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51
Festool Tools & Accessories / Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Last post by DeformedTree on Yesterday at 10:20 PM »
Here we can get 3-phase 230V (so 400V between phases). Normal connection is either single phase 35/40A or three-phase 25A. If you want 3x35A or 1x50A, your fixed network cost go up by about $800 on a yearly basis. Yeah, beyond the fusebox basically nothing is bigger than 2.5mm2 here.

AC is near-nonexistent, heating is all gas-based or district heating.

Curious what country you are in.  I'm aware in some countries they have what you mention of 3Phase into houses, and then you just grab legs as needed.

Not running much on 40As.  My water heater alone pulls well over 100A, it's actually wired with 3 circuits of 40A @220V .  Basically because it's designed to run in countries with 3P options as you mentioned.   My current house was built in an area/time when they gave them 80A or 100A services because of Gas service.  That was quick to be fixed.  I grew up in rural areas, so 200A services were the norm from the 50s when they put the power in.  You either heated with wood or electric.   I'd love to have a 400A service but it just wasn't in the cards.  Today US building code doesn't allow anything less than 100A/220V service to a home, I personally wish they would change it to 200A min, since builders cheap out and put 150A panels in, saving all of 5 to 10 USDs, but really limit the homeowners.

You can get 3P in the US, it's just hard, since it's really commercial only. So unless you just happen to have a 3P transmission passing along your property going to someplace you are out of luck or will spend many mountains of money to have run to where you are if they will even consider it.  Even a lot of commercial businesses can't get 3P since it's just not run everywhere.  Nearest connection for me would be 1/2mile straight line, but would take far more to run the lines too me, and I'm not even sure the particular feed is even active.

With your limitations, Festool might need to make gas powered track saws and routers.
52
General Friendly Chat / Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Last post by Dane on Yesterday at 10:17 PM »
We’ve been using the Technivorm for a decade.  Thermal carafe is the way to go in my opinion.  The thing I really like about the Technivorm, aside from the great coffee, is that it’s built to be repairable.  I’ve never had anything crap on me with it, but I appreciate knowing that it’s servicable.  So tired of buying throw away Chinese crap...You can get them pretty cheap on EBay and Mercari.
53
Building Materials / Re: Dominofix plate material?
« Last post by Svar on Yesterday at 10:00 PM »
Ya I’d have to side with Svar on this one. Aluminum privacy panels used in bathrooms are a lot cheaper than the equivalent panel in phenolic.
Just to be clear. I have encountered phenolic partitions and locker doors in public spaces, but I think it is of lower strength/quality than router plate stuff.
54
General Friendly Chat / Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Last post by kevinculle on Yesterday at 09:51 PM »
Hamilton Beach 49980A, makes a 12 cup pot or a 16 oz mug, only $60 at amazon.  The downside is it's only $60 at amazon so your friends may not be as impressed but they'll like the coffee just fine.
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I did this about 8 years ago in our raised ranch.  It all depends how your rise and consistency of rise fits into the local codes.  With doing tile on the half way landing and hardwood on the first and second floors things got interesting.  The upper stairway was factory built and with the changes in elevation of the landing and top floor I was able to add treads with 1/4" ply to face the risers after cutting off the original tread noses.

I ended up just building the lower staircase to get all the rises into code.  In hind site, I should have done that with the upper staircase too.  The factory built stair case actually didn't meet code due to the maximum variation, so I had to adjust the height of one thread so everything would be in spec.  I couldn't believe a factory built stair would have that variation, but the inspector said he had seen that in the houses built in our house timeframe.
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Festool Tools & Accessories / Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Last post by Coen on Yesterday at 09:38 PM »

There really is no push for it, and in general very few people care. It's not like the inch/metric situation where it has a major impact on folks every day, commerce issues, general headaches in doing things.  The power grid situation is really a small impact all around as things that should be on 220 all ready are (HVAC, dryers, welders, ovens, cooktops, water heaters, EV car charging).  It's the general purpose appliances that aren't, and there just isn't a compelling reason to change.  It's not like those items are pulling massive amounts of amps where going 220 would make a big difference.


EV charging on 220V... how thick are you going to run that wire or how long are you willing to wait?

I mentioned EV car chargers.  Those are 220V.  Most run a NEMA 14-50 or 14-60 Plug.  Same plug used on welders and dryers and other items.  Some places now mandate garages have one of these plugs in the garage on new construction/remodels so it's there.

It's not that we don't have 220V, houses use it extensively, just not on general branch circuits (stuff we randomly plug into).

If you were thinking 220V isn't enough to charge a car, it's fine.  While not in use right now, the 220V AC based chargers can go up to 100Amps,  so 22kw,  which means a 90kwh Tesla can full charge on that in just over 4 hours, which is far less time than most folks sleep.   I don't think any country is running more than 240V into homes, so the US doesn't have an issue there.  And also you just get bigger amperage services.  I took mine from the lame 100A, to 200A normal service, but plenty of houses have 400A services (just 2 200A panels).  Wire is a none issue for one plug in a garage.   I don't see anyone installing DC fast chargers in their garage (unless maybe they have a battery bank as part of their house), since their is no reason for fast charging at homes, that's for long distance travel, and thats where you stop at "charge stations" along the way where they can charge a car in 30 mins or less.

Here we can get 3-phase 230V (so 400V between phases). Normal connection is either single phase 35/40A or three-phase 25A. If you want 3x35A or 1x50A, your fixed network cost go up by about $800 on a yearly basis. Yeah, beyond the fusebox basically nothing is bigger than 2.5mm2 here.

AC is near-nonexistent, heating is all gas-based or district heating.
57
General Friendly Chat / Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Last post by JSlovic on Yesterday at 09:35 PM »
Another Technivorm vote
We've got the thermal carafe model and preheating the carafe with boiling water keeps it hot for quite awhile
58
Building Materials / Re: Dominofix plate material?
« Last post by Cheese on Yesterday at 09:34 PM »
Ya I’d have to side with Svar on this one. Aluminum privacy panels used in bathrooms are a lot cheaper than the equivalent panel in phenolic.
59
Festool How To... / Planing a large modern table down.
« Last post by Macmann on Yesterday at 09:33 PM »
I’m building a dining room table.  Using 6 pieces of 4x8 to get the size I need. Would the festool planet work fine or a manual long planet recommended?
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General Friendly Chat / Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Last post by SouthRider on Yesterday at 09:33 PM »
X3 on the Technivorm Moccamaster. We bought one from Seattle Coffee Gear 6 or 7 years ago. It's a fantastic machine. Don't remember the number, but got a fairly basic model with glass carafe. While researching - we didn't need the extra features of the others.

What we learned was that the secret to good coffee is a machine that gets HOT, and this one does.

We highly reccomend it.
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