Author Topic: Table Saw Blade Recommendations  (Read 1556 times)

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Offline Runhard

  • Posts: 814
Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« on: May 05, 2019, 12:30 PM »
Dear Foggers,

Please help me determine a complete range of table saw blades for my Industrial 5hp SawStop. I have been looking at Forrest and Tenryu. I would be working with mostly hard and soft woods and plywood every once in a while. I also want a great dado set. I’m sure that I can figure it out but I would like to see what you guys are using and like the most.

Thanks,

Daniel
Daniel

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Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1008
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2019, 01:09 PM »
I have used only two combo blades in my SawStop PCS (acquired 5 years ago):

  • SawStop 10" Titanium-Coated Saw Blades 40-tooth, 1/8" Kerf
  • Woodworker II Blade, 10" x 40-Tooth, 1/8" Kerf

Hands-down, the WWII produces better cut quality than the SS Titanium blade as I rotate their use. Both have never been resharpened, something I plan to do next year or so. The teeth on the WWII are still wicked sharp, and I handle the blade with care when cleaning and spraying to avoid getting nicked.

At the recommendation of another woodworker, I picked up the other day a Woodworker II Blade, 10" x 30-Tooth, 1/8" Kerf that has yet to be installed. Included in his recommendation is this reminder:

"The Sawstop manual warns about the drawbacks of using chip limiting rip blades. It will be hard to find one that doesn’t have safety shoulders so you have to be aware it may take longer to stop the blade if you activate the brake."

Price-wise, the Tenryu is very good like the SS Titanium: https://tenryusawblades.com/product.php?productid=17974&cat=344&page=1

I intend to use the 30-tooth WWII for rip cuts on hardwood (my go-to lumber). Interestingly, although the online product page says it is a combo blade, it is labeled as a rip blade on the packaging.

On average, I do about 6 - 8 projects (half of them smaller builds like trays or boxes) a year. The SawStop fills up about two to three bags of saw dust per year for the 1.5HP dust collector (for under-the-table dust collection), and about two bags for the small shop vac (above-the-table dust collection). I believe with proper care and resharpening, I won't need any more blades in the remaining years of my woodworking journey (that's, unless I fire off the cartridge!).

« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 02:26 PM by ChuckM »

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 279
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2019, 01:35 PM »
I recommend calling Tony at Forrest and having this conversation with him. He is an absolute wealth of knowledge. Their number is 1-800-733-7111 and his extension is 313. For my needs we ended up with a 40 tooth WW2 for combo, a 30 tooth WW2 Rip for ripping hardwood under 2” (get the 20 tooth version if you do a lot of thicker 3” + hardwoods). A plywood woodworker or a dura line hi at for plywood, melamine and super fine crosscuts in hardwood lumber. Talk to Tony, he will help you!

Also make sure that the dado set you choose is Sawstop compliant. Not all are.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 01:31 PM by Alanbach »

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1009
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2019, 01:57 PM »
I use mostly Ridge Carbide blades on my Unisaw, RAS, and miter saw, and I send them all my blades for sharpening, but they are close to me so shipping is cheap.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2516
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2019, 05:28 PM »
I use only Forrest blades and Dado sets on my SawStop Industrial table saw. I’ve been very happy with the blades. I usually have the saw blades resharpened by Forrest several times and they come back like new.

Remember to adjust the blade to brake gap when changing blades. The dado set I used with my old Unisaw would not work with the SawStop. I had to switch to the Forrest dado set.
Birdhunter

Offline Billedis

  • Posts: 619
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2019, 12:19 PM »
I use only Ridge Carbide blades and have had excellent results.  I would suggest you give them a call.

Offline Runhard

  • Posts: 814
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2019, 12:28 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

I'm going to order a few Forrest blades and see how well I like them.
Daniel

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3920
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2019, 12:35 PM »
 I prefer Forrest blades too. It’s not just the quality of the teeth, it’s the disk too.

I wanted and extra WWII when I was poor so took a chance on a used blade on eBay. It had been sharpened several times and the kerf was narrower than original specs but it cuts great and spins true.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5913
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2019, 12:56 PM »
I don’t have a SawStop but I also recommend Forrest. I started with the regular kerf blade and then switched to the thin kerf line when they were released.

I own and use their 8” dado set and it’s really slick.

Forrest is also a pleasure to deal with for resharpening. Their blades come in a cardboard box that can be used to ship the dull blade back to them for sharpening.



« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 08:30 AM by Cheese »

Online RKA

  • Posts: 1570
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2019, 01:16 PM »
Can anyone shed some light on the recent release of the Forrest WWII for the Sawstop?  What is different about it and what should people be aware of if they already use the regular WWII blades?  Maybe it has to do with the comment from the manual Chuck quoted above, but I don't really understand??
-Raj

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1008
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2019, 01:28 PM »
I have studied the product information Forrest provided on the SS WWII blade and the regular WWII blade, but could not find any difference between the two (may be other than the price (?). [eek]) I suppose Forrest was trying to assist a SS owner to pick the right blade from its product line by offering a regular WWII with a SS designation.

Offline Runhard

  • Posts: 814
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2019, 01:03 PM »
I just placed an order for Forrest blades with Highland Woodworking. Some of the items are out of stock.

Dado-King: 8"
Woodworker II: 10" x 20 Tooth 1/8" Kerf
Woodworker II: 10" x 30 Tooth 1/8" Kerf
Woodworker II: 10" x 40 Tooth 1/8" Kerf
Woodworker I: 10" x 60 Tooth 3/32" Thin Kerf
Duraline High-A/T Blade: 10" x 80 Tooth 1/8" Kerf
Ply Veneer Worker Blade: 10" x 70 Tooth-PVW 1/8" Kerk
Daniel

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2516
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2019, 01:04 PM »
Just be sure that the clearance between the saw teeth and the stop cartridge is correct. That is super critical.
Birdhunter

Offline Runhard

  • Posts: 814
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2019, 01:09 PM »
Just be sure that the clearance between the saw teeth and the stop cartridge is correct. That is super critical.

I haven't used the saw yet so I am not sure what exactly you mean. Is this self-explanatory or in the instructions?
Daniel

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1008
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2019, 03:19 PM »
I am assuming you are assembling your saw, and will be installing and checking the fence, blade, etc. The manual lay outs all the details. Your saw should come with a (yellow) plastic gauge that you use to check/set the gap between the cartridge and the saw blade.

Also make sure you have acquired the dado cartridge for use with any dado cutter (and the gap checking step is followed).

Needless to say, the saw is unplugged before you do any of the above.

Familiarize yourself with the start-up signals on the switch so you know the SS safety feature is actually on before you use it.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 03:23 PM by ChuckM »

Offline Bob Wolfe

  • Posts: 92
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2019, 01:02 AM »
You really only need two, at the most three bladed for your saw. A rip, a combination and a fine 80 tooth. The rest are bling....
BW

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5913
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2019, 01:35 AM »
FWIW...if you have any interest in making box joints, Forrest offers a blade for that chore that will produce absolutely square and flat cuts.

https://www.forrestblades.com/saw-blades-for-finger-joints-square-cut-box-joints-rabbets-grooves-and-dovetails/
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 02:05 PM by Cheese »

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3920
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2019, 09:50 AM »
The idea behind the Forrest Woodworker II is that it is an excellent combination blade which means you don’t need multiple blades for general use.

Right now I’m using a 32 tooth WWII. Don’t know the vintage but it’s either a thin kerf blade or it’s been sharpened man times but it gives great service for both ripping and cross cuts. I do use a back up block for reinforcing the wood as the blade exits on cross cuts.

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 944
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2019, 01:56 PM »
Ridge Carbide, FS Tools, Forrest are my favs.  They're all excellent quality.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 245
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2019, 02:41 PM »
You really only need two, at the most three bladed for your saw. A rip, a combination and a fine 80 tooth. The rest are bling....
BW

Agree.  I don't understand this infatuation with owning saw blades.  Get a crosscut blade with a high tooth count.  It makes perfect crosscuts.  Perfect is the best you can do.  Get a rip blade with low tooth count.  It rips perfectly.  Perfect is as good as you can do.  And a dado set.  Why monkey around with a less than perfect combination blade that does lots of things OK, but nothing perfect?  I want perfect, not good enough.  Get a perfect rip blade.  Get a perfect crosscut blade.  And have perfection.  Don't bother with a mediocre combination blade.  Are you too lazy to spend one minute or less changing a blade?

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1008
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2019, 03:56 PM »
Are you too lazy to spend one minute or less changing a blade?

Unless someone is talking about production cuts or constantly working between different types of materials (ply vs. hardwood, vs laminate etc.), I agree we don't need too many rip/cross cut blades.

However, the reluctance to keep changing blades is not always a matter of laziness for some woodworkers. For instance, I constantly switch between rip cuts and cross cuts (using a cross-cut sled), and the combo option is the best, practical and the least inefficient approach. It is not just about the time spent on changing the blades, checking the clearance (for a SawStop), reinstalling the dust collection/riving knife, etc., but also about the interruption of the flow of work, which can be important for some of us.

Ideally, we could sort all the rips and cross-cuts, and use the best blade or tool (say, a Kapex for cross-cuts) for the job, but many of us amateurs don't work with an ideal shop set-up.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 09:39 PM by ChuckM »

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1009
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2019, 04:30 PM »
What does your one blade shop do when you send it out for sharpening?
What do you do when that one blade gets damaged ?

Hang out the "Gone Fishing" sign?

Or use the rip blade for crosscuts or the crosscut blade for rips.

What happens when you want to cut some cr@P plywood or rough lumber,
do you bring out your one perfect blade and screw it up on garbage cuts?
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3920
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2019, 05:41 PM »
Do you know someone who has only one blade?  [blink]

Offline Jesse Cloud

  • Posts: 1730
  • Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #23 on: May 08, 2019, 06:05 PM »
On the Forrest for Sawstop issue, I don't know if this is still relevant, but many years ago, soon after SS first came out our school switched over and the SS balked at some of the Forrest blades, wouldn't start up.  A little research showed that the Forrest blades were ever so slightly smaller than 10 inches and this caused SS's default settings to complain.

The SS manual shows how to adjust for this, but the school didn't want to (or couldn't afford to) swap out all its blade inventory for Forrest, nor was it practical to readjust the SS every time we changed blades.  So we stopped using the Forrest blades.

Like I say, this was a long time ago and SS and/or Forrest may have changed their specs since then...

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1009
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2019, 06:24 PM »
Do you know someone who has only one blade?  [blink]

No, an earlier post remarked that all you need is two blades, one for ripping and one for crosscuts, plus a dado set.
That, to me, is essentially one blade. One blade for each type of cut. And yes you can crosscut with a rip but the post was all about having one perfect blade for making perfect cuts of each type.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online RKA

  • Posts: 1570
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2019, 07:05 PM »
Thanks @Jesse Cloud , that is reassuring (well, for those of us that can afford the time to adjust the spacing without fear of being sued).  It sounds like the new model blade was intended to offer a plug and play solution for industrial and school environments.
-Raj

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3920
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2019, 11:06 PM »
Do you know someone who has only one blade?  [blink]

No, an earlier post remarked that all you need is two blades, one for ripping and one for crosscuts, plus a dado set.
That, to me, is essentially one blade. One blade for each type of cut. And yes you can crosscut with a rip but the post was all about having one perfect blade for making perfect cuts of each type.

I posted a comment similar to that.

Maybe you use the tablesaw a lot more than me. I might only need to make only one cut in a day. For example, rip a 2x4 down to 2-7/8” then square both ends. With a good combination blade the operation takes les than a minute. Changing the blade once at least doubles that time and and is conceptually disruptive.

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 279
Re: Table Saw Blade Recommendations
« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2019, 11:29 PM »
I think it just depends what you do and your acceptable tolerances for each project.

I build end grain cutting boards as gifts most years. When I do, I buy 50-100 board feet of maple, cherry and walnut and build a bunch at a time. When I am ready to cut the strips that I use for my initial glue ups I change out my combination blade and install a high quality rip blade. By doing so I am able to cut glue joint ready strips and avoid having to run each strip over the jointer. Then after my blanks are glued up I then cut strips that will be glued into the final product. Those are cross cuts and because of the multi wood glue up the cuts are prone to chipping. So I change that blade again to a pretty specialized laminate blade with a boat load of teeth. It creates beautiful chip free cuts and helps me eliminate a step that would result in a thinner finished cutting board. So for me the minute or two involved in a blade change is well worth it. Having said that there are plenty of times that I don’t need that level of perfection and when that’s the case I don’t change that 40 tooth combo blade either.