Author Topic: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?  (Read 38493 times)

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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2015, 01:02 AM »


Does anyone else see the irony of having a cup of tea in this thread? ;)

No. It is 8 oz. or 236.588 ml. Not a cup.  ::)  [tongue]

Seth

hmmm... [clears throat]
Most teacups are 4 to 6 oz.

There is 5-oz TeaCup-125 and the 6-oz TeaCup-150.

Aaah, yes, teacup not measuring cup.  [doh]

But if we are talking tea cups of varying sizes , might as well throw in coffee cups too.  [wink] At US coffee shops 16 oz. , 20 oz. , and 24 oz. are common.  [big grin]


Seth

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Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #31 on: June 06, 2015, 01:04 AM »


Does anyone else see the irony of having a cup of tea in this thread? ;)

No. It is 8 oz. or 236.588 ml. Not a cup.  ::)  [tongue]

Seth

hmmm... [clears throat]
Most teacups are 4 to 6 oz.

There is 5-oz TeaCup-125 and the 6-oz TeaCup-150.

Well actually you are both correct.  There is a U.S. Cup and an UK Cup. 
Now we have something else to discuss/debate; whose cup is more accurate, for the Cups now runneth over!? [eek]  [smile]

http://www.traditionaloven.com/culinary-arts/volume/convert-cup-uk-to-cup-us.html

@SRSemenza @Holmz
« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 01:07 AM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Mr Heavy

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2015, 01:08 AM »
I've got to get back to my boat building project, It's starting to get rather cloudy so time may be short.

I DEMAND a saw scale marked in milicubits, well, actually centicubits as milicubits aren't visible with the naked eye and...

The tracksaw  kerf needs to be relabelled as Cbt/150 too as I'm cutting my gopherwood a little too short which means that when I eventually pitch it with pitch within and pitch it with pitch without, I'll need more pitch than I pitched for at the auction.

What's the sheckel price per cubic cubit in your local yard, btw? Is it cheaper Adzed or do you get it gophered all round to save time?

Oops got to go - the camels are threatening the giraffes again and the badgers are fretting..
Sys4 with cheese sandwich, a small pork pie with Tabasco sauce, a nice bottle of dry, vintage Prosecco and three reusable ice packs. Olives with pimento and a capon, roast in Dijon mustard. Several slices of fresh pineapple, a scale model of the Eiffel tower made from noodles, black forest gateau and a gingham table cloth for the MFT-3. A block of Parmesan and a Stanley 2" chisel for grating.
Sys3 with a half bottle of La Fée Absinthe, a spoon and vodka-soaked mint with Rothenberger blow-torch.
125 year old balsamic vinegar in spray bottle.
Ibuprofen and a pair of handcuffs. 2 loaves, 5 (very) small fishes, some bread, broken. A goblet of blood-red wine, a hammer... nails

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #33 on: June 06, 2015, 01:12 AM »

Well actually you are both correct.  There is a U.S. Cup and an UK Cup. 
Now we have something else to discuss/debate; whose cup is more accurate, for the Cups now runneth over!? [eek]  [smile]



In which case you probably should have used a pint.  [scared]

We all might need pint before this is done  [blink]

Seth

Offline Mort

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2015, 01:16 AM »



But if we are talking tea cups of varying sizes , might as well throw in coffee cups too.  [wink] At US coffee shops 16 oz. , 20 oz. , and 24 oz. are common.  [big grin]


Seth

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I hate signatures.

Offline Kev

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2015, 01:56 AM »
Is there any irony in the fact that of all the country names on the planet, America is the closest to having the word Metric spelt within it?

aMETRICa

Hmmm
« Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 03:39 AM by Kev »

Offline Kev

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2015, 02:00 AM »
I must admit I've always preferred MPG, not litres per 100km. The paradigm shifted from a big number being good to a small number being good [blink]

Offline Alex

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2015, 02:26 AM »
How about coffee cups? They are more my cup of tea.

Offline charley1968

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2015, 05:12 AM »
How about coffee-shops to discuss this further..?
Just for today..

Online Holmz

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2015, 05:39 AM »

...
At US coffee shops 16 oz. , 20 oz. , and 24 oz. are common.  [big grin]


Seth

Seth- Starbucks is now a worldwide phenomenon these days.

However the Australian coffee is about as good as it gets.

If I get a tripple shot latte in the kiddie cup (5 oz??) at Starbucks it is not bad.

The coffee is over roasted, so it is bitter and oily, but it is the same exact beans that my local roaster uses... Only the local felow is a craftsman, so he takes pride in doing it perfect...

Offline charley1968

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2015, 05:45 AM »
..snigger..
Just for today..

Offline Daver

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2015, 06:04 AM »
What's the sheckel price per cubic cubit in your local yard, btw? Is it cheaper Adzed or do you get it gophered all round to save time?

Oops got to go - the camels are threatening the giraffes again and the badgers are fretting..

This brings to mind the age old query of how many pancakes it takes to shingle a dog's house. [poke]
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2015, 09:12 AM »


Does anyone else see the irony of having a cup of tea in this thread? ;)

No. It is 8 oz. or 236.588 ml. Not a cup.  ::)  [tongue]

Seth

hmmm... [clears throat]
Most teacups are 4 to 6 oz.

There is 5-oz TeaCup-125 and the 6-oz TeaCup-150.

Well actually you are both correct.  There is a U.S. Cup and an UK Cup. 
Now we have something else to discuss/debate; whose cup is more accurate, for the Cups now runneth over!? [eek]  [smile]

http://www.traditionaloven.com/culinary-arts/volume/convert-cup-uk-to-cup-us.html

@SRSemenza @Holmz

And now, for some Texas humor...

There's also a T-cup and a P-cup.  What's the difference?  A T-cup is what you drink T out of, and a P-cup is what you drive to work... 

 [big grin]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline SittingElf

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2015, 09:46 AM »
Quote

And now, for some Texas humor...

There's also a T-cup and a P-cup.  What's the difference?  A T-cup is what you drink T out of, and a P-cup is what you drive to work... 

 [big grin]

Let us not forget A,B,C, and D cups! [tongue]

I tend towards the former, rather than the latter! [big grin]

Frank
Woodworking is 3% talent and 97% paying attention to the FOG! 

hammerfelderowners.com

Offline teocaf

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2015, 10:12 AM »
I thought a P-cup is what you have in your pickup when you are trying to drive across Texas without stopping...
By the way, it takes 12 hours to drive across the great Lone Star state.  When I lived in the ol' western town of El Paso, it was just as quick to drive to San Diego, CA across New Mexico and Arizona, as it was to get to east Dallas.

Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #45 on: June 06, 2015, 10:25 AM »
Texas is bigger than France...


Tom
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Offline bkharman

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #46 on: June 06, 2015, 10:48 AM »

I thought a P-cup is what you have in your pickup when you are trying to drive across Texas without stopping...
By the way, it takes 12 hours to drive across the great Lone Star state.  When I lived in the ol' western town of El Paso, it was just as quick to drive to San Diego, CA across New Mexico and Arizona, as it was to get to east Dallas.

Since this thread has veered waaaaay off corse, this reminded me of that crazy lady the wore diapers and drove from FL to TX to kill someone!!

Ingenuity

People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline Mort

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #47 on: June 06, 2015, 10:51 AM »
She was an astronaut. I wonder if NASA uses metric or standard?
I hate signatures.

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #48 on: June 06, 2015, 10:56 AM »
Starbucks is world wide? Who'da thunk it?  [tongue]    Just running with the cup vs cup vs tea vs coffee idea. I agree, over roasted.

I am curious though ......... in the US every gas station and just about every other business has coffee available. Even if there wasn't a Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts on every corner it would be pretty easy to get coffee almost anytime anywhere. How universal is that?  At least in countries where coffee drinking is prevalent.

Seth

Offline Kev

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #49 on: June 06, 2015, 11:02 AM »
Starbucks is world wide? Who'da thunk it?  [tongue]    Just running with the cup vs cup vs tea vs coffee idea. I agree, over roasted.

I am curious though ......... in the US every gas station and just about every other business has coffee available. Even if there wasn't a Starbucks or Dunkin Donuts on every corner it would be pretty easy to get coffee almost anytime anywhere. How universal is that?  At least in countries where coffee drinking is prevalent.

Seth

Pretty sure the stuff you guys over there drink isn't coffee [huh] about the only place I had a half drinkable coffee was in NY, with the emphasis on half [wink]

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #50 on: June 06, 2015, 11:12 AM »


Pretty sure the stuff you guys over there drink isn't coffee [huh] about the only place I had a half drinkable coffee was in NY, with the emphasis on half [wink]

Yeah, a lot of it is pretty bad.  [sad]

Seth

Offline bkharman

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #51 on: June 06, 2015, 11:43 AM »
I totally agree that the coffee at Starbucks is too acidic and just doesn't taste good. I am lucky that within 5 miles of me (8 clicks to keep this thread related) there are three chaps (not Chavs) that have excellent coffee. I usually go for espresso when it is decent, which is also hard to find sometimes.

We now return you to the nonsensical, global banter which is Metric vs. Imperial.

Cheers. Bryan.
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline charley1968

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #52 on: June 06, 2015, 12:03 PM »
Wasn't the Challenger disaster due to some f...-up between metric and imperial. Or was it some mars-lander?
Just for today..

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #53 on: June 06, 2015, 12:05 PM »
Quote

And now, for some Texas humor...

There's also a T-cup and a P-cup.  What's the difference?  A T-cup is what you drink T out of, and a P-cup is what you drive to work... 

 [big grin]

Let us not forget A,B,C, and D cups! [tongue]

I tend towards the former, rather than the latter! [big grin]

Frank

Then let's put me right in the middle, please.   [tongue]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline bkharman

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #54 on: June 06, 2015, 12:14 PM »
This is the first thing that came to mind during this discussion.



People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline Davej

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #55 on: June 06, 2015, 12:20 PM »
Quote

And now, for some Texas humor...

There's also a T-cup and a P-cup.  What's the difference?  A T-cup is what you drink T out of, and a P-cup is what you drive to work... 

 [big grin]

Let us not forget A,B,C, and D cups! [tongue]

I tend towards the former, rather than the latter! [big grin]

Frank

Then let's put me right in the middle, please.   [tongue]


In the middle ! Would that be a B+ or a C-    [tongue]
I dont mind growing old but i refuse to grow up

Offline Paul G

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #56 on: June 06, 2015, 12:33 PM »
[big grin]Thanks to Shane for pointing this out.....very informative, and I see congress is pushing for the benefits for the US to go metrics I know this is all off topic from Festool but it shows that some guys aren't ready for metrics and complain to Festool why not imperial stickers put in..simply they are Germans and really designed for the European market. So don't expect them to speak English when they are German.

Well, when they are trying to make a buck (or is that a euro) in the US it helps to speak the language (or use the measuring system) of that market. I'm in the US, we use inches, we ask for tools to use inches, not sure why this surprises anyone. I'm not going to Germany and buying Festools there.
+1

Offline Kev

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #57 on: June 06, 2015, 01:01 PM »
[big grin]Thanks to Shane for pointing this out.....very informative, and I see congress is pushing for the benefits for the US to go metrics I know this is all off topic from Festool but it shows that some guys aren't ready for metrics and complain to Festool why not imperial stickers put in..simply they are Germans and really designed for the European market. So don't expect them to speak English when they are German.

Well, when they are trying to make a buck (or is that a euro) in the US it helps to speak the language (or use the measuring system) of that market. I'm in the US, we use inches, we ask for tools to use inches, not sure why this surprises anyone. I'm not going to Germany and buying Festools there.

You really aren't being forced to buy Festool or any other metric calibrated tool that happens to find it's way into your parts of North America.

To be perfectly frank (no, not Frank), I'm happy with either unit of measure and I don't really care if the instruction manuals are in German or English.

I can understand that some may be challenged by something that's new to them and in this case the metric system being new to some US FOG members, but you are aware that the tools with calibrations on them are metric in origin and still metric if not locally converted.

That's life on planet earth [big grin]

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1913
Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #58 on: June 06, 2015, 01:13 PM »
[big grin]Thanks to Shane for pointing this out.....very informative, and I see congress is pushing for the benefits for the US to go metrics I know this is all off topic from Festool but it shows that some guys aren't ready for metrics and complain to Festool why not imperial stickers put in..simply they are Germans and really designed for the European market. So don't expect them to speak English when they are German.

Well, when they are trying to make a buck (or is that a euro) in the US it helps to speak the language (or use the measuring system) of that market. I'm in the US, we use inches, we ask for tools to use inches, not sure why this surprises anyone. I'm not going to Germany and buying Festools there.

You really aren't being forced to buy Festool or any other metric calibrated tool that happens to find it's way into your parts of North America.

To be perfectly frank (no, not Frank), I'm happy with either unit of measure and I don't really care if the instruction manuals are in German or English.

I can understand that some may be challenged by something that's new to them and in this case the metric system being new to some US FOG members, but you are aware that the tools with calibrations on them are metric in origin and still metric if not locally converted.

That's life on planet earth [big grin]

No one said we are forced to buy Festools, just like no one forced them to sell in the US. They chose to sell here and things here mostly work in feet and inches so it's not hard to understand that many folks here want tools with markings in inches. Not sure why folks in other places get their buns in a knot over it.
+1

Offline DrD

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Re: Isn't it about time U.S. went metric?
« Reply #59 on: June 06, 2015, 01:43 PM »
Been reading this for a couple of days now.  It would appear that there are/were 2 simultaneous threads about nearly the same thing - USA going metric and Arrogance of Festool.  I find these both somewhat amusing and a little alarming.  Take Texas for example - the 12th largest economy in the world, and that is only 1 of 50 sovereign States within the USA.  Granted Germany is probably still the 4th largest economy - bolstered greatly by USA sales of Mercedes Benz, VW & all that they own, BMW, and others including Festool, but I digress.  The great majority of teaching and technical publications emanating from the USA are done using imperial measurements.  Most USA citizens are not fluent in metric, most USA business are conducted using Imperial measurements.  Since there is a great pool of NAINA Festool products, one could surmise that Festool spends a good deal of resources in making "changes" in their products to be compatible and compliant with USA requirements.  Why then is it too much to ask for what is sold here to be marked in Imperial measurements?  Why should we, spending our money, bend to a "foreign" system, and some possible "arrogance"?  My BMW's and Infinity's - both made in native metric &/or Shakkan-ho metrics - come to the USA with Imperial metrics. 

Just my $0.02 (not Euros - I don't even have a Euro symbol on my Japanese-based computer keyboard).
Dr.D