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Thanks to everyone for the info.  [smile]
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Festool Tools & Accessories / TSC 55 + Parallel Guide?
« Last post by David on Today at 10:06 PM »
I know it works with the TS 55, but does it work with the cordless version of that saw? Thank you!
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MDF is reliably flat and paints well. For face frame work flatness that may not matter as much.  Plywood is certainly lighter and more pleasant to cut.


I’m about to build a cabinet and was looking at the purebond plywood at the big box store.  If using MDF, how well does MDF hold up to screws?  And what screws recommended for mdf?

Look into Spax MDF screws.

Tom

Thanks.  Will search for them.  Will MDF hold up well to domino for alignment?

Yes, MDF is hard on cutters, get an extra one before you start.

Tom

Thanks for that advice.  Do people typically use MDf for sides, top, and bottoms only?  How about drawer construction?  Best to go with a plywood?
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MDF is reliably flat and paints well. For face frame work flatness that may not matter as much.  Plywood is certainly lighter and more pleasant to cut.


I’m about to build a cabinet and was looking at the purebond plywood at the big box store.  If using MDF, how well does MDF hold up to screws?  And what screws recommended for mdf?

Look into Spax MDF screws.

Tom

Thanks.  Will search for them.  Will MDF hold up well to domino for alignment?

Yes, MDF is hard on cutters, get an extra one before you start.

Tom
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MDF is reliably flat and paints well. For face frame work flatness that may not matter as much.  Plywood is certainly lighter and more pleasant to cut.


I’m about to build a cabinet and was looking at the purebond plywood at the big box store.  If using MDF, how well does MDF hold up to screws?  And what screws recommended for mdf?

Look into Spax MDF screws.

Tom

Thanks.  Will search for them.  Will MDF hold up well to domino for alignment?
6
MDF is reliably flat and paints well. For face frame work flatness that may not matter as much.  Plywood is certainly lighter and more pleasant to cut.


I’m about to build a cabinet and was looking at the purebond plywood at the big box store.  If using MDF, how well does MDF hold up to screws?  And what screws recommended for mdf?

Look into Spax MDF screws.

Tom
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Festool Tools & Accessories / Re: OF1400 Edge guide vs guide stop?
« Last post by Corwin on Today at 09:20 PM »
In addition to allowing one to use the router on a guide rail,  there are a couple of 'other' uses for the Guide Stop that members have discovered (and rediscovered) here:

Support for OF1400

Circle cutting jigs. (ROUTERS)

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MDF is reliably flat and paints well. For face frame work flatness that may not matter as much.  Plywood is certainly lighter and more pleasant to cut.


I’m about to build a cabinet and was looking at the purebond plywood at the big box store.  If using MDF, how well does MDF hold up to screws?  And what screws recommended for mdf?
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Member Projects / Re: Hockey Lockers
« Last post by jobsworth on Today at 08:51 PM »
nice work
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Various Woodworking & Crafts Topics / Re: Drying wood
« Last post by HarveyWildes on Today at 08:48 PM »
A true solar kiln gives you a high degree of control over the temperature, and then you need to dry the wood according to standard drying schedules to avoid ruining it.

You're in Arizona where the relative humidity is low to begin with.  I would just sticker it, strap it (ratcheting straps every 2-3 feet), and put something over the top to keep the direct sun and rain off.  That works well for me in Colorado, and my 2" planks are dry to about 6-8% MC after a year - about the same as commercially bought hardwood in my shop after a couple of weeks.  I usually have some end checking and minimal twist, cupping, or bowing.  I normally get 1 1/2 to 1 1/4 inch thick boards out of rough planks that start out at 2" thick, over 8 feet.  You probably could do better than that if you built a true solar kiln.

I'd be leery of a total plastic wrap because it will heat the wood under direct sun during the day and then it will cool at night.  If you open it up more, then you end up with my solution, but I prefer tarps that breath a bit more to plastic.  Also, put plastic under the 2x4s that your wood is resting on so that ground moisture (such as there is in Arizona) doesn't affect the bottom layers - make sure all plastic/tarp layers drain, and make sure that none of the wood you are drying is in direct contact with moisture.

The latex paint will help, but I haven't found anything that totally eliminates end-checking.


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