Author Topic: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine  (Read 15360 times)

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Offline jimbo51

  • Posts: 390
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #60 on: October 01, 2016, 06:59 AM »
Will it fit in the back of an Elio?


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Offline antss

  • Posts: 1188
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2016, 07:56 AM »
Seth, was that $300 the profit you you would have made keeping the cnc job in house or just the subbed fee you paid the jobber?

Did that include the hour of your time you would have spent running the Origin ? Did it include the opportunity cost of you're not being able to utilize that hour doing another task that produced revenue for your company? 

That sublet job should have included margin for you when you billed it back to the client, so there should be $90-$100 dollars going into your business on that $300 sub out so that you can have resources to do things like buy new Festools.     :)

On the surface , it seems you've just laid out an easy payment plan or self rationalization for getting a new toy. Nothing wrong with that, I'll wager just about all the members of this board have done that at some point.

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 772
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2016, 09:43 AM »
What about the time spent subbing the job out, getting the material to the subby, explaining what was required, getting the finished job back, and the waiting hoping that you get what you actually want.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1032
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #63 on: October 01, 2016, 10:22 AM »
What about the time spent subbing the job out, getting the material to the subby, explaining what was required, getting the finished job back, and the waiting hoping that you get what you actually want.
Excellent point. ... and possibly delaying the next phases of you project due to lack of this critical part.

Online SRSemenza

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  • Posts: 7847
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #64 on: October 01, 2016, 11:20 AM »
   These things can be very situational and anecdotal. Yes the full $300 would have had some offset. In this case I had time to run the shaper, and create the pattern. Granted some of that time I could have been doing something else. However I would not have needed to take time to make two trips to the CNC shop, etc.

  And I could have had the parts same day or next instead of a week later. In this case it was not a production item either. I needed two not ten or twenty. So there was no "mass" production time or money savings by having outsourced it. 

  Realistically It would have made a $200 difference on my end. But the general point I was making is that the Shaper, even at a fairly high cost, has a profit generating place.

  And, Svar and Bohdan pointed out, additional non-monetary advantages.

  Not saying the Shaper is right for everyone in every situation, just pointing out that it has place in the professional world. Having one wouldn't mean that I would use  it in place of a CNC shop every time but it would be a good tool in the arsenal for me.

Seth

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2866
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #65 on: October 01, 2016, 11:56 AM »
I have a Cutawl K-11.

It's an early 20th Century tool that is still used in industry, primarily for cutting slots for die stock.

The Cutawl is basically a sewing machine liberated from the table. The reciprocating shaft is offset in swivel bearings so the blade follows the lead of the operator. It is the ultimate scroll saw and acn cut acute inside corners that the Shaper could approach only with the tiniest end mill (and commensurate slower stock removal).

The Shaper is in many ways the 21st Century replacement of the Cutawl (except for the above example which is a piece of cake for a laser cutter or high pressure water jet). Although generally similar in size shape and function, the Cutawl requires supreme focus from the operator while the Shaper only needs casual attention. And the Cutawl requires a full scale template secured to the work beforehand.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2866
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #66 on: October 01, 2016, 11:15 PM »
Just found an official price sheet for the Cutawl K11 from 1958.
The price at that time was $195. Probably pretty close to the 2016 price of the Shaper.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3300
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #67 on: October 02, 2016, 10:52 AM »
...the Cutawl requires supreme focus from the operator while the Shaper only needs casual attention.

That's an understatement...I think after an hour of use you'd need to just walk away from it for a day or two.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2866
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #68 on: October 02, 2016, 12:07 PM »
...the Cutawl requires supreme focus from the operator while the Shaper only needs casual attention.

That's an understatement...I think after an hour of use you'd need to just walk away from it for a day or two.

Some designs require less focus.

Back in the day workers in store display shops ran the things all day long, with no visible hearing protection. Maybe cotton balls? It's pretty much like freehand routing but the noise is much less annoying.

 

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3300
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #69 on: September 07, 2017, 02:39 PM »
Just got this in my e-mail...interesting.

The Shaper Origin will now be packaged in its own Systainer.

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/f20cb62a537070d95b62a38db/images/e6e9a86f-6dc2-4af6-a6b6-29430b522a3b.gif

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1032
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #70 on: September 07, 2017, 02:52 PM »
I think it will be a success. One way to improve it is to use reusable markers/beacons or just surrounding stationary objects instead of the tape for positioning and orientation. With all the current development of Structure From Motion technology it's a logical direction.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 04:54 PM by Svar »

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 725
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #71 on: September 07, 2017, 10:19 PM »
Ha! Thats funny they chose to put it in a Systainer.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1509
Re: Shaper Origin the first handheld Cnc machine
« Reply #72 on: September 08, 2017, 07:04 AM »
Not so funny when you consider Festool is making the router motor... ties right in there.   [big grin]  Mine will get shipped in the second release.