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Sales & Dealer Area / Re: Better Methods for Building Cabinets
« Last post by tjbnwi on Today at 09:10 AM »
I have relied heavily on Marc Sommerfelds videos and products and built many cabinets from 30" to 96" and they are always strong.  I am, however, going to take a page out of Tom's post and use screw on backs rather than rabbets and dados.  Bill

I do place the backs in a groove. I cut them about 1/32” shy of the width, then screw them in place. Having them in place allows me to move the cabinets without racking them. Once they’re ready for finish I pull the backs.

My preferred method of finish is pull the face frame, finish, reinstall, but with all of the panelized ends it’s not possible on most of these cabinets.

In the photo below you can see the dado for the back panel.

It use 1/2” back panels because most installers get carried away tightening the screws and don’t bother shiming behind the attachment point.

This set of uppers will be installed on French cleats, the uppers are 13” deep.

Tom
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Sales & Dealer Area / Re: Better Methods for Building Cabinets
« Last post by GoingMyWay on Today at 09:08 AM »
Thanks for sharing the video.  A video always makes things clearer.  Is that you in the video?  It's cool getting to see what a poster looks like in real life!
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Member Projects / Re: [Project 7] 7-drawer Sys-port
« Last post by Cheese on Today at 09:07 AM »
Hey Matt, things are looking good, I need to make a couple of those myself.

FWIW...rather than spending $535 for a LR 32 Set, I purchased the Woodpeckers Shelf Pin Template for $69. It's a great alternative if you don't make a bunch of cabinets everyday. 

https://www.woodpeck.com/shelfpintemplate.html

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Member Projects / Re: Swing Boom Arm
« Last post by mccrich on Today at 09:06 AM »
Mario, here is what I use for tool-less, movable french cleats. Note that the cleat uses a screwed-on base (not glued) so you can get it on and off the wall. You place the cleat on the wall, screw on the base and then tighten the socket head cap screw, which is mounted in a threaded insert, to hold it in the position you desire. I can tighten the cap screw enough by hand that it will bite into the bottom of the wall mount strip to hold the cleat in position. For heavier or longer cleats I sometimes use two cap screws.
Enjoying your post.
Richard
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Home Improvement & Other Projects / Re: Options for bump in a floor
« Last post by Deke on Today at 09:06 AM »
Is there an unfinished basement under the kitchen that you can look up to see joists/beam and flooring?  You're likely right about a beam being the issue.

I've dealt with this problem many times.  The usual solution is to shim the floor in the low spots.  As you mentioned this can cause issues at doors.  New thresholds to deal with the different floor heights at each doorway is the answer.

I know a guy that believes the answer is to lower the beam.  These beams usually run the entire length of the house and are holding up an awful lot of the house.  I wouldn't take on that task lightly.  Still, its an option to consider.     

Thanks, just saw this after my last reply. Believe it or not, the basement has a plaster lathe ceiling covered by a drop ceiling. With the beam probably holding up three floors above it, I'm leaving it alone! :-) I guess the shimming plus four new thresholds is a much better option than doing anything to that beam. Plus the basement is my shop - I couldn't live with tearing it all up. Thanks again.
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Home Improvement & Other Projects / Re: Options for bump in a floor
« Last post by Deke on Today at 09:02 AM »
You can do ceramic, just takes more prep/money.

My guess is the is 1/4” underlayment over the sleepers, under the vinyl. Remove the vinyl and all remnants of the backing. Sometimes it is easier to cut and pull the underlayment and replace it.

At the low point install a strip of plywood of the thickness that levels to the high point. You now have a wedge that can be screeded in with self leveling compound.

Plug any opening the SLC can leak through.

Mapie markets a plastics lath you staple to the sub-floor. Prime the sub-floor with the proper primer, staple down the lath, mix the SLC, place using an inverted bow rack to massage the SLC into place. This process is not easy easy as it sounds to get it right but it is well worth the effort.

If you do go with the hardwood you may just be able to fit strips of plywood, sand edges to blend and use roofing felt strips to shim the floor acceptably flat.

If you go with the hardwood run it perpendicular to the floor joist.

Tom

You are the MAN! Thanks!!! This may have added to our budget (or my work), but it is probably worth it in the end. Oh, most importantly, what new Festools should I tell my wife I need to do this? TS55 would be nice! :-)
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Is there an unfinished basement under the kitchen that you can look up to see joists/beam and flooring?  You're likely right about a beam being the issue.

I've dealt with this problem many times.  The usual solution is to shim the floor in the low spots.  As you mentioned this can cause issues at doors.  New thresholds to deal with the different floor heights at each doorway is the answer.

I know a guy that believes the answer is to lower the beam.  These beams usually run the entire length of the house and are holding up an awful lot of the house.  I wouldn't take on that task lightly.  Still, its an option to consider.       
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Sales & Dealer Area / Re: Better Methods for Building Cabinets
« Last post by tjbnwi on Today at 09:01 AM »

8’ Miter locks and a bunch of T&G with pocket screws.


Well you've certainly got the lock miter down pat.  [not worthy]  I'm assuming you used a router on a rail for that?

(Attachment Link)

@Cheese

Don’t be taken aback by the fat old ugly guy in the video.....



Tom
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Home Improvement & Other Projects / Re: Options for bump in a floor
« Last post by tjbnwi on Today at 08:55 AM »
You can do ceramic, just takes more prep/money.

My guess is the is 1/4” underlayment over the sleepers, under the vinyl. Remove the vinyl and all remnants of the backing. Sometimes it is easier to cut and pull the underlayment and replace it.

At the low point install a strip of plywood of the thickness that levels to the high point. You now have a wedge that can be screeded in with self leveling compound.

Plug any opening the SLC can leak through.

Mapie markets a plastics lath you staple to the sub-floor. Prime the sub-floor with the proper primer, staple down the lath, mix the SLC, place using an inverted bow rack to massage the SLC into place. This process is not easy easy as it sounds to get it right but it is well worth the effort.

If you do go with the hardwood you may just be able to fit strips of plywood, sand edges to blend and use roofing felt strips to shim the floor acceptably flat.

If you go with the hardwood run it perpendicular to the floor joist.

Tom
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Sales & Dealer Area / Re: Better Methods for Building Cabinets
« Last post by Billedis on Today at 08:47 AM »
I have relied heavily on Marc Sommerfelds videos and products and built many cabinets from 30" to 96" and they are always strong.  I am, however, going to take a page out of Tom's post and use screw on backs rather than rabbets and dados.  Bill
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