Author Topic: What else do you buy?  (Read 17021 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline John Langevin

  • Posts: 245
  • Springfield, MA
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2008, 12:32 PM »
   I am a QUALITY NUT having been a Quality Engineer/Manager in aerospace for my most of my life after learning gunmaking, toolmaking, and inspection. I sometimes have to rein myself in when purchasing different things to keep from going overboard.
   I am especially willing to spend extra for quality for things I hold in my hands: cameras (Canon A-1, Rollei), firearms (Belgian Browning/FN, Sig-Sauer), fishing tackle (Quick Reels/St. Croix rods), optics (Leupold, Zeiss, Leica) etc. The food and drink I put in my mouth ( Fine California, AUS/NZ wines, French Champagne, Filet Mignon etc.) In other words things that delight my senses. These things are a pleasure to just look at, hold in your hands, use or ingest for sensory gratification.
   With the tools, cameras, firearms etc. the quality of design and material, excellence in manufacture and superior function give me confidence that I will obtain the desired result which diminishes any apprehension about the task at hand.
   When teaching management students about quality it is disappointing to me how many of them really don't know what it is. The definition can be worded in different ways to describe the particular topic being discussed but it really comes down to:
     Fitness for Use/Conformance to ALL REQUIREMENTS.
   Far from being wealthy I must be convinced that the extra money really buys me quality, value, performance, and durability. it kills me to see what some people are willing to pay for a Rolex watch when an Omega is actually a better watch. To each his own perception of quality and the value equation.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2008, 12:32 PM by John Langevin »
Practicing Mediocrity Never Begets Perfection

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline ShawnN

  • Posts: 2
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2008, 01:46 PM »
Whatever product that I can get the most quality for the money. Sometimes that's not possible for me due to extravagent prices. I own a John Deere lawn tractor (not the cheap versions being sold at Home Depot,...), Nice camera setup for land and SCUBA use, home appliances/electronics, furniture (that I didn't build myself), quality wood, quality finishing products, ....

Offline Robert Robinson

  • Posts: 722
  • southern Indiana, U.S.A.
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2008, 05:44 PM »
here lately it has been gas. thats about all I can afford.
TS-55, FS-KS angle unit, 55 inch guide rail, Domino (pin style), 3 Domino systainer assortments(one sipo set),Multi-position Guide Stop 20, Domiplate , PSB-300, FOGtainer 4, CXS set

Offline tschallb

  • Posts: 1
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2008, 07:20 PM »
Bicycles.  Huge difference in quality between the low end components and the high-end.  Once you try DuraAce (Shimano) or Record (Campy) you don't go back even though it pains me everytime I buy consumables (chains, cassettes, pads, etc).  Frame materials are an entirely different rat hole...

Tim
Riding in the rain in PDX...
 

Offline Ned

  • Posts: 1147
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2008, 07:31 PM »
Bicycles.  Huge difference in quality between the low end components and the high-end.  Once you try DuraAce (Shimano) or Record (Campy) you don't go back even though it pains me everytime I buy consumables (chains, cassettes, pads, etc).  Frame materials are an entirely different rat hole...

Tim
Riding in the rain in PDX...
 

Yeah, Tim, and like so many other top-end products, they don't look that much different from the lesser stuff.  No one who hasn't tried them can understand why they're worth the big bucks.  You can't convince them by talking, in fact, you may not be able to put into words the difference.  But difference there is.

BTW, that's why Festools have to be demonstrated, and test drives allowed.

Oh, and welcome to FOG!

Ned

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3611
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2008, 08:45 PM »
Bicycles.  Huge difference in quality between the low end components and the high-end.  Once you try DuraAce (Shimano) or Record (Campy) you don't go back even though it pains me everytime I buy consumables (chains, cassettes, pads, etc).  Frame materials are an entirely different rat hole...

Tim
Riding in the rain in PDX...
 

Yeah, Tim, and like so many other top-end products, they don't look that much different from the lesser stuff.  No one who hasn't tried them can understand why they're worth the big bucks.  You can't convince them by talking, in fact, you may not be able to put into words the difference.  But difference there is.

BTW, that's why Festools have to be demonstrated, and test drives allowed.

Oh, and welcome to FOG!

Ned


Anyone who can make this distinction (and I think that includes everyone reading this, in the FOG)
is just a test drive away from upgrading to a Mac.  ;)

Offline Ned

  • Posts: 1147
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2008, 08:50 PM »
Anyone who can make this distinction (and I think that includes everyone reading this, in the FOG)
is just a test drive away from upgrading to a Mac.  ;)

Matthew, Matthew, he's trolling again!  :D

Offline charlie b

  • Posts: 34
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2008, 06:58 PM »
AKEDA Dovetail Jig
Unlike the DOMINO which looks like a
familiar tool but definitely isn't, the
AKEDA DT jig doesn't look like any
of the other dovetail jigs.  Because
it's design were based on additional
criteria overlooked by other dovetail
jig makers it looks Unfamiliar and
therefore suspect - why buy a pig
in a poke?  It does exactly the same
job as the others, only it does it
much easier.  But because it doesn't
have all the levers and screws and
sliding parts and vernier scales etc.
(because the design eliminated all
that) and doesn't weigh 60 0r 70
pounds and doesn't come with a
manual - that's 163 pages of 8.5x11,
because that isn't needed in order
to cut dovetails with this jig - folks
shy away from The Unknown.

If you've not seen the AKEDA or
any details about it, here's the
URL to more than you probably
ever wanted to know.

http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/AKEDAdtJig/AKEDAdovetailJig1.html

The Glen-Drake Tite-Mark(tm) is another
 "more expensive than" tool.  Looks like
several other, less expensive. wheeled
marking tools - but does what they do
so much more easily and accurately
- AND does things the others can't.

http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/MT/MTprimer10b.html

I'd also have to put JoinTech's Cabinet
Maker System (router table fence and
precision positionable fence device) in
this catagory of "apparently more
expensive" catagory.  It doesn't look
like a "regular" router table fence
but it does everything a "regular" fence
can do PLUS a heck of a lot more - and
do all of them more safely because
it also has easily replaceable, and
inexpensive, zero clearance fence
inserts.

http://www.jointech.com/

Oh - and I can't forget a good dovetail
saw.  the Lie-Nielsen saw, while
considerably more expensive than a
$10 "gents saw" you CAN make work
fairly well, comes ready to go and
everything about it is there to make
it easier to cut a straight line - where
YOU want it.  You still have to do some
work as well, but you won't have to
fight the saw to do it.  The same goes
for a good japanese dovetail saw - that
works on the pull stroke - like the Toshio
Odate dovetail saw.

I've bought a fair number of tools, and
spent more than a fair number of dollars
on them.  I've learned that when it comes
to tools - you can do your homework and
pay "more" up front in order to avoid
"paying" more later - in frustration and
aggravation along with parts you made
that you can't use - read "useable wood
into scrap wood".  You're gonna pay one
way or the other so why not spend the
money on a tool or machine that will
do what you want to do easily - and
pocket the time saved and use it for
DOING and not SET UP or COMPENSATING.

This approach has a secondary benefit.
When I find a tool that does something
I can already do - but lets me do it with
out much frustration or drama - I get
it. Then I find a woodworker with more
passion and talent than disposable
income and I give him or her the tool
I upgraded from.  Makes life a little
easier for them and I don't have to
hassle with selling or trading it.

The added fun of the confusion this
transaction causes the recipient
"You're GIVING this to me?  Why?
- Hey!  Where'd he go?  Who was that
masked man?" And occassionally
throwing in "Hi-Ho-Silver" as I depart
- well THAT is priceless.  Try it -
it's really a lot of fun!

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2008, 07:08 PM »
That does sound like fun. But how do you recognize a poor, passionate, talented woodworker walking along the street? Sawdust in his hair?  :D

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 8646
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2008, 10:35 PM »


Seth,
I remember when Nakamichi equipment was about the best.  Is it still made today?

Tom.

Hi,

         Nope, various trials and tribulations. Bankrupt in 2002.   I have the CR-7A, and RX-505. Both the top in those particular lines. The CR-7A is  one notch below the Dragon. But I prefer the CR-7A. The Dragon actually has a bit too much adjustment for me and it lacked a couple nice features compared to the CR-7A.  Funny story goes with those- I bought them both on the same day from the same dealer.   Way back when I was in high school, but had a job and money to burn.   I paid cash, the salesmans jaw  just about hit the floor when I said "I'll take both" and started counting out hundreds.  Aaaah, those were the days :)

Seth
« Last Edit: April 11, 2008, 10:39 PM by semenza »

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 8646
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2008, 10:42 PM »
          About 20 or so years ago I was into high end stereo equipment (still have in use too)  Nakamichi, MacIntosh, Adcom, KEF, etc.
Seth
             

Could not let this one go by as it appears you have been brainwashed by Apple.  It's "McIntosh"! (I have a ton of it downstairs)  8)

Hi,

      Yes, MC not Mac  :-[   Been a while since I actually read the label. :)

Seth

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 8646
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2008, 10:47 PM »
Bicycles.  Huge difference in quality between the low end components and the high-end.  Once you try DuraAce (Shimano) or Record (Campy) you don't go back even though it pains me everytime I buy consumables (chains, cassettes, pads, etc).  Frame materials are an entirely different rat hole...

Tim
Riding in the rain in PDX...
 

Hi,

         Yeah, I almost forgot!   Bicycles.   I never got to the real top of the line on components but what I had was pretty good and definetly a noticable difference from the low end. I had Shimano 600 on a Canondale frame.

        BTW a welcome is in order for you  as a first time poster.  :)  But your first post really should have been about Festool ;)


Seth

Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #42 on: April 13, 2008, 12:30 PM »
Seth,
I remember those days too.  No expenses, a part time job and saved up and paid cash for whatever I wanted (and complained when gas hit $1.00 a gallon!).  Now it seems the paycheck and bills just about balance each other out.

Tom.

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #43 on: April 13, 2008, 12:41 PM »
Another thing I'm willing to spend money on is outdoor clothes. I mostly buy Patagonia, though REI is great for everyday stuff. The Patagonia stuff costs a fortune, but - like Festool - it really works!

Offline Ned

  • Posts: 1147
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #44 on: April 13, 2008, 01:04 PM »
Another thing I'm willing to spend money on is outdoor clothes.

In that case, poto, check out Tilley hats and other stuff.

Tilley and Lee Valley are my two favorite Canadian businesses.  Both are exellent.

Ned

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2008, 11:48 AM »
Hey Ned - I'm totally with you! I grew up in Canada, and go to Lee Valley every time I visit my parents. My regular Christmas gift from my father is some tools from my long wish list at Lee Valley. As for Tilley hats, I've been wearing them for years. Remember the ad where the Tilley hat went through an elephant (I think at the Toronto zoo)? Twice?  :D :D


Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1842
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2008, 12:07 PM »
I'm not sure how we got this far without the Big Green Egg being mentioned but we just used ours for the first time this weekend. Counting the cost of the unit, amortizing those first steaks was expensive, but the next ones will only be half as much.  ;D  These are first rate cookers and a joy to use.

On another note, while I have built three skin-on-frame kayaks, I will be taking delivery on a Greenland Style wooden kayak in July after a three year wait. It is being made by a fellow named Mark Rogers at Superior Kayaks in Wisconsin. He is an extraordinary craftsman who also understands traditional kayak design and is a highly skilled paddler to boot. In addition to very high performance his boats have the workmanship of fine furniture.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Ned

  • Posts: 1147
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2008, 12:10 PM »
Remember the ad where the Tilley hat went through an elephant (I think at the Toronto zoo)? Twice?  :D :D

Truly wash and wear.   8)

Offline Gene Howerton

  • Posts: 107
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #48 on: April 14, 2008, 02:09 PM »
I have the Sonos music system in the house and wired to the work shop and it connects to Rhapsody and Pandora Music.  That give we 4.0 million songs to choose from and custom radio stations.  It is the one device that I use every day whether working in the shop or just listening to music.

Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #49 on: April 17, 2008, 04:48 PM »
Ned,
Which Tilley hats do you wear?  I visited their website and they offer many different styles.  I like the insect repellant hat, I wonder if it really works?  I get a lot of insect bites when I go taking pictures at parks.

Tom.

Offline Dan Uhlir

  • Posts: 138
    • www.danuhlir.com
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #50 on: April 17, 2008, 06:07 PM »


  Motorcycle, I'm out.
                     Dan

Offline Dave Rudy

  • Posts: 771
  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #51 on: April 17, 2008, 11:59 PM »
Tilley hats and other stuff

Ned


Tilley hats are fantastic.  Still have mine after about 20 years.  Used to wear it racing sailboats on San Francisco Bay.

Offline Robert Robinson

  • Posts: 722
  • southern Indiana, U.S.A.
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #52 on: April 18, 2008, 05:03 AM »
I'm not sure how we got this far without the Big Green Egg being mentioned but we just used ours for the first time this weekend. Counting the cost of the unit, amortizing those first steaks was expensive, but the next ones will only be half as much.  ;D  These are first rate cookers and a joy to use.

On another note, while I have built three skin-on-frame kayaks, I will be taking delivery on a Greenland Style wooden kayak in July after a three year wait. It is being made by a fellow named Mark Rogers at Superior Kayaks in Wisconsin. He is an extraordinary craftsman who also understands traditional kayak design and is a highly skilled paddler to boot. In addition to very high performance his boats have the workmanship of fine furniture.


I have been looking at those now ( big green egg) , since someone posted where they made a table for one, then i seen it at a home show a few weeks ago. I also seen a Primo brand (I believe). They said they had a shock absorber on the front, just incase you dropped the lid, it wouldn't crack the egg. Is this a real problem, or are they just eggsagerating (pun intended). We are supposed to get our extra tax check soon, so a cooker like this was on my list. Right now all I have is the smallest Webber grill they make, I can cook about 5 hamburgers at a time, and I am wanting something to cook some babyback ribs.
TS-55, FS-KS angle unit, 55 inch guide rail, Domino (pin style), 3 Domino systainer assortments(one sipo set),Multi-position Guide Stop 20, Domiplate , PSB-300, FOGtainer 4, CXS set

Offline Eli

  • Posts: 2501
  • A Yankee in Kangaroo Court
    • Metafizix
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #53 on: April 18, 2008, 05:34 AM »
I've recently started replacing all my Carhartt stuff with this:
http://www.kinggee.com.au/
Australian workwear in general is fantastic, pockets in the right places and super tough. Other brands are Bisley and Hard Yakka (means hard work in Strine speak)
I also like:
http://www.blundstone.com/
The original elastic sided workboots, two other brands are John Bull, from NZ, and Redback (a type of spider) also from AU.
Also we like La Creuset cookware, have been getting a few lately.
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline Dave Rudy

  • Posts: 771
  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #54 on: April 18, 2008, 10:07 AM »
I've recently started replacing all my Carhartt stuff with this:
http://www.kinggee.com.au/
Australian workwear in general is fantastic, pockets in the right places and super tough. Other brands are Bisley and Hard Yakka (means hard work in Strine speak)
I also like:
http://www.blundstone.com/
The original elastic sided workboots, two other brands are John Bull, from NZ, and Redback (a type of spider) also from AU.
Also we like La Creuset cookware, have been getting a few lately.

NAINA, Eli, but thanks for sharing.   ;D  Or, if we could get it, the shipping and GST would be real killers!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2008, 10:08 AM by Dave Rudy »

Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1842
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #55 on: April 18, 2008, 02:30 PM »


I have been looking at those now ( big green egg) , since someone posted where they made a table for one, then i seen it at a home show a few weeks ago. I also seen a Primo brand (I believe). They said they had a shock absorber on the front, just incase you dropped the lid, it wouldn't crack the egg. Is this a real problem, or are they just eggsagerating (pun intended). We are supposed to get our extra tax check soon, so a cooker like this was on my list. Right now all I have is the smallest Webber grill they make, I can cook about 5 hamburgers at a time, and I am wanting something to cook some babyback ribs.

There are felt seals on the base and lid so impact is cushioned. I would not recommend dropping the lid from on high but I think they are probably overstating the humpty-dumpty issue.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4617
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #56 on: April 18, 2008, 02:52 PM »
Computer components.
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Wonderwino

  • Posts: 802
  • That Green Koolaid causes mutations.
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #57 on: April 18, 2008, 05:49 PM »
When I was a practicing ag-pilot, I had to work on my airplanes and after borrowing some Snap-On tools in a shop, I was hooked.  25 years and many more thousands later, I have a full compliment of Metric & SAE wrenches with a supporting host of pliers, screwdrivers, air tools & etc.

I bought my first Nikon, a Photomic F in 1971 and have several lenses for it.  When I started to get serious about digital photography a few years ago, the old non-AI lenses don't work on the digital SLRs, so I had to get a few AIs to go with my D70.  I bought a D300 "by accident" on eBay in December.  Great camera!

My wood shop is full of Jet stationary tools, Milwaukee, Bosch, Dewalt, Leigh, Porter Cable, Jorgensen, Makita and etc. collected over 35 years.  The Festools are a recent addition, having severely smoked the credit card over the last month.  I volunteered to build a bar for our local Elks Lodge, and I want to do it right.  That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

My wife tells me that when I die, she's going to have a helluvan auction!  But, she'll have my credit card bill , too!
Water separates the people of the world; wine unites them.

Offline Eli

  • Posts: 2501
  • A Yankee in Kangaroo Court
    • Metafizix
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #58 on: April 18, 2008, 07:43 PM »
I've recently started replacing all my Carhartt stuff with this:
http://www.kinggee.com.au/
Australian workwear in general is fantastic, pockets in the right places and super tough. Other brands are Bisley and Hard Yakka (means hard work in Strine speak)
I also like:
http://www.blundstone.com/
The original elastic sided workboots, two other brands are John Bull, from NZ, and Redback (a type of spider) also from AU.
Also we like La Creuset cookware, have been getting a few lately.

NAINA, Eli, but thanks for sharing.   ;D  Or, if we could get it, the shipping and GST would be real killers!

You can get Blundstones and La Creuset in the states. The Blunnies aren't even much more expensive.  ;D And the La Creuset is half the price. You're out of luck for the cargo pants though, you're right.  :-\
Do nothing, stay ahead.

Offline poto

  • Posts: 408
Re: What else do you buy?
« Reply #59 on: April 18, 2008, 10:57 PM »
Okay - this is totally nerdy, but I think you'll appreciate it. I'm an oceanographer, and we have a surprisingly limited suite of tools to study the ocean. One of our most fundamental instruments is called a CTD - stands for "Conductivity" "Temperature" and "Depth". It's an instrument - usually about the size of a telescope - that we lower into the ocean to measure salinity (conductivity of the salt water), temperature and pressure (= depth). From these profiles we can calculate vertical profiles of seawater density from the surface to the bottom. A couple of these profiles will give you the ocean currents, and a host of other important information about the physics and even the biology and chemistry of the ocean.

The CTD's I use are made by a company called Sea Bird Electronics out of Bellevue Washington. I was one of the first users of their SBE19 - a "personal" CTD - back in the mid 1980's. I was working in the Gulf of Maine between March and July on a small, seriously tippy boat. My assistant and I were doing an impressive job of returning nutrients to the ocean (i.e. barfing) while the captain was trying to keep us on station. During transits between stations, the CTD was rolling all over the deck, smashing into the bulkheads (the CTD has a glass conductivity cell), and we were too weak from seasickness to do anything about it. Regardless, the CTD gave us superb data, and is still working almost 20 years later! That's a seriously well built instrument. It can measure temperature to 1/1000th of a degree, is incredibly stable over time, and is indestructible. I won't buy anything but Sea Bird Electronics instruments for my research after that.

By the way, if you think Festools are expensive, a "cheap" CTD starts at about $10,000, and rapidly goes up from there. It's almost impossible to buy an oceanographic instrument for under $5000! Thank you, taxpayers of America!