubble gum) and if you time it right you can lift them with a sharp putty knife/scraper.

I don't think sanding latex works well at all. It melts onto the pad real quick. My sister used a Metabo paint scraper to do her house and liked it. I haven't tried it. Don't know how it would work on windows.

I tried a little grinder from Wagner that has a real coarse scrubbie pad. That thing looks like junk but it worked!!! I used it to feather the edges of any paint the SPR wouldn't lift. When the pad clogged up I whacked it on the scaffold a couple of times and the paint clogs fell off. It does not have dust collection, so it made a big mess.

http://www.amazon.com/Wagner-Power-Products-513040-PaintEater/dp/B000FFYLJQ/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Mike

Mike
« Last Edit: December 05, 2008, 06:48 PM by Mike Chrest »

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2008, 07:50 PM »
The Rotex or RAS 115 does a pretty good job removing latex if you use the lowest grits of Saphir sandpaper.   I've seen huge improvements with the RAS when using Saphir 24 grit and a sander setting around 3.  Overall, latex is a pain and sometimes a hand held scraper is the ticket (don't overlook a good scraper) as the latex will often just sit on the surface and can be peeled away with some ease.  After restoring the  40 or so sashes that I have, I'm convinced that latex, especially thick layers of latex, is one of the main reasons for wood rot.  Latex seems to give no penetration, sitting on the wood, and water ,if it can work its way through cracks in in the paint, just stays behind the paint film with bare contact to the wood --- all types of fungi and mold love it in there and begin the rot.   

Justin

Moreover:    Latex with latex primer seems to cause greater problems than latex with oil based primer.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2008, 07:54 PM by Justin F. »
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "

Offline Mike Chrest

  • Posts: 386
  • N.W. New York State
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2008, 07:56 AM »
Quote
Latex seems to give no penetration, sitting on the wood, and water ,if it can work its way through cracks in in the paint, just stays behind the paint film with bare contact to the wood --- all types of fungi and mold love it in there and begin the rot.   

Very true!

Offline Justin F.

  • Posts: 311
  • Louisiana, USA
Re: Paint removal speedheater paint remover. First posting
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2008, 12:18 PM »
Quote
Latex seems to give no penetration, sitting on the wood, and water ,if it can work its way through cracks in in the paint, just stays behind the paint film with bare contact to the wood --- all types of fungi and mold love it in there and begin the rot.   

Very true!

Good to hear you agree Mike --- I'm thinking Latex paints have been a big help to the epoxy repair suppliers.



Justin
" The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding. "