Recent Posts

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I have an awkward storage space under my stairs. Working on a french cleat wall to store stuff under there.

Got the wall complete - but my boom arm fell over and took my TS 55 with it. :( It's with Festool for repairs. More progress when I get it back!

Matt

82
Various Woodworking & Crafts Topics / Re: CA glue vs wood glue
« Last post by Peter Halle on Yesterday at 07:30 PM »
Thank you for the info @Cheese .  This constant change of hands explained my searching difficulty.  Sad to see that a complete kit in a plastic case seems to not be available anymore/

Rats.

peter
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Am I the only one tempted to slap that prepaid shipping label onto the heaviest thing I don't want anymore?  ;D

This made me smile!
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Festool How To... / Re: Adding a solid wood edge to plywood
« Last post by lwoirhaye on Yesterday at 07:07 PM »
Lacking a planer and a table saw, milling the strips may be awkward.   Registration using a shaped profile isn't needed but some special effects can be achieved by using profiled bits.  Whether it's worth the hassle to you or not is another matter.  One slip when routing the profile into the plywood edge and you have to start over.   I had the Burgess Edge set for awhile.  It worked and the edges looked alright, but it was time consuming and nerve wracking to use.

Coils of 3mm and thicker solid wood can be purchased.  They're really made for edgebanding machines but considering the hassle of making your own edging without a planer you might consider it.
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I’d expect that with the amount of debris that Don introduced into the cyclone and with the frequency that he kept introducing the debris that the cyclone would become overloaded. That would lead to a higher level of debris in the bag which was not the case.

Depends on the material you want to separate. Wood => resin => sticky... sawdust that sat in a container for a while might have clumped more or less (depending on the wood type) - then a cyclone based separator will have a way easier life as the heavier the particles, the better the separation.
Thus putting the nozzle inside a pile of settled dust quite possibly is different to having a tool generate it fresh.
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Other Tools & Accessories / Re: Carter guides for Hammer band saw...
« Last post by Dick Mahany on Yesterday at 05:57 PM »
I think a lot of it is my lack of bandsaw skills, this is my first bandsaw. The euro guides it has right now have this "wobble", so it's hard for me to tell how close they are to the blade when I set them, so I guess I tend to err on the side of caution and leave them more open than I should.

I'm using a 3/4 timberwolf blade, I was re-sawing a 6inch wide board of walnut, pretty long board. the first few feet went fine, but then I must've done something wrong, because the blade moved closer to the fence and left a dip in the cut. Maybe I pushed too hard, or the guides weren't close enough to the blade?

I realize this reply doesn't address the Carter guides however......By dip in the cut, are you referring to a barrel shaped curve within the cut?  If so that can be caused by a blade that is becoming dull or more likely not tensioned enough.  Under severe cases this can actually cause the blade to blow out through the side of the piece being re-sawed even though that bow may be totally out of sight while cutting. 

I have used Timber Wolf blades and while they have been good, some have dulled quickly.  A carbide toothed blade although pricey, can be a worthwhile expenditure if you intend to do much re-sawing.  Highland woodworking also have a non-carbide "Woodslicer" blade specifically for re-sawing that has performed pretty well in my experience.

The paper shim method as described earlier does typically work well although some guides are actually meant to be in light contact with the blade.  There should be good information available on guide setup for your actual guides, but I think it may not be guide set up that is causing this.

Also, if using a fixed fence, drift angle may be coming into play.  That can easily occur if the blade is not positioned correctly on the wheels.  Although there are lots of different views on drift and whether or not it can be adjusted, some folks use a fence with a pivot directly across from the blade teeth and steer the board through.  Others use fences that are adjustable to compensate for drift.  None of those will compensate for a blade that is dulling or not tensioned enough.  It will be interesting to see what you ultimately find out on this one. 
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It's a normal prepaid debit card. If it could only be used on Festool tools, we'd have made it green and called it the SYScard or something.

Great... Now you've totally made me want a SYScard.

Well there is this .........................  How about a Swiss Sys Card !  [big grin]

                



Seth
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Festool Tools & Accessories / Re: Track Saw Suggestions
« Last post by Birdhunter on Yesterday at 05:47 PM »
Table saws do best with high volume dust collectors. My SawStop attaches to a 2HP cyclone via a 4” ducting. My saw uses 220v so power is a consideration as is space.

I agree totally with the opinion that a big box light weight table saw or contractor saw will be disappointing. The problems include inadequate power, poor fence, and flexing trunion. I would choose an MFT plus TS55 or TS75 over a cheap table saw.
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Other Tools & Accessories / Re: Carter guides for Hammer band saw...
« Last post by rst on Yesterday at 05:38 PM »
I set my bandsaw blades by inserting a piece of office paper between the blade and guide on one side, been using this method for 50+ years.
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It's a normal prepaid debit card. If it could only be used on Festool tools, we'd have made it green and called it the SYScard or something.

Great... Now you've totally made me want a SYScard.
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