Author Topic: photographing your work  (Read 18824 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3290
photographing your work
« on: September 28, 2014, 11:47 AM »
hi there

has any one got any tips or tricks for photographing your site work.
im talking more kitchens , floors, built ins

im looking to take some good shots for websites, flyers et. I have a Nikon 5200 camera  but cant get the pic the way I want it.
they usually have too much light in areas and shadows etc in others


thanks alan
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline jonny round boy

  • Posts: 3224
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2014, 11:57 AM »
I have the same problem. I can turn out good work, I just can't get pictures of it that don't make it look crap!
Festoolian since February 2006

TS55R EBQ saw - CTL26 - CTL Mini - OF1400EBQ router - KS120 Kapex SCMS - ETS150/3 sander - RO90 sander - DF500 Domino - PDC18/4 drill - PSC420 jigsaw - OFK500 trimmer

Wish list (in no particular order!): Anything not listed above....

Offline Peter Parfitt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 3536
    • New Brit Workshop on YouTube
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2014, 12:14 PM »
I am sure that there are many FOGgers who have huge credentials in the photography area but...

You need a wider angle lens for whole room shots and try and get a good depth of field so that everything looks sharp and is in focus.

Lighting is important and I now have a pro flash from Nikon which can be mounted on the camera or placed anywhere in the same room to create the right lighting effect.

I have stood outside and photographed through an open window to get more of the room in the shot.

I use Photoshop to sort out my mistakes and to change the shooting parameters after the event.

Remember the 1/3rd rule for key shots.

Peter

Offline teocaf

  • Posts: 597
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2014, 01:25 PM »
on site photography is a huge topic with lots of complications.  that's why the photogs that specialize in that can charge good coin to get you pro looking shots.  different site (architectural) photographers will also differ in style from one to another.  but this type of photography is a skill just like woodworking and you can develop it to the extent of the work and interest you put into it.  some tips that are by no means exhaustive:
-tripod (always)
-bracket shots (learn aperture priority mode or manual mode from your manual or other how-to books and shoot a series of shots at different exposures (shutter speeds), keeping everything else the same.  this will let you get good exposures for light areas on one, shadow area on another etc.  you can then pick a good compromise or blend images in a basic photo program like adobe elements, iPhoto, etc.
-for areas that are not really large you can use just one flash on your camera that will trigger small inexpensive slave units that you place in the darker areas.  these will fire when their sensor "sees" the main flash go off. ( i use morris mini slave wide)
-large reflectors like a drywall panel or a piece of plywood painted white can work wonders to reflect sunlight or lamp light into the darker areas
-if you do a lot of this kind of photography, really consider getting a pc (perspective control) lens.  this will help you line up the verticals in your photo like you see in the architecture pro shots.  otherwise you get all the associated distortions that you see in the amateur stuff.

if you find it a fun hobby then you can have an ongoing interest in this and keep developing your skills.  if it feels like pulling teeth, then just find a local photo buff or student that shoots these type of shots well and who is building their portfolio and negotiate a price or barter with them.

even if you keep expenses to a minimum, photography is a runaway cost just like woodworking etc.  by the time you get all the bits and pieces and invest the time in learning a program etc...--that's time away from your main business that earns your living.  the best thing is to hire a pro and work the price into your business.  they go in, do the job right the first time, put it on your website right away and go on to the next thing.  a pro shot speaks volumes that reflects well on your work.

Offline jonny round boy

  • Posts: 3224
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2014, 01:26 PM »

Remember the 1/3rd rule for key shots.


And that is....?
Festoolian since February 2006

TS55R EBQ saw - CTL26 - CTL Mini - OF1400EBQ router - KS120 Kapex SCMS - ETS150/3 sander - RO90 sander - DF500 Domino - PDC18/4 drill - PSC420 jigsaw - OFK500 trimmer

Wish list (in no particular order!): Anything not listed above....

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3438
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2014, 01:28 PM »
has any one got any tips or tricks for photographing your site work.

I will try...

im talking more kitchens , floors, built ins
Kitchens are difficult because of multiple light sources and tight working space, built-ins easier. Floors by them selves don't really make very interesting photos even when correctly exposed. For me, natural light makes them look the best.
Practice on built-ins and then up your game.
Read photography for realestate, for more information on lighting and photographing your work.
Subscribe to some good real estate photographers blogs, they often publish tips and tricks.

im looking to take some good shots for websites, flyers et. I have a Nikon 5200 camera  but cant get the pic the way I want it.
If you can post or attach a couple photo's I could pick one or two and then post what I do to correct them.

The camera doesn't matter, but good glass (lens) and composition (where and how you frame the photo) do. A good fast wide angle (18-55) zoom lens and a good fast telephoto/macro lens (100 mm) are good one-two punch to give your photos drama. The wide angle lens will enable you to take pictures in tight spaces, create more drama and the macro will allow you to take some nice close ups for contrast. The wide angle will distort the verticals in the photos so you need to correct that. If you have more space and can use a longer lens, then the correction will be less.

they usually have too much light in areas and shadows etc in others

Shoot earlier or later in the day for less contrast (glare and shadow) and use a tripod to shoot at a slower speed to compensate for less light. Shoot "RAW" mode to fix bad exposure (under/over) in Photoshop or similar software, and use software Photoshop etc. to correct lens distortion correcting verticals.
Tim

Offline Peter Parfitt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 3536
    • New Brit Workshop on YouTube
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2014, 01:41 PM »

Remember the 1/3rd rule for key shots.


And that is....?

When you compose a shot it works better if there is some interesting feature at about 1/3 in from the left or right edge and 1/3 in from the top or bottom.

Peter

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3290
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2014, 01:55 PM »
thanks for the advice .

I don't really have any pics . I only just started . I deleted a few  pics a few days ago that I wasn't happy with.
im only learning photography. previously it was just point and shoot with a cheap 2 mega pixle .


im going to go self employed soon and want to get a few pics before that happens

I tiled a kitchen on Friday (grouted Saturday). im going back tomorrow evening or Tuesday evening anyway so I might take a few pics

the main problem im getting is that the lights are  led down lighters on the ceiling. they are creating a lot of shadows under the upper cabinets.
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3438
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2014, 01:57 PM »
the best thing is to hire a pro and work the price into your business.  they go in, do the job right the first time, put it on your website right away and go on to the next thing.  a pro shot speaks volumes that reflects well on your work.

Good advice, I agree.
I like the challenge of shooting my own and it helps improve my work when I can see and study the errors through a lens or on the computer screen.
Tim

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3438
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2014, 02:00 PM »
the main problem im getting is that the lights are  led down lighters on the ceiling. they are creating a lot of shadows under the upper cabinets.

Turn them off or turn them down (dimmer) and use natural light with a longer exposure on your camera. If no natural light you will have to light with either a flash, reflector or led out of frame aimed under the cabinet. If you can shoot without showing the top of the counter you could try to put some reflective material (card or tin foil) on the counter to reflect under the upper cabinets.
Experiment, it can be fun to see what you get.
Tim
« Last Edit: September 28, 2014, 02:04 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline sakurama

  • Posts: 76
    • My real work
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2014, 05:41 PM »
If you're not a pro the less lights you use the better off you are going to be. Think of how much trouble you'd get into with a ton of tools that you have no idea what to do with. Keep it simple.

As was mentioned use a tripod. Wide angles are imperative but you don't need to worry about distortion unless you tilt them up or down. Use the tripod to set your height and keep the camera level and the lens won't distort anything. It's not a bad thing if it does for things like a detail but for the overall shot of the room it's distracting.

The problem with very dark and very light areas is solved not by lights but for waiting for the time of day when those lights are in balance with each other. Typically that's dusk or dawn. If you still have trouble with certain lights that can't be dimmed turn them off and try another longer exposure without them. You have the advantage of a digital camera that has a screen to show you what your last shot looks like - use it. Make changes. If you have a strobe/flash just point it into the ceiling or into a big wall behind you. Anything really that will diffuse the light.

You've gotten good advice here so just experiment.

If you want I wrote a photo primer once for a thread I did on a trip: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=491784&page=7 and while it's primarily written to the audience of that board the advice is general and what I would give in my presentations to younger photographers at school or such.

Good luck.

Gregor
new york • portland • www.gregorhalenda.com

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3290
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2014, 06:15 PM »
thanks for the advice gregor and tim

 I will take a few shots and see what you think.


"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline gkaiseril

  • Posts: 329
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2014, 08:35 PM »
You should look at the Nikon CLS lighting system. The camera can support Nikon's CLS lighting system. In the manual flash mode and using the Nikon CLS flash units in the manual mode you can fine tune remote triggered SpeedLights to fill the darker areas. You will need to close doors or drapes to block any bright outside light.

The Nikon ClS flash system used optical sensors so the lights will need to be in line of sight or you may an extension cord with a sensor.
George Kaiser

TS 55 REQ, RO 90, RO 150, CT 26, PSB 420, MFT/3

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 834
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2014, 09:36 PM »
I'll second Gregor's suggestions (not just because he is a pro photographer).  When you're just starting to learn, I would not recommend messing with remote strobes or flashes yet. Work on your composition, balancing light in the room (close the shades if it's too bright outside and the sunlight is creating too much contrast in the scene) and understanding how you can manipulate exposure time, aperture and ISO to get the image you're after.  If you really need a flash, do as he suggests and point the flash at the ceiling (assuming it's white). The ceiling is a giant reflector, use it.  If you need to throw a little light forward to lighten shadows from your overhead reflector, take a piece of paper and rubber band it around the back of the flash head (still pointed at the ceiling) so that 6" sticks out over the flash head.  That will reflect a little light forward. 
-Raj

Offline Thunderchyld

  • Posts: 93
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2014, 09:16 AM »
If you want to even out the lighting without having to carry much, there are drawstring bags made from the same light-diffusing fabric used to make the light hoods.  You just clip the bag around the bulb and it really does seem to help eliminate hot spots.  It would work on either the homeowners lights or your work lights.

Offline gkaiseril

  • Posts: 329
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2014, 11:44 AM »
You also might be able to just use the Nikon CLS system in the automatic mode and let the camera and flashes automatically set the power levels. Nikon offers many levels of CLS flash units. The SB-700 is the least powerful and least flexible (limited to 2 units)  and then there is the more powerful SB-900 and SB-910 which can be setup with 3 remote units in automatic but for Real Estate photography you might want 4 SB-910's. One on the camera to act as the master control unit and then up to 3 remotes places as needed.

It might even be possible to use work lights to fill-in dark areas.



George Kaiser

TS 55 REQ, RO 90, RO 150, CT 26, PSB 420, MFT/3

Offline Reiska

  • Posts: 1153
  • Hackers build things, Crackers break them.
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2014, 03:18 PM »
Depending how serious you are about getting professional looking pictures of rooms you might want to look at Tilt-Shift lenses or software approaches to correct geometry of a normal lens like DxO Viewpoint.

These will not fix the lighting issues you mentioned, but correct the room geometry to look natural.
The sky's the limit in my workshop, literally. [big grin]

Offline irishroey

  • Posts: 58
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2014, 04:35 PM »
Very interested in this thread myself, I have a website going live soon and the pictures I have are the only thing I am not happy with at the moment


Offline es07Eric

  • Posts: 190
    • www.ericllanesphotography.com
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2014, 11:24 PM »
There is a lot of good information here… and that may be problematic for someone (<- general statement) that is seeking advice.

If I may add my .02 I would recommend that any individual that is looking for critique share one photo and we can all provide CONSTRUCTIVE criticism.

I can provide a ton of information, but I need to know where you need help, as they say, "a picture is worth a thousand words"…

Cheers,
Eric

Here's one I did for an interior designer… still waiting for this to hit the shelves.
KS 120 | TS 75 EQ | PS 420 EBQ | OS 400 EQ | OF 1400 EQ | MFK 700 EQ | HL 850 E | DF 500 Q | RO 150 FEQ | RO 90 DX FEQ | ETS 150/3 EQ | ETS 125 EQ | PDC 18/4 | CXS | CT 26 E | CT MIDI | CT SYS | Boom Arm | MFH-1000 | WCR 1000 | MFT/3 | CMS-VL | FS 3000 | FS 1900 | FS 1400 | FS 1400 LR 32 | FS 1080 | LR 32 | SurFix |

Offline teocaf

  • Posts: 597
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2014, 11:40 PM »
Eric, in the spirit of constructive criticism, this photo of yours would be a prime candidate for the PC (perspective control) or as someone else called it (tilt shift) lens.  it would help align the columns vertically instead of showing them "falling over".  you might be able to get the same thing with setting the camera level with the midway point between floor and ceiling.
the lighting though, looks great and nicely balanced, which i imagined took some work to do.
compositionally, it might make it more interesting if all the chairs were not lined up--perhaps the one second to last on the right was at an angle as if someone had just left sitting there.  that's of course up to personal taste, and the client's desires of course.  but i would have suggested it to give them an option for a little bit more dynamic look.
I would have also preferred a higher angle to see the bar top but then of course you're dealing with shooting straight on into a mirror so that presents its own problems.  one possible solution would be for the client to place a prop or something non-reflective at the base of the mirror--something interesting that looks like it would belong there.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2014, 11:46 PM by teocaf »

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1871
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2014, 12:07 AM »
There is a lot of good information here… and that may be problematic for someone (<- general statement) that is seeking advice.

If I may add my .02 I would recommend that any individual that is looking for critique share one photo and we can all provide CONSTRUCTIVE criticism.

I can provide a ton of information, but I need to know where you need help, as they say, "a picture is worth a thousand words"…

Cheers,
Eric

Here's one I did for an interior designer… still waiting for this to hit the shelves.
(Attachment Link)

Eric, I like that photo. The low camera height makes the bar feel substantial and the exagerated perspective resulting from the low height ads some drama. Shift lenses are great for keeping parallel objects parallel especially when things are off a little, but here it's not as important.
+1

Offline es07Eric

  • Posts: 190
    • www.ericllanesphotography.com
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #22 on: October 07, 2014, 12:08 AM »
Yes, I also captured this using a 17mm TSE however, it was simply, for the lack of better terms flat and almost sterile and looked amateur (which to me is counterintuitive [huh] as it takes 5 minutes just to align a tilt shift lens). 

This whole room however, was captured using the 17mm TSE as the difference in depths created an almost random distribution of column angles (I hope that conveys and is understandable) as the columns furthest away had a different angle than the columns closer to me.

The lighting was three Elinchrom strobes.  If you look really closely, and pay attention to the shadows, their location will reveal themselves  [tongue]  The bar was flanked using two Rotalux gridded soft boxes and the fill was dead center behind me using a hooded octal box. 

I do agree with you on the chairs, and you're right it is a matter of personal taste.  I do enjoy capturing an engaging image and a chair, just as you've described it would create visual tension in a positive way!

As for the mirror, It was not shot straight on for two reasons,

one, well, it's a mirror and my ugly mug would be smack dab right in the middle of it, i know that it could have been taken out in post but shooting this angle with a wide angle lens created the "engagement" that I lacked in the rest of the composition.

two, there's a TV behind the mirror, it's one of those fancy Seura displays with a LCD behind a mirror.  There is another shot that shows the TV live!

I know it's hard to take one shot out of context as the more you have the better the story.  I do however believe in creating a strong composition in which a single photo can stand on its own out of context and series.

I appreciate the reply and input!  Now let's help you guys with your pictures so you can make money on the areas in which you are truly masters!

Cheers,
Eric
KS 120 | TS 75 EQ | PS 420 EBQ | OS 400 EQ | OF 1400 EQ | MFK 700 EQ | HL 850 E | DF 500 Q | RO 150 FEQ | RO 90 DX FEQ | ETS 150/3 EQ | ETS 125 EQ | PDC 18/4 | CXS | CT 26 E | CT MIDI | CT SYS | Boom Arm | MFH-1000 | WCR 1000 | MFT/3 | CMS-VL | FS 3000 | FS 1900 | FS 1400 | FS 1400 LR 32 | FS 1080 | LR 32 | SurFix |

Offline es07Eric

  • Posts: 190
    • www.ericllanesphotography.com
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #23 on: October 07, 2014, 12:11 AM »
There is a lot of good information here… and that may be problematic for someone (<- general statement) that is seeking advice.

If I may add my .02 I would recommend that any individual that is looking for critique share one photo and we can all provide CONSTRUCTIVE criticism.

I can provide a ton of information, but I need to know where you need help, as they say, "a picture is worth a thousand words"…

Cheers,
Eric

Here's one I did for an interior designer… still waiting for this to hit the shelves.
(Attachment Link)

Eric, I like that photo. The low camera height makes the bar feel substantial and the exagerated perspective resulting from the low height ads some drama. Shift lenses are great for keeping parallel objects parallel especially when things are off a little, but here it's not as important.

As I was typing, i got a warning that someone had posted!  If you read my reply, it's pretty much backs up your reply here!   [thanks]  But I like your description better than mine!

Thanks so much!
KS 120 | TS 75 EQ | PS 420 EBQ | OS 400 EQ | OF 1400 EQ | MFK 700 EQ | HL 850 E | DF 500 Q | RO 150 FEQ | RO 90 DX FEQ | ETS 150/3 EQ | ETS 125 EQ | PDC 18/4 | CXS | CT 26 E | CT MIDI | CT SYS | Boom Arm | MFH-1000 | WCR 1000 | MFT/3 | CMS-VL | FS 3000 | FS 1900 | FS 1400 | FS 1400 LR 32 | FS 1080 | LR 32 | SurFix |

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1871
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #24 on: October 07, 2014, 12:27 AM »
You're welcome. I completely understand your point about the 'corrected' shift image looking flat. Great for documenting an object or space but can hamper the sizzle at times.
+1

Offline alkaline

  • Posts: 358
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #25 on: October 07, 2014, 12:41 AM »
Eric is right my friend. Need to see a specific thing so that we can move forward.
A couple of my habits for interior:
- I shoot at the widest focal length in combination with the FX format.
- I often use flash
- I shoot RAW files for further edits
- The exposure triangle can be seen in the accompanying demonstrations

I wish you much success


 [wink]


p.s. titl shift lens is not a necessity, I would rather invest in a good flash and a tripod head with micro adjustment
I have several boxes Festool, one MTF, four guide rails and big taste to play. )))

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1871
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2014, 07:44 AM »
p.s. titl shift lens is not a necessity, I would rather invest in a good flash and a tripod head with micro adjustment

Regarding tripod heads, Manfrotto 410 or 405 are hard to beat for architectural photography.

As for lighting, oh my is that a deep yet utterly necessary tangent for architectural photography. Flash is an intimidating thing for photo noobs. We're not talking that little pop-up thingy on an entry level SLR. Flashes need to be off camera, often using multiple heads, often with diffusion devices attached and using stands. Also have to address the issues of color temperature and intensity of the ambient light (if any), be it a window (and the time of day and cloud cover) or the artificial lighting (be it incandescent, fluorescent or LED) and worse yet is a combination of them all. There you will be adjusting the ambient light using your shutter speed relative to your flash output to get the desired intensity balance.   And balancing the color temps takes using color shifting gels on the light sources or doing each light source as a separate image and recombine in photoshop. The good news in all this complexity is how MUCH easier it is to get a handle on it using digital vs film.

As far as cameras go, if you want great images you'll need to go beyond your cell phone or entry level cameras. Those can be useful in a pinch but don't come close to offering the features and accessories you may find helpful down the road. Look for 'full frame' SLRs. What that means is the digital sensor is the same size as 35mm film image area. And for lenses you want those that are designed for that sensor size. Here's an explanation from Nikon regarding their DX vs FX product lines: http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Learn-And-Explore/Article/g588ouey/the-dx-and-fx-formats.html  I haven't kept up with all the brands and models but Canon and Nikon were long dueling for supremacy in this area. One thing Canon has an edge on is their 17mm tilt shift lens, IIRC Nikons widest tilt shift is 24mm. But both are extremely capable brands and once you're invested in lenses you tend to stay with the same brand (I happen to have Nikon). There's also larger format products like Haselblad and view cameras but no need to go there IMO for the DIY architectural or product photographer.

You'll want to understand the relationship between f-stop and depth of field. F-stop is the varying size of the lens aperture, with the larger number corresponding to the smaller aperture size. Depth of field is what impacts the focus of near and far objects in an image. The smaller the aperture the greater depth of field. But also the smaller aperture restricts your light which matters if you want a human in the shot who can't sit perfectly still for a 30 sec exposure using the dim indoor ambient light. It's tempting to just increase the 'film' speed but that tends to degrade the image quality. Flash might be the rescue in such situations.

I have some books that are now out of print, but here are a few newer ones that might seriously help a newcomer to the disciplines of architectural photography. I haven't read these but per the descriptions and reviews seem to address many of the fundamental issues:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1933952881/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1412676474&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1608953009/ref=pd_aw_sims_1?pi=SL500_SY115&simLd=1

One thing to keep in mind when starting out is that the human eye and brain are amazing at processing images and technology is trying to catch up. For example when you look at a room in person your head and eye is changing position and every time you do your eye adjusts its focus and iris (f-stop) and your brain combines all these varying details into one 'image'. It also is adjusting the color temperature in the various inputs and combines the blue window light with the yellow incandescent light and you perceive it all as the same when it isn't.  So your job when taking a picture is to overcome all the limitations of the technology to capture the image as your far superior eyes and brain see it. Do this long enough and your eye and brain will be able to dumb down to the level of the camera which especially helps you see how to adjust the lighting.

Lastly I haven't even touched on composition. That's the largely personal preference aspect but all the fundamentals of camera settings and lighting apply to all of it. Enjoy the journey
« Last Edit: October 07, 2014, 09:31 AM by Paul G »
+1

Offline BAO

  • Posts: 1
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2014, 09:46 AM »
Eric/Alkaline,

Amazing shots.  Are you two using HDR in your shots.  The details look almost surreal.

Offline fdengel

  • Posts: 850
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2014, 11:27 AM »
Looking at the two columns, I was actually taking that to be lens distortion.

The perspective is interesting and makes a great picture, but I think I would have tried to straighten those out a bit - it looks "wrong" to me with them tilted in that much... shouldn't take too much of a tweak though to deal with that...

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1871
Re: photographing your work
« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2014, 02:59 PM »
BTW, if anyone is unsure of what a tilt shift lens does for you just ask
+1