Author Topic: Hybrid workbench build  (Read 9185 times)

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Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Hybrid workbench build
« on: December 13, 2016, 02:55 PM »
So after only a little more than a year of service, I decided to ditch my previous workbench, which I had constructed basically as a larger version of an MFT:

255447-0

and construct a heftier one in its place.  The main reason for the reconfiguration has been my growing use of hand tools, which require more in-line clamping options and a sturdier base than my current setup.  I didn't do that much designing or research in advance, but the end result was more or less dictated by the following parameters:

1) I wanted it to be serviceable for both hand and power tool work, with a nearly complete grid of holes so that I could carry over the full range of clamping options from my MFT style bench (e.g., it would be kind of hard to clamp down from underneath the MFS on a solid top workbench with just one line of dog holes)

2) My shop being what it is -- half of a two car garage -- the bench has to butt up against the center wall, leaving space on the left for the drill press, and on the right for the table saw to roll in to clear the garage door, but also have space underneath for storage

3) Whatever the design, I wanted to integrate both the Glide/Crisscross leg vise and the wagon style tail vise made from Benchcrafted -- the latter one being particularly useful since it did not require any additional space to the right of the bench.

So what I settled on was an 1 1/2" thick top, made from hard maple in butcher block style so I could expose the more durable edge grain.  This is thick enough for pretty serious hand tool work, but thin enough to easily accommodate underneath clamping.  As far as the base goes, I neither needed nor could spare the space for something monstrous -- just a 2x along the wall for the back of the bench to rest on, and then two solid legs in the front.

I got most of the material in late October, a mix of 8/4 and 6/4 maple from Rosenzweig lumber in the Bronx:

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and have been working bit by bit since then to bring it to completion, and finally finished up this past weekend.

I cut the 6/4 maple into 1 3/4" strips with the TSC55 -- since I was doing a lot of the work at night,  I couldn't use the table saw out in the driveway, and so went instead with the track saw, using the LR32 edge guides to make repeatable thin strips

255453-3

I decided to form the top out of three smaller sections so that I could pass each one through my thickness planer first and minimize the flattening I would have to do once the full top was assembled.   To make the most of the material, I staggered full 72" lines with 2 36" pieces from the offcuts of the 9 or 10 ft. boards.  Predictably, some of the strips bowed once they had been cut off from the main board, so I decided to use 5mm dominoes to ensure alignment (and also stagger the bowing in consecutive pieces so that it would cancel out), and make it so that I wouldn't have to send it through the planer too many times to get a flat face.  The bow clamps also helped to keep it relatively straight for the glue up:

255455-4

The length turned out to be really straight:

255461-5

But despite the bow clamps the depth was not quite an even plane (I probably should have added another one in the middle of the panel), so I hit one side with the jointer plane:

255457-6 

And then sent it through the planer to finish the other side:

255459-7

With three of them completed, I prepped them for edge joining with 10mm dominoes.  Unfortunately, I discovered that the 2700 holey rail I was using to joint the edges is bowed -- I don't know if it's been that way from the beginning, since I normally use the 3000mm for long rip cuts.  The resulting gap when the boards are laid out edge to edge is not huge, but it's a little more than I would use for a spring joint:

255463-8

But that's why God made jointer planes:

255465-9

255467-10

Added in the dominoes, and glued up the entire top, this time with a bow clamp in the middle.

255469-11  255471-12   

Because I was careful in the preliminary steps, the top didn't require all that much flattening after the glue up -- jointer plane was again sufficient to level everything out.  Trimmed the entire top to length, and began thinking about the cap, laminate and leg dimensions to accommodate the vises:

255473-13

To be continued in another post...
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 91
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2016, 03:22 PM »
I look forward to the rest of this.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2016, 07:12 PM »
As I did with the previous workbench, I used the OF1400 with the Woodrave template produced by FOG member @anthonyz to bore the holes in the top, which utilizes standard pegboard as a template to establish the grid pattern:

255477-0

I probably should have gotten another brand of 20mm bit for the job, but I just went ahead and used the CMT bit I had already employed with the MDF on the previous bench, despite it having burnt the heck out of the material from the first plunge to the last (router speed and rate of plunge made no difference).  Same side effects this time around -- by the time I was finished a thick, ugly resin coated the inside of the dust chute and the CT exhaust smelled (and a week later stills smells) like a campfire:

255479-1

Other than being crispy on the inside, the holes were fine -- I made sure to leave a zone untouched at the right end of the bench for the undermounting of the tail vise.  The only issue with the Woodrave template is that it raised the router too high to do a through plunge in that thickness, so I had to finish them off with a drill and forstner bit.  Since I don't need CNC level precision on these holes, the imprecision introduced by hand drilling the remainder is fine, though if I didn't already have the template, I might have opted for the UJK system designed by @Peter Parfitt instead.

255481-2

The Benchcrafted Tail vise is usually installed on a much thicker, 4" bench, which then requires you to mortise out the underside to fit the mechanism.  So installing it on a thinner bench is actually a bit easier -- you just have to make the front laminate and endcap the appropriate thickness then shim out the underside of the top.

For the channel in which the dog block actually moves, I simply cut out a rectangle from the top with the tracksaw:

255483-3

And then finished it up with a handsaw and chisels to get a square corner:

255485-4

Once you go through the whole installation process on the vises (both the tail and the leg vises), you realize it's not that hard, but the directions from Benchcrafted are a little obscure.  Part of the issue is that they don't discuss installing it on a thinner top -- all they provide is a template at the end for drilling the holes in the endcap on a thinner bench.  I was almost going to follow those directions, which have a 3" thick front laminate and endcap, with a further 3/4 shim for mounting the vise rails, when I realized I could just cut out the middleman and make those pieces at 3 3/4".  Why Benchcrafted wouldn't just say clearly that 3 3/4 is the target width I'm not sure.  In any case, I laminated two pieces of 6/4 maple to make the endcap, through which I drilled the holes as indicated on the template.  I cut a piece of 8/4 to the same width for the laminate, then dominoed everything up in preparation for installation:

255487-5

I used heavy screws for the installation of the front laminate and end cap rather than glue, just in case I ever wanted to change the configuration.  I also left the end cap slightly proud so that it could be planed flush once installed

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Only thing left was the shim for the other vise rail.  This is the exact operatation handplanes were made for, as I could rip it proud then plane it to the exact height sitting standing next to the laminate, and so the vise mechanism would be perfectly coplanar:

255493-8

255495-9

I held off attaching the wheel until I got the legs and leg vise in place, about which more in the next post

255497-10
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2016, 07:58 PM »
For the legs I glues up laminated two pieces of 8/4 -- the front piece being the same thickness as the front laminate on the top, so there would be an even surface all the way down.  The method of securing the legs to the top is a little jury-rigged.  It involved, first, offsetting the laminated pieces on the leg (at the time of glue up) such that they were the exact mirror of the thickness difference between the bottom of the benchtop and the bottom of the front laminate; second, putting two unglued 10mm dominoes in the board that connected to the laminate (note to self -- use narrow setting on mortises next time):

255499-0

third, tapping the wood in a hole for a 1/4-20 machine screw drilled from the top of the bench into the leg:

255501-1

and fourth (though done at the tail end), anchoring the leg with brackets secured to the concrete with lag screws and shields:

255503-2

It ain't no Roubo-style dovetailed through mortise into the top, but it works well enough for my purposes.

In the meantime, I had laminated a piece of 8/4 and 5/4 to make the leg chop

255505-3

The crisscross bracket requires a 1 3/4w x 19"h x 1 7/16"d mortise on both the chop and the leg.  Guido Henn has a video up where he does it just with a router and an edge guide, but for the sake of repeatability I went with the MFS:

255507-4

After doing the mortise I coffin shaped the chop and did the required holes for the flange, which also call for tapping the wood for added security:

255509-5

I've contemplated downsizing my drill press to a benchtop model to make more floorspace for other machines, but I'm happy I haven't done it yet, because doing the through hole in the chop for the crisscross pivot rod required me to lower the drill press table over two feet below the quill:

255511-6

For added stability, they give you an acetyl bushing that you mortise flush into the leg so that the vise screw stays centered.  Only problem was that I didn't have a 2 3/4 forstner bit on hand, and that's not something you can just pick up at the home center, so rather than wait for an internet order, I decided to two step-it by drilling the circumference of the mortise with a hole saw:

255513-7

And then take out the remainder with the router plane

255515-8

255517-9

The Benchcrafted installation instructions get really crazy when you get to the part about centering the chop and the leg.  I've never been that good about turning words into images in my head, and usually require a picture to truly understand what's being called for, so the paragraphs of text absent any pictures and the jumping from one part of the manual to the other at this point in the installation instructions became a bit maddening.  I finally decided to forego all the complicated techniques and just center the rest of the leg vise hardware by eye.  It worked out fine, and it passed the test whereby you can spin the wheel when fully open and have that be enough to close the vise.

I did a little shaping with the plane on the top of the chop to get it coplanar with the bench and add a gentle curve, and glued in the suede included in the vise kit:

255519-10

Ready now for the finishing touches and test run
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline mwildt

  • Posts: 357
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2016, 08:14 PM »
Looks nice. I wouldn't call the dog holes burned they're Ebonized, right ?

Seriously, too bad you didn't get a fresh bit after the first cut. That router picture surely shows its been hotter than hot.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2016, 08:25 PM »
A few test runs confirmed that both vises work brilliantly, especially with narrow/thin stock, which was really difficult to do on my previous bench:

255521-0

255523-1

The only complaint I have is on the end vise -- when you tighten it down to clamp material, the dog raises tips ever so slightly above the plane of the workbench.  I don't think there's any remedying this, as it appears to be a function of the tracks, which have a little bit of play built into them for smooth travel, such that pressure causes the dog plate to tip up and back in the track (exactly like what happens when you use too much pressure with in-line clamps).  It doesn't affect any of the work I'm doing at the moment, and maybe not ever, so I won't worry about it.

Some very minor modifications of my clamping setup are required on this thicker bench.  I've switched out the short bolts on all of my clamping knobs (the ones from the Clamping elements) with M8x40mm hex bolts.  I've also had to grind off the metal nub at the top of the post on the quick and screw clamps so that I can remove the clamping pad -- the bar gets inserted from the underside of the table and then the pad is reattached to engage the clamp.

I haven't yet had any accidents with the metal dogs and plane stops I've used up to this point, but rather than press my luck I decided to turn some 20mm stock for a few wooden dogs:

255525-2

They actually work better, since I can square one of the sides to have more of a contact surface with the workpiece (like the ones from the new Festool clamping kit):

255527-3

255529-4

Bench is all done -- just waiting for warmer weather to apply a finish.  Final dimensions are 73" x 30 1/2" x 35 1/2".  That's 1 1/2" taller than my previous bench, as I found I was hunching over too much doing hand plane work.  The only structural question I have is about the long term stability of the top with only two legs and the 2x material running the full length of the back.  In particular, I'm wondering if over time there may be some bowing on the short, 30.5" side.  I was thinking I could always add an endcap on the left hand side to add some extra rigidity.

255533-5

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Now I have to think about redoing the tool cabinet overhanging the bench to accommodate more hand tools, and redesigning under the bench storage to make more efficient use of the space for small accessories:
« Last Edit: December 13, 2016, 08:53 PM by Edward A Reno III »
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3529
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2016, 04:08 AM »
you're doing a great job.

One thing I would have added is holes in the leg opposite your vice to support longer boards for hand planing.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2016, 09:08 AM »
Thanks.  Yeah, I'm probably going to put that in.  I'm experimenting right now with various options, one of which is simply clamping a board rest to the front laminate or opposite leg whenever I'm planing a long board.  The leg vise gives me a lot of room to work with -- I have about 10" capacity between the leg vise screw and the top of the chop, so I can set boards really deep if need be. 

you're doing a great job.

One thing I would have added is holes in the leg opposite your vice to support longer boards for hand planing.

Tinker
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline RENO

  • Posts: 45
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2016, 04:59 PM »
that is a great looking workbench !
OF900-TF900-PS2-TS55-DR7,2-DX93E-RO90DX-CS50-KAPEX120-basis1&expansion-and some more non Festool stuf to work my way in woodworking

Offline magellan

  • Posts: 141
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2016, 06:54 AM »
Nice looking bench you built,

I can appreciate your pain at times with the Benchcraft instructions.  I've just finished building a true Roubo bench and I also thought the instructions were a bit confusing.  It's sort of like they kept updating their print as they upgraded their vise hardware but kept the older instructions in there too.   You have to disregard pages of the instructions if it's a retro or a new build, but you end up reading all of it and I think that is part of the confusion. 

As for the hole for the Acetyl bearing.  What I did was to use a 2 7/8" hole saw in a piece of 1/4" hard board to use as a guide template for the router with a collar.  Worked perfectly and left me a nice 2 5/8" recess for the 2.5" bearing.  The hard part about the placing the bearing is how they explain about letting it find it's center.  Holding the screw to the back of the leg and lining up the chop.  I questioned my thinking if I was doing correctly.  Once you are able to interpret the procedure it all works. 

Thank you for the nice post on your build.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2016, 06:14 PM »
Just an update and FYI -- we had some crazy weather this past Friday here in NYC, where it went from well below freezing the night before into the upper 50s during the day -- on top of really high humidity.  Good thing I was home -- I poked my head in the workshop and noticed all the metal surfaces -- particularly the cast iron and chromed/stainless ones -- had developed a layer of condensation. 

I applied some additional oiling to all my hand plans and cast iron tools, but I didn't even think to do the benchrafted wheels.  So today I saw that they had both developed a thin layer of rust on them.   Nothing that couldn't be wiped off with some scotchbrite and oil, but I'm sort of wishing now I had gotten the more expensive, finished M style rather than the C version.  I'll just have to be vigilant in the future about adding the wheels and vise components to my oiling and rust prevention regimen.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2017, 09:13 AM »
The weather was so freakishly warm yesterday in nyc that I was able to get two applications of danish oil onto the bench.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2017, 09:16 AM by Edward A Reno III »
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Mismarked

  • Posts: 120
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2017, 11:41 AM »
Edward, I really like the bench you built in terms of size, functionality, thinner top with the thicker laminate on the front and ends, and the leg installation.
   I am wondering if, after using it for several months now, you had any additional thoughts on the wagon/tail vise, and specifically, that vs. an end screw vise or the traditional tail vise. 
   All I have now is an MFT and a Sjoberg portable moxon and want to build some sort of proper bench.  But I can't seem to wrap my head around how I would use the wagon vise.  You do seem to be much more prone than I would be at this stage of woodworking to reach for a hand plane over a power tool.  Maybe that is part of it.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2017, 01:41 PM »
@Mismarked I'm very happy still with the choice of the wagon vise.  The original motive behind it was conservation of space -- I've reached a point where everything in my shop (half of a 2 car garage) has to be as space saving as possible, and a traditional end vise would jut out into the space into which my table saw gets rolled when not in use.  Along with that, when I'm planing, I can start my stroke standing near the end of the bench, as opposed to behind it.  It's more than just a clamp for planing, however, and I use it all the time now when sanding or dominoing, since coupled with the plane stops, it provides very effective low profile clamping. 

Also great for temporarily securing things to the bench, like a sharpening station or bench hook, and in such a way that it's aligned closer to the center of the bench than you could get with a traditional end vise. 

I haven't done any hand dovetailing, but the wagon vice is perfect for that since you can drop the board through the bench.  I use it that way any time I'm cutting into the end grain.  Seeing how useful it has become in this application I realize now I should have made the width of the channel in which the dog block travels 2" instead of 1.75", that way I could accommodate undressed 8/4 material.

I think the installation of the vise is actually easier on a thinner top.  You only have to worry about shimming the rails, and don't have to get into routing out a cavity for it to fit.  One thing to make sure of is to build in as much travel for the dog block as the vise screw will allow.   

Edward, I really like the bench you built in terms of size, functionality, thinner top with the thicker laminate on the front and ends, and the leg installation.
   I am wondering if, after using it for several months now, you had any additional thoughts on the wagon/tail vise, and specifically, that vs. an end screw vise or the traditional tail vise. 
   All I have now is an MFT and a Sjoberg portable moxon and want to build some sort of proper bench.  But I can't seem to wrap my head around how I would use the wagon vise.  You do seem to be much more prone than I would be at this stage of woodworking to reach for a hand plane over a power tool.  Maybe that is part of it.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline fotojoe

  • Posts: 5
    • Really Right Stuff
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2017, 02:41 AM »
Edward,
Thanks for posting your bench images and play by play descriptions. Like you, I want to make a non-mobile, hybrid table to stay in the shop. I see your top is 1 1/2 inch thick which would not allow inserting the Festool L-shaped clamps (FSZ-120/300 or FS-HZ 160).
1. Am I wrong in that assumption?
2. If you cannot use the Festool clamps, do you wish you could or are you happy with the thicker top?
3. How do you find you use the dog holes most?
4. Do you ever cut with your track saw on top of the table? If so, I assume you lay sacrifice panel on top of your beautiful bench first, right?
Thanks again and nice work. Joe
Have: TS 75 EQ, RO 150 FEQ, CXS Set, CT 36E
Want: DF 700 EQ, MFT/3, more Systainers

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 907
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2017, 06:44 AM »
@ear3
Joe, you can add that tag to notify someone that you've mentioned them in a thread. The forum generates an email.
-Raj

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3287
Re: Hybrid workbench build
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2017, 07:38 AM »
@joe@reallyrightstuff.com

You're right that with the clamp assembled, it can't be inserted into the holes.  But there's an easy fix for that, which involves grinding off the metal nib at the end of the bar that keeps the end from sliding off.  With the clamp in two pieces, you insert the bar from the bottom of the hole then reattach the head on top.

I actually don't employ the Festool clamps nearly as often as I used to, however, as I've found other clamping options more useful for the work I do.

For inline clamping, the benchcrafted wagon vise I added to the bench is brilliant.  It's all I need now for securing boards for sanding, using some low profile maple dogs I made.  And whenever I have to rip a board with the tracksaw, I secure the ends with the vise with the edge hanging over the bench and then cut.  For crosscutting within the limits of the bench's depth, I will lay down a piece of plywood or even some 2x6 blocks to protect the top -- otherwise I don't cut into the bench with a saw.  I suppose you could get creative, though, and mill a sacrificial strip into a dado in the bench, as some do with their MFT.  I still do precision and/or batched crosscutting on the MFT, though.

I am also glad that I added holes over the entire top, which get used all the time for the rest of my clamping/stopping needs.  Whenever I have to domino a board, I will secure it with large Kreg automaxx clamps mounted to Seneca clamp dogs (https://www.senecawoodworking.com/blogs/news/8385791-introducing-the-seneca-woodworking-mft-clamp-dog).  I much prefer these clamps to other options, such as the Festool rapid clamps, as they allow quick secure and release for repeat work.  For hand planing, I have the veritas low profile planing stops, which I often use in combination with the wagon vise or the Festool clamping elements to keep the board secure (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=69837&cat=1,41637).  Just note that for thicker benches, you have to change out the stock M8 bolt in the clamp knobs for a longer one so that it reaches the post. 

Edward,
Thanks for posting your bench images and play by play descriptions. Like you, I want to make a non-mobile, hybrid table to stay in the shop. I see your top is 1 1/2 inch thick which would not allow inserting the Festool L-shaped clamps (FSZ-120/300 or FS-HZ 160).
1. Am I wrong in that assumption?
2. If you cannot use the Festool clamps, do you wish you could or are you happy with the thicker top?
3. How do you find you use the dog holes most?
4. Do you ever cut with your track saw on top of the table? If so, I assume you lay sacrifice panel on top of your beautiful bench first, right?
Thanks again and nice work. Joe
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 07:44 AM by ear3 »
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