Author Topic: Soundproofing my workshop.  (Read 16902 times)

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Offline cfullen

  • Posts: 58
Soundproofing my workshop.
« on: May 26, 2014, 06:10 AM »
In 30 days I will be breaking ground on my new home that includes a 600SF slice of heaven.  I live in a well populated neighborhood, so I'd like to take advantage of soundproofing techniques. 

The shop I am in neighbors a grumpy  that has called the police on me 27 times to date now.  Each time was for noise.  While I don't break the sound violations and thus are not breaking any laws, I'd like to avoid this in the future should I have another  for a neighbor.   

I am planning to use 2x8's on my exterior wall and fill them with foam. I think this will be sufficient, but wanted to open the discussion for alternative techniques.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2673
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2014, 07:50 AM »


Although an Australian website, this will give you some ideas, and I am sure there are equivalent products in NA.

 [smile]


http://www.gyprock.com.au/Pages/solutions/homes/noise.aspx
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Offline w802h

  • Posts: 220
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2014, 08:14 AM »
There are some sound waves that are dampened by mass and others that travel through it.  I've had the best luck mixing materials but can't give you any scientific information.  If you built a pair of  2x4 walls with staggered studs you wouldn't get sound vibration traveling through the whole 2x8 from inside to outside.  I don't know your insulation detail, but you may get more sound absorption through a combination of foam and fiberglass.  Hanging sheetrock on resilient channel may be sufficient to create a break in the wall.  Good luck with the neighbor.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3675
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Offline Bikeboy80

  • Posts: 467
    • Drumm Design Remodel
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2014, 09:08 AM »
I had good luck with a master bedroom Reno we did using blow-in fiberglass into 2x6 walls, it really deadened the outside noise of a nearby major road.

You might also have good luck doing regular fiberglass batts then running a layer of foam board insulation over the studs before the drywall. Spray foam the windows and doors with a low expansion spray foam.
The Green Koolaid sure is sweet...

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Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1920
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2014, 09:28 AM »
If you were going to drywall then consider this option http://www.quietrock.com, some Lowes stores sell it. But I would think the doors and/or windows would still be a big issue, what's your plans for these?
+1

Offline jbasen

  • Posts: 738
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2014, 10:24 AM »
The audio/video industry has been attacking this problem for home theaters for a long time and there is quite a bit of material online if you google for keywords "home theater soundproofing".  What you are trying to do is to decouple the inside walls from the outside walls so sound does not transfer from one to the other.  The most effective solution is to create a box within a box construction with the inner box decoupled from the outer box.  Unfortunately, this tends to complicate the design and building of the walls and therefore be expensive. 

Just using thick studs is not that effective because a single stud will translate the sound directly from the inner wall to the outer wall. 

Products like quiet rock mentioned above, and other similar products, build the isolation into the drywall.  I've also seen a product used (can't remember the name) where a special caulk is used to glue 2 drywall panels together.  The glue acts as an isolation barrier decoupling the inner drywall from the outer drywall. 

Hope this helps

Jay

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 364
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2014, 11:37 AM »
I did a lot of research and BS detecting when I build my basement workshop.  There was an article in FWW a few months after I built my shop that recommended the same things.  I documented the whole build here:
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?10597-Building-My-Basement-Shop&highlight=
Jay St. Peter

Offline mike68au

  • Posts: 213
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2014, 11:52 AM »
This link has a number of wall construction methods shown:    http://www.soundandvision.com/content/layout-and-design

Scroll down a little and then read the info after which explains each method.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1820
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2014, 12:07 PM »
Since sound is transmitted through walls and ceilings, to some degree, by vibration, there is a method out there that uses methods to isolate the vibration and prevent transmission. I did not use it when converting part of my basement into a workshop, because I wasn't going to finish the ceiling or walls. I'm sure that it could be found on the internet. I merely used fiberglas insulation in the ceiling, but it doesn't completely stop the sound, just enough so that it isn't a real problem in the house, though. In our family room we used double drywall and the result was excellent.
Randy

Offline blk65brd

  • Posts: 58
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2014, 01:58 PM »
You may also want to consider rockwool for both sound, insulation and a firebarrier, I just used it recently in my off-grid home for surrounding a 30KW diesel generator, it is effective and fireproof.

http://www.roxul.com/products/residential/roxul+safe'n'sound

Offline allenwiggins

  • Posts: 6
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2014, 09:22 PM »
A good friend of mine is a superintendant for a commercial acoustic company here in the CA, Bay area. What they do for sound barrier is they frame the walls, insulate and hang 5/8 drywall and finish it to a level 3. They then use metal hat channel and screw it to the drywall over the existing studs. The final step is then re-rocking over the top of the hat channel and finishing to whatever desired level of finish. If budget allows they use sound proof rock on one or both layers. The theory behind this is that whatever sound makes it through the rock will dissipate in the air space between the hat channel and first layer of drywall. Its quite more expensive and time consuming, but works very well. Hope this helps.
Any day I get to make saw dust is a good day!

Offline 3PedalMINI

  • Posts: 462
    • Signature Sound & Video
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2014, 11:41 PM »
The audio/video industry has been attacking this problem for home theaters for a long time and there is quite a bit of material online if you google for keywords "home theater soundproofing".  What you are trying to do is to decouple the inside walls from the outside walls so sound does not transfer from one to the other.  The most effective solution is to create a box within a box construction with the inner box decoupled from the outer box.  Unfortunately, this tends to complicate the design and building of the walls and therefore be expensive. 

Just using thick studs is not that effective because a single stud will translate the sound directly from the inner wall to the outer wall. 

Products like quiet rock mentioned above, and other similar products, build the isolation into the drywall.  I've also seen a product used (can't remember the name) where a special caulk is used to glue 2 drywall panels together.  The glue acts as an isolation barrier decoupling the inner drywall from the outer drywall. 

Hope this helps

Jay

Yup, Since im in the field it is something that is addressed on just about a daily basis.

"Mass" stops sound, the heavier the material the better sound "absorption" it will have. Quiet Rock is a good barrier but it is expensive, roughly $55-$75 per 4x8sheet depending on the area of the country you live in (its around 80 here in the philadelphia market)

For a shop i would absolutely build a "room within a room" bring the interior walls roughly 8-12" in but making sure to stagger the studs. Insulate the first exterior wall like normal (spray foam would be good as it adds mass) Insulate the second interior wall with something like roxul (since its cheap), then hang the 5/8" drywall like normal but have the drywall crew use this: http://www.greengluecompany.com/ then have them hang a second layer using green glue too. Or you can skip the green glue for the second layer and add the metal hat channel like was suggested above.

This is the cheapest most effective way to go about getting a noticeable reduction in sound, i can go into more detail if needed, but understand sound deadening is not cheap. Alot of the sound transmission will also come from windows and doors, so if you can try to avoid windows ( i know not ideal) another thing is your garage door is going to be another source to transmit sound, the best thing i can tell you for that is find the heaviest door you can possibly find (wood?)
The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten -Benjamin Franklin

Professional Custom Audio Video System Designer/Installer serving Southern - Middle NJ, Eastern PA & the Surrounding Shore Points.
www.sigsv.com

Kapex 120,TS55,RO150,ETS125,CT-26,CT-MIDI,Tradesmen Cleaning Kit, Festool Ratchet Kit, Sys-lite, Sys Roll Cart, T18 +3, 2013 Centrotec Kit, Carvex 420, Carvex Accessory Kit, CXS,RO90, TI15 and Various Festool Systainers

Offline Saskataper

  • Posts: 278
Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2014, 09:10 AM »
I agree with mini, double 5/8 with green glue and roxul in the walls. I've been doing a lot of research into soundproofing as I have a job coming up that needs it and the one thing I have learned is that it's not cheap and it can easily be done wrong and you can just end up wasting a lot of time and money. Don't bother with rc channel, it can be effective but 90% of the time it is installed incorrectly and the second you run a screw through it and into a stud the system is short circuited and you have lost the decoupling that the rc was providing. Sound is like water, it will travel through any point that isn't soundproofed like mini said, windows, doors, even your electrical boxes so it's kind off an all or nothing thing.
The basic elements of soundproofing are: decoupling (double stud walls or rc channel), mass (double 5/8 ),and dampening (green glue)  
There is a lot of info online about it but most of it is by manufacturers claiming there system is the best. I found green glues site to be really helpful with several different construction methods depending on what you are trying to achieve.
Good luck.

Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 364
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2014, 03:43 PM »
Man, this takes me back in time.  For a year or so after I built my shop and posted the results on Sawmill Creek I would get emails from people wanting to "soundproof" their shops.  Then some of them would argue with me about it saying that I didn't do such-and-such so it certainly wasn't good enough.  I also got emails from "sound professionals" saying that what I did wasn't good enough and my advice was unsound  [wink].  I try to stay out of the discussions now, but I will add a little.
One of the things to keep in mind is the inconvenience of some of the methods.  Using multi-layer isolated drywall means you have to be careful how you hang things on the wall.  So, no big lumber racks or heavy cabinets full of tools for you.  I used staggered stud walls to help here, but it does compromise the isolation a bit.  Good enough for me though.
Also when someone upstairs hears me working in my basement shop, it sounds like I'm doing it in the back yard (actually it's quiet enough that it sounds like I'm doing it several blocks behind the back yard).  That's because the glass french door and window in my shop both point out back.  But, I wasn't willing to give up natural light.
To prevent annoying your neighbors, ensuring the walls are all insulated well and making sure the doors and windows are minimal and solid would be my first cut.  Keep it simple.  IMO, if you don't need complete and total isolation, most products for soundproofing are serious cost escalators.  A few basics should be good enough to keep the neighbors at bay.  Block or cement walls would be awesome.  Thicker walls as described or 2x6, maybe with staggered studs should also be fine.  But I suspect your best bang for the buck is going to be heavy doors, good windows and good insulation.  I'd also suggest an insulated staggered stud 2x6 wall on the interior side where your shop meets the house and an exterior door between the shop and the house.  That'll keep house mates happy too.
Jay St. Peter

Offline idmix.be

  • Posts: 1
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2014, 04:15 PM »
Search the internet for box-in-box sound insulation. 

inside walls can be made from one layer osb on metals stud.  Roofing (without stones)  attached to that.  Gypsum on top of that.  Fill the metalstud with homatherm or rockwool.  If you put that in front of an outside wall with some air in between the outside wall en the inside wall you'll be fine.  You need mass and air to soundproof. 

Be ware of doors and windows.  These will be you weakest links.

And don't forget fresh air if you make everything soundproof.  Sound doesn't make u-turns.  So if u use something like sonoflex  (insulated flexibel duct)  and you bend it twice 90degrees, it will be soundproof.






Offline Mustangpwr

  • Posts: 5
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2014, 11:29 PM »
I used roxul in my ceiling to keep the noise down between the 2 floors and it works well but I still can hear noise when it comes from certain angels (there were holes in the sub floor which I didn’t fill) If I were to do it again I would have used 1" of spray foam to fill all the small voids and cracks or in your case seal every thing up from the outside then stuff the ceiling with as much insulation as I could fit in. A wall of solid foam would not work as soundproofing. Green glue and quiet rock will give you a good barrier so will hanging acoustic panes or heavy curtains over the windows to keep down the echo.  Putting your dust collector/ compressor in a closet will help too.

Offline roblg3

  • Posts: 751
  • Transforming into a whole new machine
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2014, 09:09 AM »
ive been doing some research on antivibration gloves, and i came across this some information search "impacto.co" on the web. don't forget about sound traveling through your floors!
Rob Gardner
Operator
RL3 Enterprises

Offline shed9

  • Posts: 461
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2014, 04:03 PM »
Surely you need to work the other way around? The first thing you need to know is what are the noisiest and most frequently used machines that produce high levels of noise then determine what levels of sound deadening you need.

Also, I'm not sure I saw any similar advice up there ^ but given the cost and effort in soundproofing - this may be an opportunity to control the sound level at source. For example;

> Should your nosiest machine be a thicknesser / jointer / planer, etc then look to invest in spiral cutters.
> Replace noisy universal motors where possible.
> Get a quieter DC system if possible or at the least soundproof that unit.

Maybe separate your work space and minimise where you run noisy machines and hence reduce the cost and work involved, i.e. put a smaller box within the larger building (if that makes sense).

Whilst I appreciate your need to minimise disruption to your neighbours, a main priority should be your own ears within your shop.

Oh and when can we get some pics  [smile]

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1820
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2014, 04:56 PM »
The real first step is to determine how much you really need to sound proof. Is this an outside building? Is this a garage? Is this in your basement? Each of those might be different in what level of soundproofing you want to end up with. Is there a need to essentially completely soundproof to the outside world or just enough so that neighbors aren't bothered. When is most of your work going to be done? During the day? Late at night (when people are sleeping)? I would take the view that extraordinary measures may not be necessary, meaning that getting most of the noise blocked to the outside world would be enough; not essentially 100%.

I would also agree that your hearing is a high priority. You would want to keep noise to a minimum in the shop regardless of the effectiveness of the hearing protection you wear. Since I've moved more to Festools and other lower sound producing tools (like hand tools), I found the noise levels have dropped also and aren't so important (still need hearing protection though).

So, if it were me, I'd take a look at the whole picture and decide whether the incremental improvements in sound proofing justify the additional cost.
Randy

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1983
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2014, 07:53 PM »
I would go over to the neighbor and tell him that you do woodworking. I would ask him if he does. If he says yes, I would do minimal soundproofing. If he says no, I would ask if he has interest to do so and offer him some free lessons. Let him hear how things are in the shop versus outside it.

I realize your current/old neighbor is an a-hole but not every neighbor is.

A little hospitality may go a long way and save you a ton of money.
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline insurroundsound

  • Posts: 45
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2014, 09:22 PM »
I'm definitely not an expert in this field, but do have some experience with it, being in the audio/video field as well.  Back in the day [bout a decade ago], we actually built the very first THX-certified residential screening room in the country.  First resi theatre room with an official THX plague and certified by THX engineers.  Worked on a slew of rooms requiring isolation.  I've personally worked with and installed various materials choices out there: greenglue, quietrock, vinyl loaded barriers, staggered stud walls, isolation clips on resilient channeling, floating walls, complete rooms within a room, etc.  The one common denominator:  isolation done well is not cheap, and your investment can be easily screwed up by improper install of an otherwise good solution/product.

Like others have mentioned, first determine what level of noise you'd like to eliminate.  And also try to think of a budget you'd like to set up for this [trust me, it can get expensive quick].  There are vendors and consultants out there ,as well, who could help, too.  Unless you're independently wealthy, most people do as much isolation as they can within their budget.  Quietrock is expensive and not the easiest to work with.  Used it in the past on a few projects, but accomplished the same or better with some of the easier options out there as well.  I wouldn't choose to use it again.  Room within a room or staggered stud buildouts tend to be more straightforward and cost-effective builds.  As for the amount of gap between the walls, my experience has been that you don't need much to be quite effective--just a few inches.  But you do need some. Another option [either with or without the room within a room]: using isolation clips and resilient channeling to eliminate noise transfer.  While not rocket-science, that option needs to be implemented correctly by all affected trades [whomever installs the clips & channeling; sheetrockers; etc.], otherwise the benefit can be lost/compromised.  This is one of the reasons why calling for two layers of rock instead of floating the walls on channeling is so popular--it's difficult for all involved trades to screw that up.

Another area where people screw up with isolation is improper treatment for all the penetrations into the room [electrical boxes; pipes; HVAC; etc.]  You wouldn't wont to drop $ on a room-within-a-room build, only to compromise its performance by not addressing the penetrations needed into the space.

Kinetics Noise Control is a good source for isolation help.  They're a manufacturer, but also very helpful in giving consult.   Let them know what you're planning to do and they can offer some suggestions.  Kinetics sources IsoMax clips as well [we've used RSIC-1 clips from PAC Intl, too].  Roxul is great for sound proofing and insulation use.

Isolation isn't cheap, but it doesn't need to be "exotic extravagant either.  Yes, you may get better isolation from a wider gap between the walls or the use of a special compound or glue.  But remember you should be striving for a cumulative effect of multiple isolation solutions that wont break your budget.   I wouldn't blow the budget on one exotic soln.  But address the isolation in as many areas as feasibly possible, preferably in the areas that will yield the greatest results.  After talking with Kinetics and others, you may find that there could be a cost-effective way of isolating the primary noise generators [compressors, etc.] themselves.  That would benefit not only your neighbor, but you as well.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 11:13 PM by insurroundsound »
--John
Proud, Poor Owner of TS55; MFT/3; CT22; OF1400EQ; CT Midi; ETS150/3; DF500+Domino Set; HKC55; MFK700; LR32 Set; ; RO150; TS55REQ; Pro5 LTD;  and a mix of other Festool green and Tanos blue.

Offline 3PedalMINI

  • Posts: 462
    • Signature Sound & Video
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2014, 11:40 PM »
I'm definitely not an expert in this field, but do have some experience with it, being in the audio/video field as well.  Back in the day [bout a decade ago], we actually built the very first THX-certified residential screening room in the country.  First resi theatre room with an official THX plague and certified by THX engineers.  Worked on a slew of rooms requiring isolation.  I've personally worked with and installed various materials choices out there: greenglue, quietrock, vinyl loaded barriers, staggered stud walls, isolation clips on resilient channeling, floating walls, complete rooms within a room, etc.  The one common denominator:  isolation done well is not cheap, and your investment can be easily screwed up by improper install of an otherwise good solution/product.

Like others have mentioned, first determine what level of noise you'd like to eliminate.  And also try to think of a budget you'd like to set up for this [trust me, it can get expensive quick].  There are vendors and consultants out there ,as well, who could help, too.  Unless you're independently wealthy, most people do as much isolation as they can within their budget.  Quietrock is expensive and not the easiest to work with.  Used it in the past on a few projects, but accomplished the same or better with some of the easier options out there as well.  I wouldn't choose to use it again.  Room within a room or staggered stud buildouts tend to be more straightforward and cost-effective builds.  As for the amount of gap between the walls, my experience has been that you don't need much to be quite effective--just a few inches.  But you do need some. Another option [either with or without the room within a room]: using isolation clips and resilient channeling to eliminate noise transfer.  While not rocket-science, that option needs to be implemented correctly by all affected trades [whomever installs the clips & channeling; sheetrockers; etc.], otherwise the benefit can be lost/compromised.  This is one of the reasons why calling for two layers of rock instead of floating the walls on channeling is so popular--it's difficult for all involved trades to screw that up.

Another area where people screw up with isolation is improper treatment for all the penetrations into the room [electrical boxes; pipes; HVAC; etc.]  You wouldn't wont to drop $ on a room-within-a-room build, only to compromise its performance by not addressing the penetrations needed into the space.

Kinetics Noise Control is a good source for isolation help.  They're a manufacturer, but also very helpful in giving consult.   Let them know what you're planning to do and they can offer some suggestions.  Kinetics sources IsoMax clips as well [we've used RSIC-1 clips from PAC Intl, too].  Roxul is great for sound proofing and insulation use.

Isolation isn't cheap, but it doesn't need to be "exotic extravagant either.  Yes, you may get better isolation from a wider gap between the walls or the use of a special compound or glue.  But remember you should be striving for a cumulative effect of multiple isolation solutions that wont break your budget.   I wouldn't blow the budget on one exotic soln.  But address the isolation in as many areas as feasibly possible, preferably in the areas that will yield the greatest results.  After talking with Kinetics and others, you may find that there could be a cost-effective way of isolating the primary noise generators [compressors, etc.] themselves.  That would benefit not only your neighbor, but you as well.


Well said man, saved me from going into more detail ;) Kinetics is who you want to call if you want to get serious about this. They will offer you some tips usually over the phone. I have sent them a few plans for theaters and the budget we have to work with and they come up with some solutions.

insurroundsound, are you over at RC,IP or ESI?
The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten -Benjamin Franklin

Professional Custom Audio Video System Designer/Installer serving Southern - Middle NJ, Eastern PA & the Surrounding Shore Points.
www.sigsv.com

Kapex 120,TS55,RO150,ETS125,CT-26,CT-MIDI,Tradesmen Cleaning Kit, Festool Ratchet Kit, Sys-lite, Sys Roll Cart, T18 +3, 2013 Centrotec Kit, Carvex 420, Carvex Accessory Kit, CXS,RO90, TI15 and Various Festool Systainers

Offline insurroundsound

  • Posts: 45
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2014, 01:26 AM »
Hey there, 3ped!...yup, I don't post a lot on the forums [wish I had more time to].  I go by NorCal AV on those three forums.  Don't wanna derail this thread, but I picked up a '14 Transit Connect as well.  Working on upfits right now, when I can...we'll have to chat about it offline or in another thread.  I'm enjoying the van tho.

--John
Proud, Poor Owner of TS55; MFT/3; CT22; OF1400EQ; CT Midi; ETS150/3; DF500+Domino Set; HKC55; MFK700; LR32 Set; ; RO150; TS55REQ; Pro5 LTD;  and a mix of other Festool green and Tanos blue.

Offline 3PedalMINI

  • Posts: 462
    • Signature Sound & Video
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2014, 05:14 PM »
Hey there, 3ped!...yup, I don't post a lot on the forums [wish I had more time to].  I go by NorCal AV on those three forums.  Don't wanna derail this thread, but I picked up a '14 Transit Connect as well.  Working on upfits right now, when I can...we'll have to chat about it offline or in another thread.  I'm enjoying the van tho.



Sent you a PM!
The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten -Benjamin Franklin

Professional Custom Audio Video System Designer/Installer serving Southern - Middle NJ, Eastern PA & the Surrounding Shore Points.
www.sigsv.com

Kapex 120,TS55,RO150,ETS125,CT-26,CT-MIDI,Tradesmen Cleaning Kit, Festool Ratchet Kit, Sys-lite, Sys Roll Cart, T18 +3, 2013 Centrotec Kit, Carvex 420, Carvex Accessory Kit, CXS,RO90, TI15 and Various Festool Systainers

Offline Mopowers

  • Posts: 86
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2014, 09:41 PM »
Dense pack cellulose is far more effective at reducing sound through walls than any other common insulation material. Much cheaper than spray foam too.

Offline TBR

  • Posts: 109
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2014, 05:08 PM »
This guy has a solution that might be ideal for machine noise. It absorbs bass sounds (the hardest to isolate) and its cheap and easy to DIY.



I'd be interested to know if this works.
Normal people... believe that if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5292
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Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2014, 05:04 AM »
My advice is the same that I gave Mat. Go talk to them. Communication can solve a lot of problems.

When I had y get together, I talked to the neighbor she even helped out with the parking by letting me use her drive way.

A little communication and compromise can solve a lot of problems.

Offline jmbfestool

  • Posts: 6625
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2014, 05:23 AM »
I have sound proofed my workshop I have had machines running and I can't really hear anything.

All I used was 50mm mineral wool and 50mm metal studding attached to a suspended ceiling.   

Saying that the exterior walls are 200mm thick hollow blocks in some places and other solid concrete and the ceiling is suspended from a blocksnd beam floor.   



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Offline jmbfestool

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Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2014, 05:24 AM »
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Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1820
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2014, 08:01 AM »
Regular fiberglas insulation isn't probably the best soundproofing material, but, it you don't have to make the shop perfectly sound proof, it has worked well for me. My shop is on the other end of the housed from the bedrooms and in the basement. I have soundproofed the ceiling with fiberglas insulation and the walls between the shop and the rest of the basement with drywall, fiberglas insulation and, on the other side (which is a family room), drywall with an outside layer of sound board. Between the rooms, very little sound comes through. Upward, more comes through, but I rarely worked when my kids and wife were asleep. Now, that the kids are out of the house, and I am retiriing soon, I may work at night more. It could be a problem, but the point is that, if you don't have to block all sound, fiberglas insulation can work.
Randy

Offline wow

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Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2014, 07:01 PM »
On of the most important lessons I learned about soundproofing doing Home Theater work (Home Theatre for those of you who prefer metric [wink]) was that MASS stops vibration.

As mentioned before, the cheapest solution for most shop applications would be to add a second layer of sheetrock on top of the first.

If you're starting from scratch, consider using only 5/8" because of it's extra mass. Install the first layer. Tape and mud all the joints like normal. Although the finish doesn't have to be PERFECT, it has to be COMPLETE - no holes or gaps or weak spots for sound to get through.

Install the second layer, alternating the seams and joints. Try not to let ANY joints or seams line up except where you can't avoid it, like in the corners. Even there you can minimize the possibility of 'bleed through' by carefully installing the top layer opposite of the first layer - i.e. if the first layer had the left piece going all the way to the stud(wall) and the right piece butting up against it, make the top layer have the RIGHT piece go all the way to the wall/stud and the LEFT piece butting up against it.

Doing this requires a little care and planning, but it adds almost NO COST if you're doing it yourself, and it WILL pay off in major sound transmission reduction!
Trying to be one of the most helpful members on the FOG.

Offline gstuartw

  • Posts: 66
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2014, 09:05 PM »
I had good luck with a master bedroom Reno we did

 [eek] No comment….haha!

Offline carlb40

  • Posts: 370
  • Site carpenter
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #33 on: August 08, 2014, 01:38 PM »
My workshop is built from 4x2 timber studs, external shiplap cladding ( no ply/ sheathing) Insulated with 4 inch kingspan foam. 1/2" plasterboard - plastered. The floor is 6x2 timbers with 3/4" ply glued/screwed to the timbers.
4" fibreglass insulation in the ceiling and same treatment as the internal walls.
I have run my benchtop thicknesser, extractor ( vacuum type) and router table all running at the same time, and to hear that lot i need to be within 10ft of the workshop. :)
Carl

Never never go, never never know [smile]

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Offline anilchandran

  • Posts: 1
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #34 on: November 03, 2016, 09:30 AM »
in such a situation , best solution is to have a temporary sound proof wall, but for effective sound proof it is better to go for layer by layer tempory wall, or curtain for example, i recomment to go through this article www.soundbarrierfence.com/…/und-Barrier-Insulation.html and www.soundbarrierfence.com/…/f-Fencing-Introduction.html
look how 4 layer sound reduction is used to make a sound proof fence. and better part is its easy to remove and transport. i hope it is helpful for all

Offline Brent Taylor

  • Posts: 471
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #35 on: November 05, 2016, 12:06 PM »
I sure someone has posted the wall system that I use, but here goes. Double 2x4 walls with spaced upper and lower plates, with the second upper plate tying the walls together. F.G. sound batts and drywall on sound channels. I have used it for years and found it to be the most cost effective system. B

Offline antss

  • Posts: 1453
Re: Soundproofing my workshop.
« Reply #36 on: November 05, 2016, 04:03 PM »
Mineral or Rock wool is the insulation you want for sound attenuation.

Fiberglass is really only a feel good solution.