Author Topic: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?  (Read 46997 times)

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Offline Holmz

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #120 on: June 07, 2015, 05:41 PM »

P.S. it's Flemish.  [tongue]

Next you will trading in the doubles and triples for Budwiser and Coors.

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Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #121 on: June 07, 2015, 05:55 PM »
Regarding the dimensions of plywood sheet goods, and any comments regarding their real actual size, may I refer you to the Australian Standard, page 5  - 2400X1200.

http://www.ewp.asn.au/library/downloads/facts_about_plywood.pdf

@Alex @Rick Christopherson
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 05:57 PM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline WarnerConstCo.

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #122 on: June 07, 2015, 06:00 PM »
Meh, who cares.

Offline Alex

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #123 on: June 07, 2015, 06:03 PM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does.

You're Canadian, so this doesn't apply directly to you, though you speak as an Imperial user here, but for the rest of the world, Imperial = USA. And the USA is actually extremely forceful in spreading it's cultural dominance all around the world. Like from that movie ... "Inside every gook there's an American dying to get out".

And along with the Big Macs and the action movies we like, we are also showered with Imperial, which we don't like. We pay good money for the Big Macs and the movies, and give our criticism on Imperial for free.

Offline T. Ernsberger

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #124 on: June 07, 2015, 06:05 PM »

Offline SittingElf

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #125 on: June 07, 2015, 06:13 PM »
I'm surprised at those statistics, Reiska.

I spent some time with a few Finns and they were experts at drinking beer and throwing darts. They explained it as, "What would you do if it's dark all the time?".

I spent a lot of time with Italians and they drank coffee all day and all night. Never a cappuccino past 9:00 AM. Espresso every hour or so the rest of the day and into the evening.


Tom

One more fun statistic:

The country with the most Starbucks per capita is:............. Singapore!  That's along with a large number of OTHER coffee chains as well.   [scratch chin] [big grin]

Cheers,

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Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #126 on: June 07, 2015, 06:16 PM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does.

You're Canadian, so this doesn't apply directly to you, though you speak as an Imperial user here, but for the rest of the world, Imperial = USA. And the USA is actually extremely forceful in spreading it's cultural dominance all around the world. Like from that movie ... "Inside every gook there's an American dying to get out".

And along with the Big Macs and the action movies we like, we are also showered with Imperial, which we don't like. We pay good money for the Big Macs and the movies, and give our criticism on Imperial for free.

Alex, in another forum, I might have added support to your comments here regarding the cultural and economic imperialism of the United States.

But surely here on the FOG our debate should stick to the facts ( or our personal interpretation and thoughts) of mathematics and the structures and properties of wood products as they apply to measurement systems.

-----------

Interesting that two recent posts are now attempting to take the ball and play elsewhere!  [smile]
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 06:19 PM by Untidy Shop »
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― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline DB10

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #127 on: June 07, 2015, 07:20 PM »
Meh, who cares.

Agree!!!
Yep this subject is now officially, flogged to death!

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1920
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #128 on: June 07, 2015, 09:06 PM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does.

You're Canadian, so this doesn't apply directly to you, though you speak as an Imperial user here, but for the rest of the world, Imperial = USA. And the USA is actually extremely forceful in spreading it's cultural dominance all around the world. Like from that movie ... "Inside every gook there's an American dying to get out".

And along with the Big Macs and the action movies we like, we are also showered with Imperial, which we don't like. We pay good money for the Big Macs and the movies, and give our criticism on Imperial for free.

Alas we get to the crux of the matter, this has little to do with weights and measures and more to do with anti-America sentiments.
+1

Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1837
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #129 on: June 07, 2015, 09:39 PM »
Frustrations with Imperial doesn't equate to being Anti-American. Alex is a thoughtful and important member of this community. When you hear something that bothers you from such a person it might be an opportunity for a little self-assessment.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Paul G

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #130 on: June 07, 2015, 10:13 PM »
Frustrations with Imperial doesn't equate to being Anti-American. Alex is a thoughtful and important member of this community. When you hear something that bothers you from such a person it might be an opportunity for a little self-assessment.

Yea, I woke up this morning thinking I'd like to force my cultural dominance all around the world. But then which culture would that be since I'm an immigrant to America. Oops.

No, I wake up like most folks just wanting to earn a living.

FTR, I have nothing against Alex and greatly appreciated his contributions. But I can't for the life of me understand why folks in other countries get their buns tied in knots over what weights and measures we use here. I could care less that my relatives in Sweden, Canada and China use metric, and if I were to sell product in their countries it wouldn't surprise or bother me in the least that they would desire those products to be in metric.
+1

Offline RL

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #131 on: June 07, 2015, 10:24 PM »
+1

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #132 on: June 07, 2015, 11:37 PM »
Starting to get into the weeds here with the country vs. country type stuff.

Seth


Offline jacko9

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #133 on: June 07, 2015, 11:44 PM »
Starting to get into the weeds here with the country vs. country type stuff.

Seth

Yep

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 5698
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #134 on: June 08, 2015, 02:25 AM »
Alas we get to the crux of the matter, this has little to do with weights and measures and more to do with anti-America sentiments.

No, this has nothing to do with anti-America sentiments. I was simply bringing this up to show how metricland is exposed to imperial. You should not interpret this so negative, Paul, this really has only to do with weights and measures.

Starting to get into the weeds here with the country vs. country type stuff.

Alex, in another forum, I might have added support to your comments here regarding the cultural and economic imperialism of the United States.

But surely here on the FOG our debate should stick to the facts ( or our personal interpretation and thoughts) of mathematics and the structures and properties of wood products as they apply to measurement systems.

Yes, I'm sorry to bring this up, I don't want to go anywhere near a political discussion, but I was asked by two people "Why is it important to you", and I can't answer that without going a bit into our cultural differences and where and how they meet.

I'll shut up now.  [wink]
 
« Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 02:37 AM by Alex »

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #135 on: June 08, 2015, 02:31 AM »
Regarding the dimensions of plywood sheet goods, and any comments regarding their real actual size, may I refer you to the Australian Standard, page 5  - 2400X1200.

http://www.ewp.asn.au/library/downloads/facts_about_plywood.pdf

@Alex @Rick Christopherson

At work today in the TimberYard, I cross checked three sheets of ply, two made in Australia and one imported from Brazil. All were 2400X1200mm.

Within the European Union why are similar sheet goods 2440X1220mm which is closer to 8X4 feet? Is this because some sheet goods are imported from North America? What size are those made in Scandinavia for the European Market?

I am not trying to reserect the metric/imperial debate here, but some comments in this thread regarding sheet sizes have raised my curiosity.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 02:35 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Alex

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #136 on: June 08, 2015, 02:39 AM »
Europe hardly grows any wood by itself. We import almost all wood and a lot of it comes from North and South America.

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #137 on: June 08, 2015, 05:04 AM »
Regarding the dimensions of plywood sheet goods, and any comments regarding their real actual size, may I refer you to the Australian Standard, page 5  - 2400X1200.

http://www.ewp.asn.au/library/downloads/facts_about_plywood.pdf

@Alex @Rick Christopherson

At work today in the TimberYard, I cross checked three sheets of ply, two made in Australia and one imported from Brazil. All were 2400X1200mm.

Within the European Union why are similar sheet goods 2440X1220mm which is closer to 8X4 feet? Is this because some sheet goods are imported from North America? What size are those made in Scandinavia for the European Market?

I am not trying to reserect the metric/imperial debate here, but some comments in this thread regarding sheet sizes have raised my curiosity.

I've noticed many anomalies myself.

When you checked, were you checking markings or actual measurements?

Must be a real nuisance if your standard supply varies.

I buy from Brunzyeel in Brookvale ... check out the mix in their 1200's v's 1220's ...

http://www.bruynzeel.com.au/products/plywoods.aspx

I'd be curious whether many Aussie builders get stuck having framed with 610mm stud centres expecting 1220mm sheet goods and end up with 1200mm sheets?

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric? Ply sizes.
« Reply #138 on: June 08, 2015, 06:59 AM »
Hi Kev,

At work, actual with Lufkin metric tape measure and assisted by a work colleague who was quite bemused!  [big grin]

I knew the result would be 2400X1200 but the discussion here on the FOG had raised some doubts. I checked a sheet of marine, non-structural and exterior ply.

After reading your reply, have just been down to the Untidy Shop and measured a sheet of 19mm Brazilian non-structural ply and one of Australian 32mm HoopPine.




However found some MDF that was 1215mm in width.  [eek]

By the way, most timber stud centres around here are 450mm, 600 is max.

Is your Supplier selling Aussie or imported ply? He seems to have two main sizes 2400X1200 and 2440X1220mm.

References
http://www.australply.com.au/index.php/products/austral-premium-ac-ext
http://www.ewp.asn.au/library/downloads/facts_about_plywood.pdf
http://www.build.com.au/installing-plasterboard-walls-and-insulation

@Kev
« Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 07:13 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric? Ply sizes.
« Reply #139 on: June 08, 2015, 11:13 AM »
Hi Kev,

At work, actual with Lufkin metric tape measure and assisted by a work colleague who was quite bemused!  [big grin]

I knew the result would be 2400X1200 but the discussion here on the FOG had raised some doubts. I checked a sheet of marine, non-structural and exterior ply.

After reading your reply, have just been down to the Untidy Shop and measured a sheet of 19mm Brazilian non-structural ply and one of Australian 32mm HoopPine.

(Attachment Link)


However found some MDF that was 1215mm in width.  [eek]

By the way, most timber stud centres around here are 450mm, 600 is max.

Is your Supplier selling Aussie or imported ply? He seems to have two main sizes 2400X1200 and 2440X1220mm.

References
http://www.australply.com.au/index.php/products/austral-premium-ac-ext
http://www.ewp.asn.au/library/downloads/facts_about_plywood.pdf
http://www.build.com.au/installing-plasterboard-walls-and-insulation

@Kev

Agree on centres ... hence the curiosity! [smile]

I've been side tracked looked at hours of youtube videos on the various ply sheet good and ply faced door making machines and techniques. Wanna buy a factory? http://www.plywoodplantmachinery.com  [big grin] [big grin]

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric? Ply sizes.
« Reply #140 on: June 08, 2015, 06:12 PM »
Quote from: Untidy Shop link=topic=40629.msg400652#msg400652 date=1433761175
[/quote

Agree on centres ... hence the curiosity! [smile]

I've been side tracked looked at hours of youtube videos on the various ply sheet good and ply faced door making machines and techniques. Wanna buy a factory? http://www.plywoodplantmachinery.com  [big grin] [big grin]

No thanks. Given Alex's comment re the state of European Timber production (and my own observations in 2006) there is an obvious reason for its sale.  [smile] I note that one of the selling points they make is the quality and condition of the machinery because it has not been in constant use.

@Kev  @Alex
« Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 06:17 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline andvari

  • Posts: 423
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #141 on: June 08, 2015, 10:37 PM »
Some history behind this....

Thomas Jefferson proposed adoption of a decimal measurement system to the US Congress in 1790, before the French adopted their Metric System. As ambassador to France he had many discussions with the French about the desirability of such a system. Jefferson was successful in getting the US to adopt a decimal currency, perhaps the first such in the world in 1784. Unfortunately Congress did not adopt his system of weights and measures. This would have been the time to do it as then the US had no real standards, just a lot of local customs.

Many historians believe that without the influence of Jefferson on France they would have not adopted a decimal system of measurement. The French didn't waste their opportunity - they started the conversion after the revolution. It's also interesting that some French experiments with decimalization failed - for example the French tried a 10 hour per day clock, with decimal divisions of the hours. You can even find some clocks with this decimal time system in museums. Ultimately the French efforts to impose the metric system were not at all smooth. Napoleon even put it in abeyance for a while.

At present, officially the US has adopted the metric system. It is a signatory to every one of the international metric system treaties and is one of the 17 original signatories to the Treaty of the Metre. However conversion while in progress is going to take a long, long time.

Some branches of the US Government have been using the metric system since the early 1800's, such as the US Coastal and Geodetic Survey.

The US switched to defining the units of inches, pounds and so forth in terms of the base metric units in 1893, the so-called Mendenhal order. This definition is really the end of the English system of units in the US, and establishes a new standard, some call the US traditional measures.

In 1964 the US National Bureau of Standards adopted the use of the Metric System for all of its work excluding a few rare cases where this would obviously be detrimental.

During the 1970's there was a significant effort to metricize the US top down. This failed miserably and is now used as a case study in marketing and management courses taught in the US on why such things are difficult to impossible.

What we have now is a system where both metric measures and traditional units are in commerce at the same time. There are no regulations that force either metric or US units, however government procurement is exerting some pressure, as is international trade.

Liter soda bottles are the standard in stores now. Many other food packages are metric sized. The trend there is probably the furthest along.

For woodworkers in the US it's unlikely they will see a 5cm x 10cm stick any time soon. It seems everywhere this type of commodity is one of the slowest to change to metric standards anywhere there is a metrification because buildings themselves have a very long life cycle.

For me anyway I have an interesting situation. My workshop has mostly tools with metric scales and dimensions, however my raw materials are pretty much have US traditional dimensions.

So anyway you can call on the US to adopt the metric system if you want. But realize in many ways it already has. What it hasn't done is impose metric measurements on articles of commerce by law. That was already tried once unsuccessfully. Even if it worked some things like lumber and sheet goods would probably not have changed in actual physical form at all because of the existing inventory of structures.

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Offline Daver

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #142 on: June 09, 2015, 04:34 AM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does. I'm quite happy working in metric and imperial and easily convert between the two. I use what makes most sense at the time.

When cooking we say a tablespoon of this, a pinch of that, a teaspoon of the other etc. we all know instantly what that means. We can visualize it straight away. I don't need some euro technocrat in Brussels to tell me I have to convert everything into grams and conform with people in another country! This is why so many people in the UK and elsewhere are fed up with the EU. (I'm making a general point, not directing it to Alex.).

I was brought up in metric but imperial has a feel to it that seems right. 1/4" tenon, 3/8" hole, 1/8" reveal, 3/4" rebate.

Actually it's amazing how little I use a ruler to be honest. When I make furniture I size pieces according to what looks right.

P.S. it's Flemish.  [tongue]

Yes, I know (!) I was just trying to come up with a small country with a language spoken by only a few. I didn't want to get into the whole Walloon/ Flemish/ Dutch/ French debate! Maybe I should have said Denmark instead.

*The following is not a political position. It's a beer position.*

LEAVE BELGIUM ALONE


 [popcorn]
 [thumbs up]
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Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #143 on: June 09, 2015, 07:31 AM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does. I'm quite happy working in metric and imperial and easily convert between the two. I use what makes most sense at the time.

When cooking we say a tablespoon of this, a pinch of that, a teaspoon of the other etc. we all know instantly what that means. We can visualize it straight away. I don't need some euro technocrat in Brussels to tell me I have to convert everything into grams and conform with people in another country! This is why so many people in the UK and elsewhere are fed up with the EU. (I'm making a general point, not directing it to Alex.).

I was brought up in metric but imperial has a feel to it that seems right. 1/4" tenon, 3/8" hole, 1/8" reveal, 3/4" rebate.

Actually it's amazing how little I use a ruler to be honest. When I make furniture I size pieces according to what looks right.

P.S. it's Flemish.  [tongue]

Yes, I know (!) I was just trying to come up with a small country with a language spoken by only a few. I didn't want to get into the whole Walloon/ Flemish/ Dutch/ French debate! Maybe I should have said Denmark instead.

*The following is not a political position. It's a beer position.*

LEAVE BELGIUM ALONE
(Attachment Link)

 [popcorn]
 [thumbs up]

Chimay here (Oz) is about the same price as a medium to good bottle of wine! Haven't tried it to be honest. I take it you like it??

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #144 on: June 09, 2015, 08:47 AM »
Why do some people feel the need to force a minority to change? We don't ask Belgians to quit speaking Belgian because virtually nobody else does. I'm quite happy working in metric and imperial and easily convert between the two. I use what makes most sense at the time.

When cooking we say a tablespoon of this, a pinch of that, a teaspoon of the other etc. we all know instantly what that means. We can visualize it straight away. I don't need some euro technocrat in Brussels to tell me I have to convert everything into grams and conform with people in another country! This is why so many people in the UK and elsewhere are fed up with the EU. (I'm making a general point, not directing it to Alex.).

I was brought up in metric but imperial has a feel to it that seems right. 1/4" tenon, 3/8" hole, 1/8" reveal, 3/4" rebate.

Actually it's amazing how little I use a ruler to be honest. When I make furniture I size pieces according to what looks right.

P.S. it's Flemish.  [tongue]

Yes, I know (!) I was just trying to come up with a small country with a language spoken by only a few. I didn't want to get into the whole Walloon/ Flemish/ Dutch/ French debate! Maybe I should have said Denmark instead.

*The following is not a political position. It's a beer position.*

LEAVE BELGIUM ALONE
(Attachment Link)

 [popcorn]
 [thumbs up]

Chimay here (Oz) is about the same price as a medium to good bottle of wine! Haven't tried it to be honest. I take it you like it??

@Kev

Same in the US, but it is worth it for an occasional treat. Best to share a bottle or several with buddies, preferably whilst the meat is smoking.

What boggles my mind is how you Aussies can grow the grapes, make the wine, buy the bottle & label, fill it, ship it to the US, sell it at wholesale and then the retailer can sell me a bottle of Oz wine for seven or eight bucks?!?!? International trade and finance are beyond me.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2665
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric with wine.
« Reply #145 on: June 09, 2015, 09:54 AM »
 
Richard, please do not drink that factory wine!

Here is a list of regions that produce very good to excellent Australian  wine (and in Metric bottles  [big grin]).

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/travel/destinations/2013/07/10-of-australias-best-wine-regions

There are other Regions, but these are a good start. Also look for wines from grapes grown on the Bellarine Peninsula and around the LimeStoneCoast.

http://www.thebellarinetastetrail.com.au/discover/wineries/group,id,1173,1-1.aspx

http://limestonecoastwine.com.au/regional-info/regions/

@Richard/RMW. @Kev

Edit
And my favourite Australian wine, trouble is the price is now reaching Festool proportions -

http://sallyspaddock.com.au/product/sallys-paddock/
« Last Edit: June 09, 2015, 10:29 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4946
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #146 on: June 09, 2015, 10:22 AM »
@Kev
Treat yourself to a Chimay, delicious. I usually drink Chimay in the fall and winter months when I enjoy a heartier brew. Use the Chimay glass shown or some type of open goblet. Chimay advises that like a red wine, the beer needs to open up and the style of glass does affect the flavor.

From the Chimay website:
Chimay is an authentic Trappist beer. That means that it is brewed within the walls of a Trappist monastery under the control and responsibility of the community of monks, and whose revenue is devoted to social service.

The “Authentic Trappist Product" logo is granted by the International Trappist Association.
It guarantees the consumer the Trappist origin of the products according to well-established principles:

1. They are manufactured on-site or in close proximity to the monastery.
2. The monastic community is engaged in management and all aspects of the means necessary for their operation. This must clearly reflect both the unquestionably subordinate relationship with the beneficiary monastery and the relationship with the culture of the enterprise itself in the plan of monastic life.
3. The income provides for the major portion of the necessities of the community and for social services.

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3039
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #147 on: June 09, 2015, 10:36 AM »
I prefer the blue Chimay to the red, but they also make a gold which I've never had. I also like Duvel a lot.

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric with wine.
« Reply #148 on: June 09, 2015, 01:34 PM »

Richard, please do not drink that factory wine!

Here is a list of regions that produce very good to excellent Australian  wine (and in Metric bottles  [big grin]).

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/travel/destinations/2013/07/10-of-australias-best-wine-regions

There are other Regions, but these are a good start. Also look for wines from grapes grown on the Bellarine Peninsula and around the LimeStoneCoast.

http://www.thebellarinetastetrail.com.au/discover/wineries/group,id,1173,1-1.aspx

http://limestonecoastwine.com.au/regional-info/regions/

@Richard/RMW. @Kev

Edit
And my favourite Australian wine, trouble is the price is now reaching Festool proportions -

http://sallyspaddock.com.au/product/sallys-paddock/

@Untidy Shop thanks for the recommendations, I'll add it to my list for the next trip to a decent wine store. On our little island we are a tad limited.

Gotta admit my taste in beer is (somewhat) more sophisticated than in wine. For Aussie vino we generally make our choice of the Yellow Tail based on label color, i.e. "Honey, do you want the purple or blue one today?".

Now for bourbon and cervasas, I am a touch more particular, and it never bothers me that one is 750 ML and the other 12 OZ...

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric with wine.
« Reply #149 on: June 09, 2015, 01:37 PM »

Richard, please do not drink that factory wine!

Here is a list of regions that produce very good to excellent Australian  wine (and in Metric bottles  [big grin]).

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/travel/destinations/2013/07/10-of-australias-best-wine-regions

There are other Regions, but these are a good start. Also look for wines from grapes grown on the Bellarine Peninsula and around the LimeStoneCoast.

http://www.thebellarinetastetrail.com.au/discover/wineries/group,id,1173,1-1.aspx

http://limestonecoastwine.com.au/regional-info/regions/

@Richard/RMW. @Kev

Edit
And my favourite Australian wine, trouble is the price is now reaching Festool proportions -

http://sallyspaddock.com.au/product/sallys-paddock/

@Untidy Shop thanks for the recommendations, I'll add it to my list for the next trip to a decent wine store. On our little island we are a tad limited.

Gotta admit my taste in beer is (somewhat) more sophisticated than in wine. For Aussie vino we generally make our choice of the Yellow Tail based on label color, i.e. "Honey, do you want the purple or blue one today?".

Now for bourbon and cervasas, I am a touch more particular, and it never bothers me that one is 750 ML and the other 12 OZ...

RMW

And, at the risk of quoting myself, why the heck are American Bourbon's in 750 ML bottles?

Now there's a question to keep me up at night...

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!