Author Topic: Shop Storage  (Read 6388 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Shop Storage
« on: November 26, 2011, 04:39 PM »
One of my favorite projects to plink away on on saturdays is my shop. It is a project that has been going on for just over 2 years now. We dismantled an old timberframe barn on our property and built a new facility, reusing much of the salvaged material where ever possible.

One great use of the scraps has been in building shelving and workstations. We designed shelving and cubbies, as well as benches that double as workstations on casters for shop projects, including the 4x8 assembly table shown.

44367-0

Today's component of the project was to build the last of the wall mounted cubbie units and finish. All of these units are built with scrap plywood and barnboard faceframes.

44369-1

We use our shop to build our shop (not done yet), as well as for prefinishing of materials for projects on which my company works. If anyone has suggestions or questions, I welcome that sort of thing. Also, if you have shop storage issues of your own and would be interested in seeing more close up detail of how we have compartmentalized tools, abrasives and finishing inventory, please do not hesitate to ask.

In case you are wondering, we do very little spraying in this facility. We have a separate spray shop, which I am also happy to share ideas about.

Offline andvari

  • Posts: 423
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2011, 05:19 PM »
I'm on my second iteration of my shop. It's in a 2 car garage and this time around the main design principle was to put EVERYTHING on wheels. It's great because it lets easily me reconfigure the shop for whatever project I'm working on, and to easily overflow into the outdoors when the weather is nice.

TS55, Domino 500, Domino Assortment, OF1400, CT36+Boom Arm, T12+3, FS3000, Parallel Guides, RO 90, ETS 150/3, Domino XL, Domiplate, LS130, RTS Guide Stop, CMS-GE, Carvex 420

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2011, 05:33 PM »
I'm on my second iteration of my shop. It's in a 2 car garage and this time around the main design principle was to put EVERYTHING on wheels. It's great because it lets easily me reconfigure the shop for whatever project I'm working on, and to easily overflow into the outdoors when the weather is nice.



Andvari

This is our second generation shop as well. Our first was a fraction of the size. We didnt caster-ize the benches, and we were just stuck with what we had for about 9 years.

The casters do so much for efficiency and, in our case, labor savings. We can wheel the big table to the overhead door and load a couple thousand feet of stock onto it, straight off a truck and push it into place to feed workstations. Its like pushing a Volkswagen, takes at least 2 guys, but they are 2 guys that didnt have to carry the boards in and stack them. I am usually one of the two.

The shop space pictured is basically a 2 car garage footprint, just really tall.

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7652
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2011, 06:07 PM »
Where did you get the Festool mat? Is a non slip rubber one?

Kev.

Offline Sometimewoodworker

  • Posts: 746
    • Jerome's  Other work
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2011, 06:32 PM »
I'd be interested in your spray shop. I'll be needing to put something together when I build our house.
Jerome
TS55, OF1400, Elu MOF96, Rotex150, DTS400, ETS150/3 Domino, MFK700, CXS, HL 850, Trend T11, Makita LS1212, Original Mini CV06 Cyclone, Workshop supplies drum sander, & WoodRat. Don't have don't want list: MFT
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nui-jerome/

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2011, 06:35 PM »
Where did you get the Festool mat? Is a non slip rubber one?

Kev.

Kev

I so lucked out, happened to have a meeting set up with my local rep the day after he had set up a dealer about two hours away. Remarkably, the dealer didnt want the mat! Yes, its pretty cushy and grippy. Too nice to put at the door and trash it. We use it to stand on for bench work.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 06:45 PM by Scott B. »

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2011, 06:44 PM »
I'd be interested in your spray shop. I'll be needing to put something together when I build our house.

Jerome

I'll gather up some pictures and do that as a separate thread topic. Meanwhile, there is a bunch of video on your  YT channel that shows it in use during some of the sprayer testing we have done.

The biggest tip, for your planning purposes, is that its best if at all possible to have your spray space be a completely separate structure from your house.

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2011, 07:03 PM »
Here's a shot of the assembly paying for itself, and a couple of my employees appreciating that.

44377-0

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7652
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2011, 07:10 PM »
Here's a shot of the assembly paying for itself, and a couple of my employees appreciating that.

(Attachment Link)

Assembly  [eek] [eek] [eek]

I think you should have put a tow bar on that puppy!

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 07:34 PM »
Here's a shot of the assembly paying for itself, and a couple of my employees appreciating that.

(Attachment Link)

Assembly  [eek] [eek] [eek]

I think you should have put a tow bar on that puppy!

Haha...assembly is the easiest part of its job.  [embarassed]

Offline fritter63

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 1396
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2011, 07:43 PM »
Everytime I get my shop set up finished, we end up moving. I'm now on my fourth one. I am SO tired of it.

This is one of the main reasons I've embraced Festool and the Systainer approach. I've also moved most of my other tools to Systainers as well. This way, if everything is on wheels, I can move easier next time. Also better for cleaning out all those spider webs in back... [eek]

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2011, 07:48 PM »
Everytime I get my shop set up finished, we end up moving. I'm now on my fourth one. I am SO tired of it.

This is one of the main reasons I've embraced Festool and the Systainer approach. I've also moved most of my other tools to Systainers as well. This way, if everything is on wheels, I can move easier next time. Also better for cleaning out all those spider webs in back... [eek]

Fritter

There is definitely something to be said for systematizing everything.

My challenge is that I outfit a crew, largely in the field. So, its a battle of inventorying enough of everything for 6 guys, and making sure everything is where it needs to be. The pictures in this thread, much of our gear is on jobs. When everything comes in at the same time, its overwhelming.

I've pretty much accepted the reality that moving is not an option. I feel for you on all the moving.

Offline Sometimewoodworker

  • Posts: 746
    • Jerome's  Other work
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2011, 10:59 PM »
I'd be interested in your spray shop. I'll be needing to put something together when I build our house.

Jerome

I'll gather up some pictures and do that as a separate thread topic. Meanwhile, there is a bunch of video on your  YT channel that shows it in use during some of the sprayer testing we have done.

The biggest tip, for your planning purposes, is that its best if at all possible to have your spray space be a completely separate structure from your house.

With the spray space I am not doing this as a business but as a retirement occupation.

I can think of a few reasons to have it separate from the house but would like to know your ideas on the subject.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 11:09 PM by JeromeM »
Jerome
TS55, OF1400, Elu MOF96, Rotex150, DTS400, ETS150/3 Domino, MFK700, CXS, HL 850, Trend T11, Makita LS1212, Original Mini CV06 Cyclone, Workshop supplies drum sander, & WoodRat. Don't have don't want list: MFT
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nui-jerome/

Offline Scott Burt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 1995
  • painter/writer/educator
    • Prep to Finish
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2011, 07:35 AM »
I'd be interested in your spray shop. I'll be needing to put something together when I build our house.

Jerome

I'll gather up some pictures and do that as a separate thread topic. Meanwhile, there is a bunch of video on your  YT channel that shows it in use during some of the sprayer testing we have done.

The biggest tip, for your planning purposes, is that its best if at all possible to have your spray space be a completely separate structure from your house.

With the spray space I am not doing this as a business but as a retirement occupation.

I can think of a few reasons to have it separate from the house but would like to know your ideas on the subject.

Jerome

I think its a great retirement occupation. So, I gather that you will be finishing your own woodworking projects? What types of pieces do you make the most? And what are you into for finishes?

Our spray shop is set up and built around what we do most, and I think thats the best way to approach it. Our pursuits tend to be very large scale, so they require alot of shop space.

A situation like yours sounds really cool. I love the idea of seeing how small and efficient you can make a spray shop, instead of having it be 6 times as big as your house, like mine.

The fundamental reason that I believe it should not be connected to your house in any way is for health reasons. It can be done, in a basement or garage. I would sooner put up a 12x12 outbuilding if possible.

The biggest things that a spray shop needs are:

-flow...how stuff goes in and out of it
-filtered air exchange
-ability to heat and cool quickly
-a dust free zone

There are all sorts of tips and tricks within that framework, that are largely driven by product.

Let me round up some pictures and such, and get a thread going on the topic.

Offline Sometimewoodworker

  • Posts: 746
    • Jerome's  Other work
Re: Shop Storage
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2011, 09:12 AM »
Jerome

I think its a great retirement occupation. So, I gather that you will be finishing your own woodworking projects? What types of pieces do you make the most? And what are you into for finishes?

Mostly I'm making furniture for us and our house. As for finishes I think they are oil based polly (the I think is because the information is in Thai) shellac, water based poly, and latex. so pretty much everything.

At the moment most of my output is workshop furniture plus a few tables and a bed or two

some of the items are here. http://meekings.selfip.com/nui/Groups-of-photos/Wood_work_etc/Wood_work_etc.html
Our spray shop is set up and built around what we do most, and I think thats the best way to approach it. Our pursuits tend to be very large scale, so they require alot of shop space.

A situation like yours sounds really cool. I love the idea of seeing how small and efficient you can make a spray shop, instead of having it be 6 times as big as your house, like mine.

The fundamental reason that I believe it should not be connected to your house in any way is for health reasons. It can be done, in a basement or garage. I would sooner put up a 12x12 outbuilding if possible.

The biggest things that a spray shop needs are:

-flow...how stuff goes in and out of it
-filtered air exchange
-ability to heat and cool quickly
-a dust free zone

There are all sorts of tips and tricks within that framework, that are largely driven by product.

Let me round up some pictures and such, and get a thread going on the topic.

A thread on spraying and spray shops will be good

Heating will never be needed as the minimum temp is usually 20C to 30C. Cooling will probably not happen as the air-conditioning running costs will just be too high. I will try to get dehumidification but I'm not sure that it's available.

Jerome
TS55, OF1400, Elu MOF96, Rotex150, DTS400, ETS150/3 Domino, MFK700, CXS, HL 850, Trend T11, Makita LS1212, Original Mini CV06 Cyclone, Workshop supplies drum sander, & WoodRat. Don't have don't want list: MFT
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nui-jerome/