Author Topic: Unconventional woodworking glove options  (Read 1740 times)

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Online ear3

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Unconventional woodworking glove options
« on: November 10, 2017, 03:02 PM »
I imagine others are similar, but i rely a a tremendous amount on tactile sensation with all aspects of carpentry, and have always found it difficult to intolerable to wear gloves while in the shop. But this is responsible for a fair amount of misery in the winter months (my shop is unheated), or even foregoing woodworking altogether on excessively cold days, since my poor circulation causes my hands to go numb at the right temperature.

Watching some football recently it struck me that the gloves used by quarterbacks and receivers might be a viable alternative to the gloves you find at home centers -- I mean, if the guys who are making mIllions of dollars from their hands are willing to entrust that to a pair of gloves, then that should be good enough for my woodworking.

So I went over to dick's sporting goods next to my local home depot and browsed their football glove section. Unfortunately I found that most of them had a coating that was too stiff for me (though they were out of stock of some others that looked more promising, and which maybe I'll look into in the future). But then I went and looked at the rack of their generic sport outdoor gloves, and I ended up getting this pair of North Face ones, called e-tip, because they enable use of touch screen phones ( in fact, I'm typing this whole thing on my phone wearing the gloves).

So far they are brilliant. I've warn them while operating the table saw, the miter saw, drilling, sanding, and assembly. I can almost -- not quite but almost -- even roll a cigarette with them on, which should give you some idea of how much delicate tactile sensation they permit. Since they are only rated for moderately cold weather, I will have to see how they protect my hands in truly cold temperatures. But so far I'm really really pleased.

The only downside is cost. They were $45, which is more than I've ever spent on a pair of gloves in my life.



« Last Edit: November 10, 2017, 03:08 PM by ear3 »
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Offline DB10

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2017, 05:57 PM »
I also like to feel the material I'm working with especially when sanding but in colder climates the cold can be a real pain literally, if you suffer from arthritis it can get missable. I use to have Fingerless gloves but never found a pair that would hold up for very long in everyday use. Let us know if these gloves hold up over the winter.

Offline hopper

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2017, 09:11 AM »
Please don't wear gloves when operating power equipment. Especially the table saw and drill press.  Can be hazardous to your health not to mention your fingers.

Offline bnaboatbuilder

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2017, 09:32 AM »
I use MaxiFlex Ultimate for metalworking. They even work on iphone screens. Protection and dexterity, can't be beat. They last a long time, easily washed. I buy them from ebay in smaller quantity. Amazon sells them in packs of 12 pairs which is way more than I need, 3-4 pairs last for several years.

- John

Offline antss

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2017, 11:18 AM »
hopper , what in the world are you talking about ?

Gloves are a requirement at many industrial shops.  Besides,  ear's gloves are quite form fitting and loose material isn't likely to get caught in a moving tool. 

It's not like he's wearing something liek these:
https://www.mcrsafety.com/safety-equipment/gloves/1400a

you'll notice the business that co. is in too.

Offline Bert Vanderveen

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2017, 01:35 PM »
I would imagine that some gloves like the ones gardeners and ironworkers (welding!) use may be unfit for doing woodworking because the are too loosefitting and give not enough control, but the gloves we are talking about here are a whole different category.
I use gloves all the time, different types for all kinds of jobs. Have to after pushing around a mouse for thirty years : ) -- callouses in the wrong spots.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Online Tinker

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2017, 02:21 PM »
When I was 38, i would work all winter bare handed.  Of course, my finger tips were always covered with either adhesive tape or friction tape. My hands were always full of cracks, but I would wear out a pair  of gloves before noon. Now, I am 39 and and am a lot more delicate. I keep gloves in my truck, gloves in my car, gloves in the house and gloves in my shop.  As Bert says, different gloves for different jobs.  When I first started wearing gloves, I wore only unlined.  I now wear mostly Lined gloves. When i get to be 40, i will stay inside in the cold weather.  ::)
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online ear3

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2017, 04:42 PM »
No worries with these gloves since they are skin tight.

BTW today has been the first truly cold day in NYC, and so far the gloves are keeping my hands suitably warm working in the shop.  I'm going to test out whether they work while handplaning a bit later.

Please don't wear gloves when operating power equipment. Especially the table saw and drill press.  Can be hazardous to your health not to mention your fingers.
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Online Peter Halle

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2017, 05:20 PM »
Gloves or no gloves is not a debate that I will venture into.  BUT if you wear gloves of any kind and are using a drill of any brand to drive screws and you have to start a screw with a gloved hand holding a screw - pay attention.

Lesson learned on more than one occasion.

Peter
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Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2017, 05:46 PM »
hopper , what in the world are you talking about ?

Gloves are a requirement at many industrial shops.  Besides,  ear's gloves are quite form fitting and loose material isn't likely to get caught in a moving tool. 

It's not like he's wearing something liek these:
https://www.mcrsafety.com/safety-equipment/gloves/1400a

you'll notice the business that co. is in too.

Well actually gloves are not used where I work when operating saws. They are mandatory when carrying and stocking timber, but when sawing there is a danger a gloved hand will be further dragged into the saw blade.
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Offline antss

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2017, 07:18 PM »
Gloves or no gloves is not a debate that I will venture into.  BUT if you wear gloves of any kind and are using a drill of any brand to drive screws and you have to start a screw with a gloved hand holding a screw - pay attention.

Lesson learned on more than one occasion.

Peter

Just another reason to have the correct size pilot hole drilled before starting to drive that screw.   [big grin]


Untidy,  SawStop would eliminate that possibility but I don't disagree.


Everything is balance or trade off.  Hand tools are generally safer than power tools , but we don't think twice about using them or the increased risk.  Short sleeves would bee better than long ones around that same drill press and table saw, but I bet everyone here has used those wearing long one at some point or another.  It'd also be safer working without your wedding bands too. Do y'all remove those when working in the shop or factory ?

Probably not.  We all make tradeoffs in terms of safety everyday.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2017, 07:25 PM by antss »

Offline Job and Knock

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2017, 05:56 AM »
Just another reason to have the correct size pilot hole drilled before starting to drive that screw.   [big grin]
Doesn't solve the problem of screws with burrs on the edges, though. This occurs more often than I like, even with the "good stuff" like Hilti drywalls

Untidy,  SawStop would eliminate that possibility but I don't disagree.
If or when they get round to making a professional panel saw (think Altendorf), or spindle moulder, or drill press, or anything else I'd actually want to use other than a 10in home hobby workshop saw

Please don't wear gloves when operating power equipment. Especially the table saw and drill press.  Can be hazardous to your health not to mention your fingers.
I concur. It's the danger of the material being caught in a drill bit or cutter/blade or snagging on a burr  on a screw and then having the finger/hand drawn-in which is the issue. The end result is anything from painful to at worst amputation. To a hobbyist that's a personal choice but in a business environment it will almost certainly breach the risk assessments for many wood machining tasks (at least in the UK) - AFAIK gloves in engineering workshops are often worn to reduce the incidence of dermatitis through contact with coolants, oils, etc. Personally I wear fingerless carpenter's gloves (deWalt, Stanley, etc) which effectively protect the palms, backs of the hands and upper fingers whilst leaving the fingers open. I've tried riggers gloves (which have only the thumb and first two fingers exposed) but they really wear out far too fast in heavy trade use. When it's really cold I wear a Makita heated jacket which seems to help me keep my body a bit warmer (an oddly my fingers, too)
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 06:04 AM by Job and Knock »
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Offline Bert Vanderveen

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2017, 07:45 AM »
When it's really cold I wear a Makita heated jacket which seems to help me keep my body a bit warmer (an oddly my fingers, too)

Yeah — that is why blood circulates (and to feed and oxygenate, but who cares about that?).
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

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Online Tinker

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2017, 08:26 AM »
When it's really cold I wear a Makita heated jacket which seems to help me keep my body a bit warmer (an oddly my fingers, too)

The reason I could work thru cold winter days.  I kept my body warm with many layers covering my body as well as arms, legs and feet. The only parts of my body that were not encased in many layers were my hands. I kept moving.  If laying bricks, the bricks were warmed. We even heated the water for mixing the mortar.  I did wear gloves sometimes when using concrete blocks or stone. But for the most part, because I kept my body, arms, legs and feet warm, I was able to leave gloves in the truck. When taking a break, I did put on mittens.

For my feet, I wore big 5 or 6 buckle galaushes. The guys on most jobs would kid me about "the mickey mouse boots". One buddy told me I wore those monster boots so when I fell of of the scaffold I would always land on my feet. OOPS! That is getting off topic
Tinker
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Offline hopper

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2017, 09:13 AM »
Antss,  it is your choice to wear "proper" gloves or not.  I for one will not wear gloves while operating any power tool with a rotating blade or tool. I am 71 years old and have been in the woodworking/construction industry for over 50 years. (still have all my fingers although they have been cut quite a few times).

Offline antss

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2017, 11:31 AM »
Quote
Doesn't solve the problem of screws with burrs on the edges, though. This occurs more often than I like, even with the "good stuff" like Hilti drywalls

Of course it does.  The screw will properly seat in the hole and stay there without you having to hold it at all.  You don't even need to touch it with your hand at all after place it in there.  But it's certainly faster to not drill a pilot hole. 

 But again, it boils down to the personal choice I spoke of earlier.  The one we all make about safety and comfort everyday.  You prefer those burs nick up your fingers instead of snagging on a glove.  Perfectly reasonable choice.    Not one I'd make nor do I experience burs on the screws I use either so it wouldn't be an issue even if I were holding the screw with my gloved hand.  Many make the choice not to drill the pilot hole in favor of the time savings.  Choice.

Quote
It's the danger of the material being caught in a drill bit or cutter/blade or snagging on a burr  on a screw and then having the finger/hand drawn-in which is the issue

Yup, same as having your sleeve caught or your watch or ring or even long hair.  All of which there are solutions and precautions for that many don't follow and don't think twice about.

Quote
If or when they get round to making a professional panel saw
There was rumor earlier this year or late last that one was in the works under a license agreement.  As I recall , one of the biggies decided to finally bite on the concept.

Quote
Antss,  it is your choice to wear "proper" gloves or not.  I for one will not wear gloves while operating any power tool with a rotating blade or tool.

Of course it is. Your comment was too drive by to be of much use though.  ear3 didn't just drop out of high school to join the trades and woodwork is inherently dangerous.  So, a "don't do that it could be dangerous" comment is kinda preachy.  Lots of guys have decades of experience around here.

Don't get indignant because some guys choose a technique or tool that doesn't work for you.  Are you always wearing short sleeves around your saw and drill press ?  Are you guys removing your jewelry too ?  I know some old timers that will talk your ear off about how dangerous that stuff is around woodworking machines too.

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2017, 03:14 PM »
Gloves or no gloves is not a debate that I will venture into.  BUT if you wear gloves of any kind and are using a drill of any brand to drive screws and you have to start a screw with a gloved hand holding a screw - pay attention.

Lesson learned on more than one occasion.

Peter
Just another reason to have the correct size pilot hole drilled before starting to drive that screw.   [big grin]
Having driven 10's of thousands of screws into underlayment, subfloors, etc. there is no way cost effectively pre-drill, and even using GRK torx head screws one hand MUST hold the screw until it is started. My hand would be sore as can be after a couple hundred screws let alone driving 1,000's per day. Using Atlas gloves I get about half a day before they are worn out, and I keep switching which hand is driving the screws. Yes they do catch on the glove once they are worn down, but they also tear apart. Chances of the impact ripping a finger off are far lower than accidentally driving a driver tip thru your own hand. Point being I can not really see a serious injury from doing so, but can not drive screws without gloves or I will have raw fingers.

These are what I use, and they also have an insulated pair. I use them from caving, to tree cutting and forestry work, and are my go to glove for construction. Want more dexterity...cut the tips of the fingers off. They are washable, but you must air dry them. The key with gloves is how they fit. I find most people wear gloves way to loose, then complain about dexterity. The fingers need to be tight in the ends of the glove tips.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007VR8X2W/ref=psdc_553608_t2_B000RMDWL0

Insulated pair.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KQ1AR74/ref=pd_luc_rh_bxgy_02_01_t_img_lh?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Online rvieceli

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2017, 03:39 PM »
@Peter_C Since you have the experience with the screws, I have wondered about those collated screw guns. It would seem that they would be appropriate for what you are doing. Do they not function well enough for you to use one?

Thanks Ron

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2017, 03:45 PM »
@Peter_C Since you have the experience with the screws, I have wondered about those collated screw guns. It would seem that they would be appropriate for what you are doing. Do they not function well enough for you to use one?

Thanks Ron
If I could buy high quality screws for them yes. Haven't found a local supplier that sells more than dry wall quality screws, or I would quickly invest in a Festool, Senco, Makita, or Milwaukee screw gun. Oh how much I would love to get off my knees. I swear the next big floor job I am buying Proknees.

Offline Gregor

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2017, 05:35 PM »
If I could buy high quality screws for them yes.
What kind (and dimension) of screws do you need?
I'm quite confident that the kind you need is available in your place, if not stocked as standard at your local supplier they might be able (and willing) to order them for you. If nothing helps we have the internet and parcel services these days.

A kind word combined with a polite threat is at times more effective than a kind word alone, so (most likely) your local supplier can be convinced to offer them to you: so you don't have to buy them from a faceless box pusher with an internet shop instead... that also offers competitive pricing on other stuff you buy on a regular basis at your local place...  since you would have to pay for shipping anyway... and there still is so much space in the box... would be a shame...

I think you get the basic idea for a talk with your local supplier.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 06:12 PM by Gregor »

Offline Pike_101

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2017, 06:13 PM »
My goto and recommendation would be Panther-Guard 8 Mil Flock-Lined gloves.

http://www.galeton.com/panther-guard-8-mil-black-flock-lined-nitrile-gloves/12245-product/

These do a remarkable job of giving the hands just enough added protection to keep warm, while not sacrificing any dexterity as they act like a second skin. You can even wear them under a heavier glove when it is really cold, and pull off the outer glove when you need to do finer work. At less than $20 for 25 pairs they are very inexpensive, and last longer than one expects.

I use these for work in the cold, cutting up and handling near frozen meat- which chills the hands quickly, and have found them priceless on winter adventures in sub-zero climates.

While I would not advocate one way or the other about using gloves with tools as all situations require different approaches, at least with these there is little risk of them catching or dragging your hand into a spinning tool. One certainly should not underestimate the strength of the tiny fibers that make up most fabrics and what can happen when they get caught in a rotating assembly.

Offline DB10

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2017, 06:14 PM »
If I could buy high quality screws for them yes.
What kind (and dimension) of screws do you need?
They would need to be between 50 - 65mm, depending on floor thickness of between 19 -24mm. Screws need to be self driving needle point and rib head.

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2017, 06:45 PM »
@Peter_C Since you have the experience with the screws, I have wondered about those collated screw guns. It would seem that they would be appropriate for what you are doing. Do they not function well enough for you to use one?

Thanks Ron
If I could buy high quality screws for them yes. Haven't found a local supplier that sells more than dry wall quality screws, or I would quickly invest in a Festool, Senco, Makita, or Milwaukee screw gun. Oh how much I would love to get off my knees. I swear the next big floor job I am buying Proknees.

Hi!

You might want to look into Adunox - But I'm not sure they have made their way over the big pond as of yet...

http://adunox.com/en/

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Gregor

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Re: Unconventional woodworking glove options
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2017, 07:07 PM »
You might want to look into Adunox - But I'm not sure they have made their way over the big pond as of yet...
Which (not having made it over the pond, yet) might in itself offer an interesting business opportunity, as most likely you are not alone with this specific problem in search for a solution...

On further research: Adunox seems to have created http://www.starbornindustries.com/smart-bit-wood-product - that site also offers screws as a collated version: http://www.starbornindustries.com/collated-screw-system-product - according to the comment regarding your knees you might find the following PDF interesting: https://s3.amazonaws.com/starborn/resources/pdfs/000/000/102/original/Starborn-Guide_Collated.pdf

Sorry for the derail.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 07:44 PM by Gregor »