Author Topic: Sheet good handling  (Read 3609 times)

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Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 568
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2018, 11:25 PM »
You are insecure and went berserk on the plywood? or you just want to be busy for the long weekend  [eek]
Mario

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5734
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2018, 11:34 PM »
You are insecure and went berserk on the plywood? or you just want to be busy for the long weekend  [eek]

I order 3 or 4 bunks at a time.  Normally last 3 to 4 weeks.

Solids (hard and soft maple) I buy in increments of 500 board feet, unless it happens to be a one off. Then I order what I need plus 15%.

Blum drawer slides I order by the pallet. The last two house used just under 300 drawer slide pairs. House we’re doing now will use 278 pairs of drawer slides.

Hinges and back plates 1000 at a time, edge banding by the mile (speaking of which I need to order 10 more rolls).

Finish is ordered 25-50 gallons per order.

Tom

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 568
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2018, 11:40 PM »
wow  [scared]
Mario

Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1402
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #33 on: August 31, 2018, 08:49 AM »
Impressive 

Offline awil66

  • Posts: 146
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2018, 09:07 PM »
Was that a mic drop by Tom!?!?i think it was !

Offline IndyMike

  • Posts: 112
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #35 on: September 01, 2018, 01:33 PM »
I had a dream that I was handling sheet goods - and that I had some cool multi-use system that not only handled sheet goods but helped me with like 8 other things........ I think it was too good to be true [i.e. I don't think it was physically actually possible]...

When you start dreaming about plywood :P.
Mike

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 348
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #36 on: November 16, 2018, 07:58 PM »
My shop is too small to run full sheets through the table saw (14x24).  I like the track saw better anyway.  I haul the wood home in a small trailer which has short wooden sides.  Sometimes I just get a sheet on top of the sides and cut it there with the tracksaw.  Usually I tip it out of the trailer and carry it under my arm, clamped to my side, to the shop garage.  I put a 1 inch thick piece of foam on top of the outfeed/assembly table (3'x7') and lift the sheet on top.  The foam slides some but the table has locking casters and is loaded down with tools so it does not move.  I have to shift the foam a bit once the plywood is up but it works.  I'm 63 but can still handle full sheets of 3/4 OK, but I'm doing this as a hobby so a couple sheets in a weekend is about as much as I typically cut up. 

Slickest setup I've seen was a wooden lattice of 1x3s or 1x4s with folding legs so it can be setup as a cut table.  The guy who used it had health issues where he couldn't manage the sheets but he could slide them off his pickup onto the cut table.  From there, he finish cut with a track saw.  He never had to lift a whole sheet.  If it gets to where I need it, I might do this.  But so far, one lift onto the table is OK.  Carrying it 20 feet or so from the trailer to the shop garage isn't a problem.  I can back the trailer into the shop garage but usually I'd rather carry the plywood (I also have to pivot it 90 degrees while backing it and I'm not great at it). 

Offline BarneyD

  • Posts: 49
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #37 on: November 16, 2018, 08:36 PM »
The older I get, the less I find myself willing to lift. I have a cutting table I made of 3/4" ply on folding legs (so I can easily store it). And my shop is fairly small so I prefer to do this outdoors where I have plenty of room.  I just slide the sheets out of the truck onto the cutting table and have a go at them with the tracksaw.  Sliding is way easier than lifting.

 
Barney