Author Topic: photographing your work  (Read 25061 times)

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Offline es07Eric

  • Posts: 191
    • www.ericllanesphotography.com
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2014, 01:33 AM »
Eric is right my friend. Need to see a specific thing so that we can move forward.
A couple of my habits for interior:
- I shoot at the widest focal length in combination with the FX format.
- I often use flash
- I shoot RAW files for further edits
- The exposure triangle can be seen in the accompanying demonstrations

I wish you much success


 [wink]


p.s. titl shift lens is not a necessity, I would rather invest in a good flash and a tripod head with micro adjustment

Very well executed my friend!   [thumbs up]

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p.s. titl shift lens is not a necessity, I would rather invest in a good flash and a tripod head with micro adjustment
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I couldn't agree with this more!

Eric/Alkaline,

Amazing shots.  Are you two using HDR in your shots.  The details look almost surreal.

I for one do not use HDR in any of my photography; to me, it's just an unnecessary step.  I do not by any means discourage or frown upon those that do.  When I setup complex shots, I reach for plate glass filters or ND (neutral density) filters to achieve the look I want. 

Now, to answer your question:  No, this is not an HDR composition, this (and I'm speaking for my image) text book example of what lighting can and will do for an image. 

To piggyback off of Paul's comment, these are not pop-up flashes or even the external speedlights, and not to say they can't be used, to achieve the look, there is a time and place for these types of lights.  When I can, I often opt to use the absolute best light possible and that includes the sun! 

Also, when shooting flash, most tend to shoot at higher apertures as the aperture controls the flash and shutter speed controls the ambient.  The "surreal" that your experiencing is due to the stopped down apertures, and again is almost inherent in flash photography.  Another tip related to this: your lens performs at its absolute best stopped down.  Now, I will tell you that there have been times that I've been blown away with lens sharpness wide open (i.e. f/1.2, f/1.4, f1.8, f/2, and f/2.8)

To recap the setup, the bar shot has three mono-lights setup with modifiers. 

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that Alkaline's images are also using artificial light (flash/strobe).  I'm simply going off of the natural light coming in through the windows in the last two shots:

- in the bedroom, the ambient exterior light is at least 1/3 underexposed relative to the interior
- in the dining room/sitting room shot, he balanced the exterior ambient with the interior exposure

Now, I will say there is a lot more effort that he as put in to these exposures, but these are the two things that stand out to me when I look at photographs.  He did an absolutely amazing job with all three images!  (and Alkaline, I hope you don't take offense at my attempt to dissect your photographs!  [embarassed])

So, if you would like to try an experiment, try taking a picture in a room that has a window sans flash, say your kitchen or living room and shoot into or towards the window, and you will see exactly what I mean!

Also, while a FX/FF or full frame camera would be my weapon of choice, I know that it may not be in the budget for some.  The industry has made amazing advances in wide angle lenses for DX or crop bodies, so take a minute to consider that as well; say the Canon 10-22mm.

I hope this helps and that I haven't added additional complication.  Flash photography is not for the faint of heart.

There have been two very distinct milestones in my photography: 
1.  when I went FX/Full frame
2. when I learned and understood flash photography

Remember that lighting will make or break a photograph...
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Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1914
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2014, 08:33 AM »
I would argue that even flash isn't necesary for decent images, but additional lighting still is needed usually. Back in the day I did some stuff using hot lamps (aka 200w or higher incandescent lamps..that got really hot!). Todays LED technology has changed all that with many very nice products for video production that could be put to use in still photography. Here's but one example and there are many more http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B008X7KI2M/ref=redir_mdp_mobile?keywords=600%20led%20video%20light&qid=1364881776&ref_=sr_1_2&sr=8-2

Flash is more capable at competing with the sun since flash isn't (usually) impacted by shutter speed but flood lamps can be easier to visualize with. I know better flash heads have modeling lamps that help visualize but when balancing between flash and ambient the modeling lamps are way too dim and you must rely on test images to assess (or a lot of experience with an ambient/flash light meter). All that being said I still prefer flash since I long ago got over the learning curve but good images can be achieved without it.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2014, 08:43 AM by Paul G »
+1

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1914
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2014, 10:47 AM »
Eric/Alkaline,

Amazing shots.  Are you two using HDR in your shots.  The details look almost surreal.

To piggyback on Erics comments about HDR, it's useful to understand what it is and why a properly lit photograph might resemble HDR.

HDR or High Dynamic Range is a software processing of an image to enhance the perceived dynamic range of an image. That begs the question what is Dynamic Range (DR)? Well it is the overall range of tones from black to white that a given imaging medium (slide film, negative film, photo print, laser or inkjet, digital sensor, iphone screen, etc.) is able to capture or display. Typically the capture mediums have a higher DR than the display mediums. In a practical sense it is often described as the amount of detail that can be seen in the deep shadows and bright highlights. Back in the film days, generally speaking negative film had the greatest DR, next was slide film and far behind was the photo printing paper. You may have experienced this when a print came back from a lab and all the highlight detail was gone and it was all white. The info was on the negative but the paper was unable to render it. It would go back to the lab to be exposed differently to retain that highlight detail only to find that the shadow detail was now all black. Some folks like Ansel Adams would overcome this with elaborate dodge and burn schemes in the darkroom, dodging or blocking the light in certain places from getting to the photo paper and burning or enhancing the light in other areas using a sheet of cardboard with a hole in it. Along came computers and photoshop and some folks started experimenting with combining 'dark' and 'light' scans of the same film to bring together both the shadow and highlight detail into one printable file. Eventually came digital cameras and todays sensors have a very high DR (higher than the display screens we use to view the images with) and the HDR software in the camera will quickly do the same trick that early photoshop folks were doing in hours or days.

Well if a scene is properly illuminated in the first place such that it is already in the dynamic range of the computer screen or output paper then HDR becomes less useful. Careful lighting already balances the shadow and highlight levels retaining the details there within the display mediums ability to render it. Technically there will always be some deep shadows and highlights in the scene beyond the ability to render but if they are a very small and insignificant part of the overall image then they don't distract the viewer.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2014, 11:01 AM by Paul G »
+1

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2014, 07:34 PM »
Thought I'd chime in here.  I prefer natural light in my photography.

For on site work (like a kitchen, etc.) I find natural lighting is key.

To the OP's question, I've found that HDR photography is the "bees knees".  Simply set your camera on a tripod and set your exposure bracketing in +/- 1 intervals (if unfamiliar, Google "exposure bracketing").  What this does is it shoots (depending on what sensitivity you set up), an image that is under exposed one stop (the -1), and image that is exposed just right (+0), and an image that is over exposed (+1), (some cameras have more brackets available), all with one click of the shutter (i prefer a remote for this).

In a large area, it is next to impossible to optimize exposure for shadows, sunlight coming through window, etc.  This is where HDR comes in to take the best exposure from 3 versions of the same photo to make the best image possible.

There is some pretty good cheap and free HDR software that combines the 3 images and optimizes the three together.  (usually if you shoot where there is sun outside, your "typical" exposure will make the outside wash out, or accentuate shadows.  Combining the three HDR photos with software takes out highlights and dark shadows at the same time.  Usually you can tweak to your taste, but I've found success with the auto adjust settings.

Also for what it's worth, a higher aperture setting is ideal to show off all detail (like f5.6+), so most lenses can do a decent job. (even when I shoot with my  f1.2 lens, I tend to stop it down quite a lot for detail shots).

my two cents.

Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline alkaline

  • Posts: 376
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2016, 01:25 PM »
photo shoot using the ambient light...


 [wink]
I have several boxes Festool, one MTF, four guide rails and big taste to play. )))

Offline alkaline

  • Posts: 376
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2016, 01:25 PM »
...and flash.

 [wink]
I have several boxes Festool, one MTF, four guide rails and big taste to play. )))

Offline Miamont123

  • Posts: 1
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #36 on: June 22, 2017, 01:19 PM »
My problem is almost similar, I would like to learn to take good pictures with my professional Panasonic Lumix ... [blink] :'(