Author Topic: Planer? or no?  (Read 5636 times)

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Offline sigmatango

  • Posts: 72
Planer? or no?
« on: February 11, 2017, 01:59 PM »
I am planning to add a planer to my tool assortment soon, but things are tight moneywise. I have a custom loft bed project coming up, and I'll need to surface my material for that. I do have access to a jointer, but I am trying to figure a way to plane thickness without a planer. Suggestions? Thanks!

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Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2017, 03:46 PM »
Would it break your budget to have a larger shop machine the wood for you?
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2017, 07:27 PM »
If the widths of the parts are not great, you can turn the parts on edge and rip them to thickness with a table saw.
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Offline waho6o9

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Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2017, 07:48 PM »
Pay a shop to sand them to thickness with a big sanding machine.


Offline charley1968

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Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2017, 06:04 AM »
Planing by hand?
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Online SRSemenza

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Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2017, 10:49 AM »
I am planning to add a planer to my tool assortment soon, but things are tight moneywise. I have a custom loft bed project coming up, and I'll need to surface my material for that. I do have access to a jointer, but I am trying to figure a way to plane thickness without a planer. Suggestions? Thanks!

    Are you planing to just to put a good surface on the boards? 

    Or to change the thickness,  and how much?

    How much do you have to plane quantity wise?

    Type of wood?

Seth

Offline sac3848

  • Posts: 39
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2017, 11:09 AM »
Lunch box planer?

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1728
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2017, 04:30 PM »
If you are planning to do a lot of surfacing in the future (and given your plans I would think you might) then the longer term solution is a planer; maybe a Dewalt 735 or something similar to that which is still about $500 - $600 depending on where and when you buy it. However, if you do buy one, be aware that you either must do the planing outside or find some effective method of dust collection. That is another expense if you don't already have a good, efficient dust collector. The amount of chips and shavings produced is huge.

Hand planing a large amount of wood is a big job unless that is something you have an interest in for skill development and need the exercise.

If you aren't going to do a lot of planing to thickness in the future, then I'd try to find someone who will plane the relatively small amount you will need for the project and decide later about the planer. Lumber companies who do custom millwork will plane. Some locally owned lumber companies who just sell hardwood will plane. Local hardwood sellers will definitely both plane, and sometimes, sand. If you have a local or regional woodworking club, you might be able to make contact with someone who will plane for you. Generally, the fees for planing are not that high and, if you aren't ready to buy the planer and accompanying dust collection, are probably your best option for a single project that you want immediate results on.
Randy

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1116
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2017, 04:38 PM »
I've done long pieces with router sled. Time consuming, yet quicker and more accurate then hand plane.

Offline woodvkk

  • Posts: 84
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2017, 11:17 PM »
If you are planning to do a lot of surfacing in the future (and given your plans I would think you might) then the longer term solution is a planer; maybe a Dewalt 735 or something similar to that which is still about $500 - $600 depending on where and when you buy it. However, if you do buy one, be aware that you either must do the planing outside or find some effective method of dust collection. That is another expense if you don't already have a good, efficient dust collector. The amount of chips and shavings produced is huge.

Hand planing a large amount of wood is a big job unless that is something you have an interest in for skill development and need the exercise.

If you aren't going to do a lot of planing to thickness in the future, then I'd try to find someone who will plane the relatively small amount you will need for the project and decide later about the planer. Lumber companies who do custom millwork will plane. Some locally owned lumber companies who just sell hardwood will plane. Local hardwood sellers will definitely both plane, and sometimes, sand. If you have a local or regional woodworking club, you might be able to make contact with someone who will plane for you. Generally, the fees for planing are not that high and, if you aren't ready to buy the planer and accompanying dust collection, are probably your best option for a single project that you want immediate results on.

The dewalts show up on Craigslist often. I scored a Dewalt 735 with the wheeled stand and extra blades for 400. You can joint with a planer too but afaik you can't plane with a jointer. I have yet to do jointing but I've seen videos. I highly recommend the 735.

Offline GravyBones

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Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2017, 01:01 AM »
I got a Grizzly 15" planner that is a beast. You gotta dial them in then they are stable and true no matter what you feed it. About $1000 though.
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Offline escan

  • Posts: 22
Re: Planer? or no?
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2017, 10:02 AM »
Lumber quality at large stores has taken a dip in recent years and unless you have a local mill/distributor you'll be tasked with surfacing regionally imported lumber more often than not.