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Author Topic: Tool to help carry plywood:  (Read 56046 times)
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No Body

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« on: February 18, 2008, 07:38 PM »

Check out the video on carrying plywood:

« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 07:46 PM by Steve Pace » Logged

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Steve-CO

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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2008, 08:02 PM »

Nice of John Lucas to loan out one of his assistants.  Grin
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Qwas
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2008, 01:11 AM »

It's called a gorilla Gripper. You get them for about $50 from McFeely's, Amazon, and many other stores. The reviews are mixed; those that claim it didn't grip well say a newer model has come out but I don't know what is different in the new model.

Has any one here on the FOG used one?
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Markus K.

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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2008, 02:21 AM »

Very nice Tool - and the Gorilla Gripper is very nice, too  Grin Grin
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Frank Pellow

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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 02:47 PM »

I have a Gorilla Gripper and it works well with 4x8 foot sheet goods.  Grin But, because I am only 6 feet tall  Roll Eyes, it does not work well with 5x5 foot sheets.
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Dave Ronyak

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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 01:06 AM »

I have a Gorilla Gripper and it works well with 4x8 foot sheet goods.  Grin But, because I am only 6 feet tall  Roll Eyes, it does not work well with 5x5 foot sheets.

Frank,

Did your gripper come with a helper to demonstrate its ease of operation?  Seriously, I am only 5'8" so even 4x8 sheets might be a problem for me.  I would also think the arm motion required to pull the gripper/sheet up with your hand near your shoulder might create more strain than I want to put my arm/wrist/shoulder through.  I am thinking especially about having to move a sheet beginning with it laying flat on a floor.  I cannot imagine using it by myself for a full sheet of 3/4 MDF.

Dave R.
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Dan Clark

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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2008, 01:36 AM »

I have a Gorilla Gripper and it works well with 4x8 foot sheet goods.  Grin But, because I am only 6 feet tall  Roll Eyes, it does not work well with 5x5 foot sheets.


Frank,

Did your gripper come with a helper to demonstrate its ease of operation?  Seriously, I am only 5'8" so even 4x8 sheets might be a problem for me.  I would also think the arm motion required to pull the gripper/sheet up with your hand near your shoulder might create more strain than I want to put my arm/wrist/shoulder through.  I am thinking especially about having to move a sheet beginning with it laying flat on a floor.  I cannot imagine using it by myself for a full sheet of 3/4 MDF.

Dave R.


Dave,

I've always looked up to tall guys like you!   (Yes, I'm short.  But I play a great game of curb handball!)   

I have a Gorilla Gripper.   It's great for some things like pulling panels or drywall from a stack.   For lifting the buggers, it's NOT for the vertically challenged user.   That good looking honey in the video is probably over six feet tall!

For moving panels around over fairly flat floor or ground, I found the Telpro Troll to be MUCH better.    Even moving 4X8 sheets of 5/8" drywall with it is easy and no stress.  Just lift up a corner, slide the troll to the center of the panel, and walk around.  The handle is nice for lifting it 1/2" or so to swing it around a sharp corner.   For most corners, just rock it slightly on to one wheel and turn!  Great tool.

For stairs, the Troll and Gorilla Gripper is useless.   This drywall carrier is much better: http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Panel-Carry-Drywall-Carrier/dp/B000PCD1ZO/ref=sr_1_16?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1203658489&sr=1-16.

Regards,

Dan.

p.s., I love that GG video!
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Frank Pellow

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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2008, 09:39 AM »

I have a Gorilla Gripper and it works well with 4x8 foot sheet goods.  Grin But, because I am only 6 feet tall  Roll Eyes, it does not work well with 5x5 foot sheets.

Frank,

Did your gripper come with a helper to demonstrate its ease of operation?  Seriously, I am only 5'8" so even 4x8 sheets might be a problem for me.  I would also think the arm motion required to pull the gripper/sheet up with your hand near your shoulder might create more strain than I want to put my arm/wrist/shoulder through.  I am thinking especially about having to move a sheet beginning with it laying flat on a floor.  I cannot imagine using it by myself for a full sheet of 3/4 MDF.

Dave R.
I would think that If I were four inches shorter, I would have had trouble using it.  As the the 4x8 sheets of 3/4 inch MDF -yesterday, I moved four such sheets about 100 paces over a snowy icy pathway, including up a small two step set of stairs.  I didn't feal any strain.
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Dave Ronyak

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« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 10:59 PM »

Frank,

I'm going to try to remember not to ever get you P#$$^& at me!!  I have trouble dealing with 3/4 MDF sheets even at the lumber store, but I can handle the 3/5" birch ply Ok without and tools or help.

Dave R.

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Frank Pellow

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« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2008, 12:22 AM »

Don't worry Dave, I seldom get angry at anyone.  And, I can't remember the last time that I resorted to violence.   

I too, have struggled with 3/4 MDF in the past -but it is much easier to move using the Gorilla Gripper.  I still don't like MDF, but now I can move it.
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Dave Ronyak

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« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2008, 12:28 AM »

Thanks, Frank.  Actually, I think I have figured out how and why 3/4" MDF sheets are not a problem for you .  The answer was there all along in your Avatar - your little helper!

Dave R.
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wooden

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« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2008, 06:44 PM »

I'm only 5'6".  I don't have problems with 4x8 sheets and the Gorilla gripper.  It is much easier than body alone....albeit you are still needing the strength to lift 75 - 100 pounds.
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Michael Kellough

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« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 07:37 PM »

The Gorilla gripper is great for manhandling sheets but I don't like it for carring heavy sheets very far. I prefer to carry sheets using an ordinary drywall sheet carrier. I came to that conclusion after moving a bunch of 1" MDF that wouldn't fit into the channel of my drywall sheet carrier and I had to use the Gorilla. I don't think my shoulder evolved to carry really heavy stuff with my arm cranked in like that. But the Gorilla is great for lighter sheets.  In the video the guy is shown taking pieces of softwood ply roof sheathing up a ladder and it seems nearly perfect for that job.

I get best use from my Gorilla (since I'm not a roofer) getting a stack of stuff in position to carry with the drywall carrier. The Gorilla makes it easy to grab a sheet of horizontally stacked 3/4" MDF and tilt it up into vertical position on blocks so that the drywall carrier can slip under and I can carry the panel in the more comfortable extended arm position.
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tallgrass

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« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2008, 08:46 PM »

i love the one that i have. i am 6.4 and it a great deal easier to use it rather than with out it. i went to where they make it (it is about 34 min from me) they were nice and the tool worked well there as well as at my place. it does take a little practice to get it down but it is not hard. as mentioned you still need to bring enough beef to the barbecue to get it done but i love it.
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joraft

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« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 09:20 PM »


It's called a gorilla Gripper...

Has any one here on the FOG used one?



I just got one a few weeks ago, and I like it a lot. The Gorilla is really great for pulling sheets off a stack and placing them on a cart.

I also have a "hook" type carrier that goes under the panel, I've had it for years, and I'll still use that for carrying longer distances.


John

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Eli

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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2008, 06:05 PM »

A no tech plywood carrier can be made from a piece of line 8.5 to 9 feet long. Put a bowline or eye splice in both ends and hook the resultant loops on the bottom corners of a sheet. Grab the line in the middle with one hand and steady the top of the sheet with the other.
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SRSemenza
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« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2008, 05:49 PM »

A no tech plywood carrier can be made from a piece of line 8.5 to 9 feet long. Put a bowline or eye splice in both ends and hook the resultant loops on the bottom corners of a sheet. Grab the line in the middle with one hand and steady the top of the sheet with the other.

Hi,

       Could even add one of those handles that fit the wire handles of five gallon buckets to reduce the line cutting into the hand.


Seth
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Eli

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« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2008, 11:21 PM »

Yes. You could.
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Kelly

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« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2008, 04:25 PM »

My husband Walter invented and has patented a new tool (handle) for lifting and carrying plywood, drywall and other flat sheets.

It doesn't have limitations like the Gorilla Gripper (works for any size sheet and does not matter how tall or short you are) -- nor is it made of cheap plastic like the Stanley tool. We are now getting quotes for manufacturing. I will post a few pictures of the tool in the next day or so. I will be handling the advertising and marketing for the product and would like your feedback. I'm building the website now. We will be able to take orders shortly.

The tool is made of highly durable, steel tubing, has a comfortable grip and has a protective covering at the base so not to damage drywall when carrying. I'd like to hear your comments.
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Ned

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« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2008, 05:39 PM »

Welcome Kelly,

We're certainly open to invention here, but your note belongs in the Sales Zone along with other dealers.

I've sent a notice to the Admin, not to complain, but so that he can set you up with the right kind of membership here.

Please post photos, we'd like to see the tool!

Ned
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GreenGA

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JR


« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2008, 07:08 PM »

Last year we were sheetrocking a kitchen and found something at the Borg (Orange).  It worked well, cost about 8 bucks and could carry two sheets of 5/8 rock.  IF you were strong enough to carry two sheets by yourself. Smiley

It works by placing the sheet into the grip of the "hand;e", lifting everything and walking away.

I do not recall who manufacturers it.
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« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2008, 05:07 PM »

Eli's line idea is fine if the sheet is already out in the open.  If you've got to pull a sheet from a vertical stack then it wouldn't work (you'd have to manhandle it down and then hook up the string for carrying).  I bring my Gorilla Gripper to the wood store when picking up sheet goods... just hook it on an edge and yank it out of the stack (really nice for melamine, fine plywood, or other smooth / slippery material that's hard to grab).  I've also used it to drag sheet goods up a ladder.  I would worry about the string catching / hooking something when used for that kind of application.  The handle is very comfortable and you can grab 2 sheets at once (good for <1/2" material).
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natsign

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« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2009, 02:25 PM »

There is a new product out that works very well for carrying heavy sheets. I use it in the sign business and it has worked great. It is called J Handles www.jhandles.com
 1. The gorilla gripper is a single purpose tool.  It is designed to lift drywall or plywood sheets and thats it.  The jhandle can be used to move many other items such as doors, cabinets, wall sections, fence panels, sign panels and especially items too heavy for one person.   The bottom line is that almost any item with a vertical flat surface can be lifted with the jhandle.
 
2. The jhandle keeps the user in an ergonomic position all  the time.  It also allows the user to see where he's going and to have the balance to maneuver around objects safely.  While the gorilla gripper is definately more ergonomic than carrying by hand it is still a bit awkward and somewhat limits the line of site of the user.  The gorilla gripper also forces the user to balance the material (front to back) while carrying it.  When the users are on opposite sides of the product the jhandle ballances the product for one hand carrying.
 
3. The gorilla gripper sells for $49.95 (some at $47.95) for just one gripper.  The jhandle sells in a set of two for $24.95. It is also a tool with no moving parts so it is a more reliable product than others. With more functionality and a lower price it should be more a good solution for most.
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Jimhart

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« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2009, 02:47 PM »

Seems the company was unable to afford www.jhandles.com or they let it expire. Just a parked ad page that doesn't seem to want to redirect you to the product.

here they are on Amazon; http://www.amazon.com/JHandles-JH-326-Lifting-Handles/dp/B00006FRJR

Most of the reviews are from 2003.

Jim
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GreenGA

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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2009, 02:51 PM »

While the J Handles seem effective, they require two people when moving panels; which may be the situation in most instances.  The carrying thingy I found at The Borg needs only one person.
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Coming Attractions: Workcenter, Domino XL Kit, Carvex 420 & Accessory Kit, more 'tainers.
greg mann

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« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2009, 02:52 PM »

I used to have a couple tools that worked great for moving plywood. They had been laying around collecting dust for 15-20 years or so not doing much of anything before I got them to working right. They worked great for a year or two, then they moved out.  Roll Eyes
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Greg Mann
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wnagle

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« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2009, 05:11 PM »

I use the gorilla gripper all the time to move my ply.  And to get it onto my cutting table I made a J hook like the one they sell for your table saw.  I made mine out of some scrap OSB.  It works like a dream.  I can flip a full sheet of ply or mdf onto my cutting table without any help and without any strain.

And since I cut my sheets to precise dimension with my TS55, I never have to re-carry the pieces to the table saw like I did before I had Festool in my shop.  One of these days I will add some pics of my cutting table.  It collapses to about the size of a 4X4 by 8 feet long... only weighs a couple pounds... and easily supports a couple thousand pounds... and has my j hook attached for one handed lifting of the sheets to the table.  Plus it goes together in a couple minutes from storing in the corner to full function.  And the best part I made it from scraps or maybe $20.00 worth of lumber.  I use it in my parking garage since it is so easy to set up/take down and use.

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Carryme

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« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2009, 05:22 PM »

Just stumbled across this post.  The correct web address for JHandles is www.jhandles.net . The old address is from the prior owners of the company.  We purcheased JHandles Inc. in March of 09 and since they had let the address expire we had to use the .net address.

Mike
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jmbfestool

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« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2009, 10:15 AM »

It's called a gorilla Gripper. You get them for about $50 from McFeely's, Amazon, and many other stores. The reviews are mixed; those that claim it didn't grip well say a newer model has come out but I don't know what is different in the new model.

Has any one here on the FOG used one?


I mite get one! I did think yeah grip could be a problem but then I thought of many ways I could solve the problem if it comes to it  so that the device would never slip.
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bonesbr549

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« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2009, 10:43 AM »

I'm a one man shop now that my Son is grown (it was great to have the extra set of hands).  I don't do a lot with plywood, but a 3/4" whole sheet is heavy IMO.  I picked one of the gorilla gripprs up on sale at woodcraft and that is one handy little sucker.  I can move and handle a whole sheet of 3/4" ply with no real issues.  Niffty little tool.   
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