Author Topic: Sheet good handling  (Read 2671 times)

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Offline dmccririe

  • Posts: 33
Sheet good handling
« on: August 20, 2018, 02:09 PM »
As I get older and weaker and my back is less tolerant, I'm looking for ways to handle sheet goods without the clean and jerk.  I almost exclusively work alone, and I see a variety of carts and racks that allow you to go from vertical to horizontal to load the sheet goods onto sawhorses or table saws or whatever.   What are your experiences, pros and cons, good and bad, etc. I really don't want to build one because I have too many other projects pending.  Thanks in Advance!

Dale

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2018, 03:02 PM »

Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2018, 03:05 PM »
The first question is how you are getting sheet goods home.  If you are using a truck, slide them right off the bed onto saw horses to break down into more manageable sizes.  If being delivered most likely they are taking off with forklift, I would have him place on saw horses.  There was also a panel lift that bolted to table saw and then could be swung up. 
Bryan

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Offline hdv

  • Posts: 14
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2018, 04:12 PM »
I think Wooden Skye might hint at this Gorilla's Leg Up (see https://www.gorillagripper.com/leg-up.html).

Another option (albeit Festool-like expensive!) is the FAT 300 S height adjustable working table from Felder (see https://www.felder-group.com/fg-en/products/workshop-equipment/work-table-fat-300-s.html) in combination with their panel tilting device (see the accessories section on the same page). I have had my eye on them for a while now. Need to save up first though... ;-)



Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 294
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2018, 04:13 PM »
I have had the Crazy Horse since mid February.  Love it.

Search for a post I started late last year on this website

Online waho6o9

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2018, 09:07 PM »
284011-0

Dimension the sheet goods right off the truck as mentioned above.

I use a WalkoIV on Stanley horses and it works well, using a TS75 and a several clamps I can cut 3 sheets at a time.

Festool rocks.

Offline dmccririe

  • Posts: 33
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2018, 10:41 AM »
@Wooden Skye:  I transport the sheet goods home in my pickup but I have help loading them in and out.  When I'm in my shop, I don't typically have help and I also am cramped for space.  I have seen the crazy horse and ultimately, that may be the way I go but it will not work as well given the configuration of my shop.     Again, just looking for others ideas, experiences so I can explore what will work best for me.
Dale

Offline tomp

  • Posts: 45
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2018, 11:41 AM »
I have a knock-down grid that I made to sit on top of a pair of sawhorses. The combined height lets me slide a sheet of plywood off the back of my truck onto the grid with minimal handling. Mostly break down the sheets using a Eurekazone UEG first to rip to width and then cross-cut to length on the MFT. If there will be large panels - e.g. base cabinet ends, I use the UEG and then a track with the TRO square to cut final size without lifting anything off the grid.
284128-0
284130-1
284132-2
284126-3

The grid breaks down for storage and, as an added plus, can be used as an assembly table.
284134-4

Online waho6o9

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2018, 11:48 AM »
Good job on an excellent grid tomp!

Offline 3PedalMINI

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2018, 01:41 PM »
im thinking about picking this up https://www.rockler.com/rockler-material-mate-panel-cart-and-shop-stand?sid=V9146?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PL&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIurO805mB3QIVFVYNCh0SMApTEAQYASABEgKz3PD_BwE

Im 29 but still have a hard time dealing with the sheet goods. I just got a powermatic PM2000 saw and was thinking about this same thing. I actually think what im going todo is to get the rockler piece and modify it to use a "knockdown grid" like posted above. Slide them out of my truck and onto that then use the TS55 to break it down into more manageable pieces.
The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten -Benjamin Franklin

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Offline IndyMike

  • Posts: 112
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2018, 01:47 PM »
The CrazyHorse looks awesome.

My biggest issue was taking the plywood from leaning against the wall to up and on top of my saw horses - without knocking the saw horses over.  If the horses were stuck the the floor / more sturdy it wouldn't be an issue.

That said I planned on building a grid like @tomp's and just laying it on the floor rather than on top of saw horses - which will make dropping the plywood onto it much easier.
Mike

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 121
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2018, 08:07 AM »
I've got one of these Bora Portamate carriers -

https://www.amazon.com/Portamate-PM-1800-Carrier-Allows-Person/dp/B01AWI8ILW

The verdict: Meh.

It performs as intended, but at times can be a bit unwieldy when loading. The leg needs to be folded out and if you don't quite get the plywood centered when first loading, the unit can get tippy.  It's also necessary to set the height prior to loading as doing so afterwards is difficult.

Once loaded though, it does make it easy to move sheets around. I've loaded 3/4 ply on it with no weight issues. When I was breaking down sheet goods on foam on my workbench it was quite useful to get it at the right height. Now that I use a lower track saw cutting station on saw horses it's easier to manage the sheets without it.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 590
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2018, 10:57 AM »
I have had no experience with the Bora panel carrier. Did you see the improvement measures suggested by the reviewer J. Kinney (May 21, 2017)?

Offline IndyMike

  • Posts: 112
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2018, 11:00 AM »
I have had no experience with the Bora panel carrier. Did you see the improvement measures suggested by the reviewer J. Kinney (May 21, 2017)?
Have a link?

I'm looking at getting something myself to help me manage 3/4" sheet goods myself.  The GF doesn't mind helping but she's tiny and 3/4" hardwood ply is heavy :).
Mike

Offline ChuckM

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2018, 11:02 AM »

Offline IndyMike

  • Posts: 112
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2018, 11:03 AM »
The Rockler cart looks solid. Unfortunately, my shop won't have room for it, unlike the Bora panel carrier that can lead on a wall.
That's one of my issues too - I'm running out of places to store things.  I'm turning to the ceiling soon.  Pulleys and rope :P.
Mike

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 590
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2018, 11:21 AM »
I have had no experience with the Bora panel carrier. Did you see the improvement measures suggested by the reviewer J. Kinney (May 21, 2017)?
Have a link?

I'm looking at getting something myself to help me manage 3/4" sheet goods myself.  The GF doesn't mind helping but she's tiny and 3/4" hardwood ply is heavy :).

https://www.amazon.com/Portamate-PM-1800-Carrier-Allows-Person/dp/B01AWI8ILW#customerReviews

The first comment with photos, too.

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 121
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2018, 11:54 AM »
Yeah, I came across that review with the user mods to the Bora Portamate just this morning, will have to look into it.

I hope I didn't give the impression of a thumbs down, buy something else. The cart is useful, it's reasonably priced, will easily carry a 3/4" 4x8 sheet of ply and it does store in a compact footprint. Perhaps the mods made by that reviewer will help with some of the issues I've run into.

I'm in my 60s so wielding sheets of ply out of my truck bed isn't as easy as it once was. I think my initial intent was to set the unit up in its horizontal position to attempt sliding the sheet out onto it, which wasn't overly successful.

-Dom

Offline sprior

  • Posts: 379
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2018, 12:03 PM »
Not being a pro I've got a few extra challenges in material handling.  My shop is in my basement accessed via a bulkhead door/steps (at the other end of the house from my driveway), so the first challenge is to get the plywood from the garage to the top of the bulkhead steps.  Next is getting it down the steps and onto my wood rack.  Then when I want to use it get it from the rack to the next room up onto my big work table where I use the TS55 to part it.

So in addition to the products mentioned above, someday when it becomes harder for my wife and I to manage the plywood I'll have to come up with a solution for the bulkhead steps - I've been imagining a track down the side of the steps and a small carriage that rides the track with a winch to raise/lower the carriage.  The plywood might need to go down at an angle to clear the doorway, so possibly a second removable track might be needed.

Online Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3467
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #19 on: August 29, 2018, 12:11 PM »
Not being a pro I've got a few extra challenges in material handling.  My shop is in my basement accessed via a bulkhead door/steps (at the other end of the house from my driveway), so the first challenge is to get the plywood from the garage to the top of the bulkhead steps.  Next is getting it down the steps and onto my wood rack.  Then when I want to use it get it from the rack to the next room up onto my big work table where I use the TS55 to part it.

So in addition to the products mentioned above, someday when it becomes harder for my wife and I to manage the plywood I'll have to come up with a solution for the bulkhead steps - I've been imagining a track down the side of the steps and a small carriage that rides the track with a winch to raise/lower the carriage.  The plywood might need to go down at an angle to clear the doorway, so possibly a second removable track might be needed.

You just need to alter the workflow so it’s “parted”, or at least rough parted, in the garage.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 590
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2018, 12:22 PM »
I could not imagine how challenging it must be to work out of a basement shop. The thought of moving big machinery down the stairs is daunting enough for me (one of my friends managed to get a SawStop PCS into his basement with only one extra helper).

My basement (walk-out) is a place to store my lumber (on a pool table), but in the winter time when it is snow everywhere, I will try to move the lumber via the stairs -- doable with a bit of care. 4 x 8, if any, probably won't work and must go through the basement door. But then, I usually have a full sheet pre-cut into two at the lumber yard or big box store.

Offline sprior

  • Posts: 379
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2018, 12:28 PM »

You just need to alter the workflow so it’s “parted”, or at least rough parted, in the garage.

That's not a good option for me, besides the garage being a nowhere near as nice environment as my workshop I also tend to keep some plywood "in stock", so there's no specific cuts to be made at the time of purchase.

Maybe someday when I retire I'll move and get a shop at ground level, but that's not soon.

Offline sprior

  • Posts: 379
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2018, 12:37 PM »
I could not imagine how challenging it must be to work out of a basement shop. The thought of moving big machinery down the stairs is daunting enough for me (one of my friends managed to get a SawStop PCS into his basement with only one extra helper).

Depends on how determined you are, I've seen pictures of Brideport mills in basements.  I suspect it'll take a Sawzall to get my big work table out of there.  Not being a city dweller I just recently heard that there are people who specialize in  performing surgery on (and then repairing) furniture to get it to fit in elevators for apartment buildings.

Here's a picture of my workshop, most of the Festool stuff is out of frame behind me as are tools like band saw, table saw, jointer which are stored in a corner and get rolled out on demand.  BTW, almost everything is on wheels and a few weeks ago it took me only 90 minutes to clean out this space to the bare walls (everything to the adjoining room) all by myself.

My current project is building a new miter saw station that has systainer storage.  The platform on top is the old one temporarily borrowed, I'm building a new bigger one with drawers under the top deck and a removable extension wing.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 01:01 PM by sprior »

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 121
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #23 on: August 29, 2018, 01:15 PM »
Since I had to make a trip to Lowe's today for plywood and drywall, I figured I'd give the Portamate another go in unloading the sheets off the truck. I only used it for the plywood, which was 1/2",  I carried the sheetrock in by hand.

I set up the Portamate in its horizontal orientation far enough away from the tailgate and slid the ply out onto it. Honestly, it wasn't as bad as I had recalled, but this is 1/2" ply and I normally work with 3/4". Lowering the sheet back down to vertical is easy enough with the lever handle. The  tricky part is trying to push the button to retract the extended leg while keeping the sheet almost upright so it won't tip over. As I'd done in the past, I just left the leg extended and wheeled it the 20' into  my garage.

In the past when I had a lot of 3/4" ply to unload, it was handy to have this. This 1/2" sheet could easily have been hand carried, but I wanted to give it another go as a refresher.

Fortunately I can break down sheet goods in the garage with the TS55. There's no room in the basement shop to store 4x8 sheets nor do I want to carry one down the bulkhead stairs.

And those are the results for today's experiment.  Back to making French cleats.  :)

-Dom

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2018, 01:19 PM »
I have a garage shop with the garage in the back of the house behind a gate with a block wall fence. So what works for me is a cheap harbor fireight movers dolly. Yea I still have to muscle the sheet goods outta the back of the truck but once on the dolly its easy peasy to roll in the shop one or 2 at a time then muscle them on to my MFT. I get these on sale with a coupon for about $8 and they are small and easy to store

https://www.harborfreight.com/18-in-x-12-in-1000-lbs-capacity-hardwood-dolly-63095.html

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 121
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2018, 08:18 PM »
@sprior , nice shop btw. I wish I had that much room in mine,  but it's a vast improvement over working in the garage.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 510
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2018, 10:32 AM »
@sprior , nice shop btw. I wish I had that much room in mine,  but it's a vast improvement over working in the garage.

I second that ^^

Looks like a high ceiling. The only negative thing is the x-carve   [eek] I have a Shapeoko 3  [tongue]
Mario
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Offline sprior

  • Posts: 379
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2018, 11:08 AM »

I second that ^^

Looks like a high ceiling. The only negative thing is the x-carve   [eek] I have a Shapeoko 3  [tongue]

The ceiling height is high, the downside is that it is bare fiberglass which usually isn't much of an issue except like last night when I aimed a compressor blow nozzle up while I was emptying the tank.  It'd be nice to cover it, but I've got a LOT of wiring (mostly networking, video), ducts, and plumbing that would be in the way.  A friend once suggested stapling up Tyvek house wrap.

When I got my X-Carve the Shapeoko 3 XXL wasn't out yet, but knowing what I do now I'd go in that direction.  My X-Carve works really well, but I had to spend too much time/money upgrading it for stiffness and other stuff.  Having now seen the difference between the X-Carve and Shapoko extrusion beefiness it's clear who's better int hat regard.  And my dissatisfaction with Easel's cloud based approach has only grown over time, and them pushing the Easel Pro subscription just makes me mad.  I actually use Fusion 360 for my design work and have just been using Easel as my g-code sender out of laziness.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 11:32 AM by sprior »

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 121
Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2018, 10:37 PM »


I was prowling thru YouTube videos this evening and came across a Stumpy Nubs review of the Bora Portamate, which may help in a decision re: what to purchase.

And it seems that my method of not retracting the leg during transport is what they did when they used their unit. 

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: Sheet good handling
« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2018, 11:23 PM »
 [big grin]

Tom