Author Topic: Shop Wall Coverings  (Read 14935 times)

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Shop Wall Coverings
« on: September 16, 2009, 09:36 AM »
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« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 11:37 AM by sawdustinmyshoes »

Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2009, 10:17 AM »
I put up OSB board in my garage.  My new home has Drywall and I'm going to tear it down and do the same thing.

Offline Steve-CO

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2009, 10:26 AM »
My wife told me about some type of modular wall systems for basements that is durable but it sounds pricey.  Any advice on alternatives would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Joe


Owens-Corning has a wall system for basements, that may be what your wife is referring to.  I believe they only allow their certified installers to put it in, which adds to the price.  http://franchising.owenscorning.com/bfs/

Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2009, 10:30 AM »
Thats a really nice system.  I bet it is extremely expensive.  The nice thing about that system, assuming, if one panel some how gets damaged you can easily replace it?


Offline Holzhacker

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2009, 10:33 AM »
High impact drywall works well but is pricey. OSB or plywood painted with a semi-gloss or enamel are about the best from the standpoint of attaching/hanging things and being durable. I covered the drywall will all kinds of partial sheets of formica in an old shop. Made wiping down and cleaning easy but boy does that sawdust love to cling to formica.
Dave I would reconsider taking down the drywall in the garage or do research first. You may run into fire separation issues under the Code. OSB is not considered a proper fire separation. If the garage is attached there will most definitely be issues under the IRC or any local Code you have there. If the garage is detached, fire separation generally only comes into play if the garage is less than 10' from the house or 3'-5' from a lot line (close to neighbor). Measurements vary a bit depending on which Code. You may want to consider just putting the OSB on top of the drywall.
Removing the drywall could become an issue at resale time, if you get inspected by your municipality or with your Ins. provider after a fire. (i.e. there is more damage than could have been because you removed the drywall, we aren't paying)
"The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2009, 10:36 AM »
Thanks for the heads up, I really never considered that.  Why is it such a issue?  All the studs are wood.

I am going to put a gas heater in my garage when I move in and I know it's going to get inspected so thanks again for the heads up.

Offline Holzhacker

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2009, 10:49 AM »
There are numerous issues but to simplify it ... the fire resistance of drywall (assuming 5/8") gives you time to get out, helps keep the fire from spreading too rapidly, protects the framing and helps delay/avoid structural collapse before you get out and hopefully while the firemen are in there.
As far as the gas heater in the garage, there are very specific Codes regarding such an installation. Height requirements and unit protection to start. Are you looking at a space heater or hanging unit heater? Conventional or 90+? Haven't checked Code on this in a while but from what I remember standing pilots may no longer be allowed in a garage.
Are you going to have an exhaust fan for when you are working? If so then you may need to provide make-up air or a dedicated combustion air pipe for the unit.
If you let me know some details and what Code you are under I may be able to send Code sections so you have them. I have various Code books but not all.
If this is a detached garage with sufficient clearance to lot lines, house and other structures you can probably do whatever you want. If attached, you should adhere to the Code at least for your own safety.
As I tell clients, "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from". It is the minimum crappiest construction allowed.
"The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2009, 10:57 AM »
Holz,

Because this was a thread about shop coverings, I'm going to move this thread to HERE  You may want to delete your posts about heating since I moved them.  

Sorry Ruta.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2009, 11:04 AM by ForumMFG »

Offline Rey Johnson

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2009, 11:05 AM »
My garage walls are cinder-block...and the garage itself is attached to the house. I put up exposed studs on the side of the garage that is not connected to the hose and put in insulation. I use the space between the studs for storage and useable space. The rest of my walls are outfitted with pegboard and insulation.

16352-0    16354-1

Along the top of the walls, I have a cleat system anchored into the cinder-block to allow for the hanging of shelf rails anywhere I want. The peg board allow for quick and easy customizations and configurations. Some people don't like the pegboard because of the looseness of the hooks. I don't use very many hooks and instead used project cutoffs to make holders. The holders are usually screwed in small anchors that slide into the pegboard holes.

16356-2



Rey
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Offline bruegf

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2009, 12:35 PM »
Gladiator Gear Wall is really nice stuff, but quite pricy.   Lots and lots of different hooks, shelves, cabinets that hang of the wall panels. 
You can find it at Sears, Amazon, etc.

Fred
Fred

Offline Dan Rush

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2009, 07:12 PM »
I used 3/4" mdf, painted,on all the walls over 5/8 drywall ( drywall ceilings)  I had a couple of thoughts behind this.  One that I, too ,wanted the the rock to meet firecode.  I used mdf because it is fairly cost effective, and it allows me to hang just about anything anywhere without too much worry about finding studs or messing with anchors.  I also thought that it might be a bit more durable than just drywall. 

At first I was concerned about the seams, but they have held up well over the last 2 seasons.( the shop does have heat and air)  I did use biscuits and glue during installation.

Offline ForumMFG

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2009, 08:41 PM »
Dan,

Did you look into the cost of Fire rated MDF?  That stuff is extremely expensive but maybe it would offset the cost of MDF and Drywall put together?

Offline Dan Rush

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2009, 09:29 PM »
Dave, I must admit my ignorance.  I didn't know there was fire -rated mdf.  Although, it makes sense, just didn't cross my mind.  I don't know the price difference, but suspect that even if I did, I would have gone the drywall route.   

 I like the idea of having a backer to glue the mdf to, in conjunction with screws driven into the studs. Seems to me to provide an even more stable wall.  I really didn't want the seams to pop after installation.

Also, I did all of the work myself, so labor costs were not the primary consideration.(quite the opposite from my day job, where labor costs rule the day)

Dan

Offline Notorious T.O.D.

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2009, 10:15 PM »
I would go with good old drywall unless of course you can afford to cover the walls in solid hardwood T&G or raised paneling...  Drywall is easy to install and easy to repair and will look good.  I have a friend who built a 30x50 garage/workshop a few years ago and I told him to go with drywall...instead he went with OSB which he planned to paint white.  Well it took him 70 gallons of paint to cover the walls and ceiling and it still shows through that it is cheap, or not so cheap today, OSB.  I remind him how bad it looks every time I see it and he spends like 50+ hours a week in this environment....

Best,
Todd

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2009, 01:30 AM »
Will the building codes in your area allow OSB over the drywall?  That might be less work and expense than some other options.  Also. you could run one or more sets of French cleats along the walls or completely around the perimeter of the room and use them to hang panels of OSB or cabinets, etc. wherever you please.  This system based on French cleats allows easy placement, removal, replacement and relocation of your tools and storage.  The French cleat(s) are installed over drywall with long screws and can be removed later if desired.  I am using this approach in my garage/shop because I anticipate changing configuration of my tools over time.

Dave R.
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Offline Notorious T.O.D.

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2009, 04:53 PM »
  Well Joe, one day when you get bored you can go and see it for yourself....  He is just a few miles south of Greenville, PA on Rte 58...  Not sure he would admit it was a bad idea though as he never wants to admit it to me...  But they were sucking down 5 gallon pails of paint one after the other....and it still shows as rough OSB even under all that paint...

Best,
Todd

Todd,
I must reveal my sick sense of humor and tell you that I find that hilarious!  Especially the fact that you remind him constantly.  70 gallons!!  That's got to be 400-500 pounds of extra building!  Thanks!  I haven't laughed that hard in a while.

Back on topic - I'll likely go with the drywall route for the same reasons you mention.  However, I may go with painted MDF on one wall for mounting items/etc (thanks, Dan).

Thanks for the feedback, gents.

Joe

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Offline Garry

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Re: Shop Wall Coverings
« Reply #16 on: October 10, 2009, 11:31 PM »
My new shop is an unfinished room in my walk out basement.  The walls were insulated stud walls on the interior and concrete slab on the exterior walls.  I put pegboard on all the stud walls, as I can still see where the studs are to anchor heavy items, and I can hang almost anything, almost anywhere.
http://www.avidhome.com  You're only young once, but you can be immature forever!