Author Topic: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch  (Read 6974 times)

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Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« on: August 28, 2017, 01:40 PM »
I had a shop thread at one point but deleted it, and at this stage of the game of building a new one I thought I'd reintroduce it. I am chronicling it in multiple places, and for the fastest pictures please see my IG account. I'll do my best to keep this up to date as I go, but I am pretty much doing all the labor, the pics, the writing solo so some things might get missed.

Phase One of The 144 Workshop is a shed that came with our house we bought in 2009. It probably predates that by at least a decade if not more. 12 foot square, or 144 inches square (just over 3.5m square) if you count the walls. It was built using some interesting choices, and set on stacked cinder blocks. It came with carpet and drapes and water damage. It has continued to sink and become unlevel as the years have gone by, and has been taken over a bit by spiders, carpenter ants, carpenter bees, and has seen other adventures along the way.

Due to local government stipulations, a new shop with the exact same footprint is being built a few feet away, but this time with a few tricks up its sleeve to make it all worthwhile. I'll start the next reply with a bit more history, and the third post will get everything up to date with progress on the new shop at the time this thread is created.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 08:49 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2017, 01:40 PM »
Started woodworking in 2010 or so, and started really working on turning this shed into a shop in early 2011 I think. It's a cheaply built shed, 12x12 feet exterior dimensions. A shallow pitch gable roof, and the interior and exterior was clad in 1/4" ply everywhere. I was told the previous owner used it as a beer drinking spot, and although there is an exterior light installed and wiring, no power was available to it.

I did pretty well turning into a shop, as cramped as it is. Started out small with a router table and a table saw. I eventually tore down most of the interior walls (and the boards underneath used to back the ply) and replaced with 7/16" OSB for storage and stability. Never got to one corner though. Ceiling came down and got to use some of the rafters as storage, although my original intent was to figure out just what was going on with the power. If there was power run, it wasn't there any longer. Maybe one day I'll find a buried cable with a misplaced shoveling attempt. I ran my shop first by one, then two extension cords which limited just what tools and accessories I could run. It was also freezing in the winter and boiling hot in the summer.

Even with these limitations it became a shop that could handle most anything I chose. I even completed my biggest projects to date, two dining tables - one for myself, one for a friend that turned into a commission. I added heat and air conditioning, and overhead lights. I even added a computer, a TV, and a digital assistant. Cramped, but it was a great spot to hang out and occasionally accomplish things.

A couple years ago though, the diverter on the roof came undone and started causing issues. First was a leak into the shop, which thankfully was easily fixed. But then the bottom of the exterior started rotting, thanks to how unlevel the shed had become. As the rot progressed further, and the level of the shop was never going to be addressed, and for many other reasons, I became serious about replacing it.

IMG_0683 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Unfortunately, due to zoning regulations it would have cost a fortune to build a larger shop on my property. If you do that, then you say why not permanent power as well. Even just building a foot bigger than I was would cost $1000 before I got started in survey costs. I just couldn't justify the cost. But what I could do what go up a bit, and perhaps choose a roof that allowed for more storage space at least. My dream of a bigger shop with permanent electricity and HVAC and plumbing is on indefinite hold, but at least I can have a shop that the little things I deal with now are addressed. Like my router table drawers not staying closed. Or having to use a multitude of extension strips. Or having to kill spiders and ants all the time. And my favorite, having room for a true dust extraction system.

So, after years of putting up with what I did, on July 1 I set out to build a shop that will survive my needs while we are at this property.

IMG_20150501_1955187883-1024x576 by Cochese H, on Flickr
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 02:29 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 01:41 PM »
I had actually set out almost two years ago to build a new shop, but something had gotten in my way: the earth. We live on a granite outcropping, and there are stones and boulders everywhere. My plan to sink piers was not going to work without dynamite or heavy machinery. So I gave up for then and tried to make do. With the shop threatening to fall down however, I was forced to think about things again. This time, it would be sleepers instead of piers. Why not concrete? My property is not level at any point, and using a prepared site would again force me to spend that $1000 before I got started. It was going to be sleepers, or nothing at all.

For full disclosure, I am required no permits or any supervision to take on a building under 200 square feet. I cannot build a bigger shop in suitable locations on my property due to setback rules. So it is a 144 square foot shop located about seven feet off two property lines. I am building this to the standard I think it should be, where no real building code exists for what I am doing. The shop will be sold as is or can be torn down when we move.

I bought shovels and a mattock, and went to work. This is what I found:

IMG_0682 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Thankfully, the mattock was just the right tool for the job and it went fairly well. This is the sleeper pit that is lowest on the hill. I probably should have gone for the highest, but I know better now. The tamper came out and compacted both the dirt and the 3/4 stone down to make a solid bed for the sleeper to sit in.

IMG_0685 by Cochese H, on Flickr

The middle sleeper pit actually had the most rocks in it, and the high pit was actually softer surface dirt. I'd say the middle pit was the most time consuming.

IMG_0693 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then it came time to level everything, and I went with the string method and a piece of survey equipment I was gifted. If you guessed my error in an earlier picture, you know that I was never going to be level without either raising up the sleepers on the lower side or digging out a bunch of ground. With the granite just below, I went with going up.

IMG_0706 by Cochese H, on Flickr

I went with solid concrete blocks to raise the low side up and get everything level. It required a single layer in the middle, and two and three on the low side. I secured those together with construction adhesive. The pic above shows me having to slightly adjust the middle sleeper pit to get the floor joist to sit flush.

Now, it's entirely possible I've set myself up for catastrophic failure using these concrete blocks. After all, they are what were used to put me in the situation I am in now. However I think I've done the ground work properly this time, used the right materials, done the right prep, used better materials and techniques than they did before. What's done is done at this point, criticism is fine just be nice about it. It's not changing at this point and hopefully you'll never have the opportunity to say I told you so.

The sleepers are 6x6 PT beams, and the floor joists are 2x6 PT. Here, the floor joists are done. When I installed the plywood (again, PT) subfloor I realized the noggins/stretchers were in the wrong places. That was fixed to provide better contact and support points for how the panels were installed.

IMG_0711 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Due to expense, I wasn't planning on insulating the floor, but found a fantastic deal on some R-19 perforated batts and ended up insulating the floor for about $50. Then the 3/4" PT plywood went on top and I found myself at a stopping point.

IMG_0715 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0716 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0718 by Cochese H, on Flickr

It was then time to go on a family vacation, so the project sat for awhile until this past weekend when I started on the roof. When I realized I would have to keep the same footprint, I decided pretty quickly that I would at least gain some more storage space above my head. So, I settled on a gambrel or barn-style roof. If I went to the allowed height, I could gain almost enough room in the attic to stand up - a great place to put a dust extractor, a compressor, store materials...I wouldn't grow any on the main floor, but I could put a few more things upstairs and gain some practical room. It was an easy decision, but harder to pull off. Gambrel calculations are a bit tricky, but there is some online calculators that help.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

First thing to do was to cut the gussets. I built an outdoor assembly/track saw table a few weeks prior, and used it here along with my homemade parallel guides to cross cut the gussets. Unable to go narrow enough to cut them to final size, I cut in doubles and did a final rip at the table saw.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then a stop block on the miter saw to cut them in half.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

I made all the angles and lengths on the gambrel roof equal to save errors, so I needed to cut a 135° peak on the gussets. Thankfully my miter saw could do the 22.5° cut I needed and that saved a lot of time. Cut, flip, cut, done.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Was able to go from bringing it home to done with the gussets in just a couple hours.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then it was time to cut the 2x4s for the rafters. This was a little bit of trial and error at first, but thankfully only one board was spoiled and I got all ten rafter assemblies complete and ready for the next phase (pictured is five, at the end of the day). The outside overhang will be done later.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr


This week I am brushing up on wall framing, as much as I can brush up never having done it before. I'm pretty confident, just need to select my doors and windows and account for the rough framing for those until I can buy them. Hoping to have at least a wall assembled by the end of this coming weekend.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 02:26 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two (shop replacement thread)
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 10:00 AM »
Made three window headers last night. Only planning on two windows for now, but only took a couple more minutes and a couple more dollars to make and install should I choose to put in. May even go with three from the jump, who knows.

IMG_0816 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two (shop replacement thread)
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2017, 08:48 PM »
Walls are beginning to appear.

IMG_0820 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0821 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Got about half donw with the opposing wall before the rains came.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2017, 10:27 PM »
Walls (at least the structure) are complete.

IMG_0826 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2017, 05:35 PM »
Screwed up the order a bit in which I did this, I should have sheathed the walls first, but there you go. The end rafter will be done like that.

IMG_0829 by Cochese H, on Flickr


Offline Bob D.

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2017, 09:51 PM »
You're making progress. Should be closed in before long.

Is that one of Lee's SharkGuards I see on your table saw?
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Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 09:43 AM »
You're making progress. Should be closed in before long.

Is that one of Lee's SharkGuards I see on your table saw?

Yes, I was made aware of him when I owned the Craftsman version of the Ryobi BT3 table saw. Think I bought this one in 2011 or so, and ordered the riving knife for the new saw and switched it over. Excited for the new shop to be done so I can have proper dust collection to see how that works.

I should be buying the sheathing this week, at least in a part order. Going with Zip as it's supposed to be rated for six months unprotected.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 09:59 PM »
Beginning the dry-in process.

IMG_0833 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline neilc

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2017, 01:12 AM »
You're making great progress.  Looks like a near identical building in the yard behind your home.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2017, 12:41 PM »
You're making great progress.  Looks like a near identical building in the yard behind your home.

Thanks. I think his is a 10x10 prefab with a partial loft (or maybe none at all). The neighbors to the back left have also built a building in our shared corner, their's is more of a styled one, and have no idea what they are using it for.

The tape on this system is a breeze, and I'll finish up shortly. Then I need to figure out how to put the end panels up.

IMG_0835 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0837 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2017, 06:04 PM »
Well kids, I guess the lesson here is to not try and start sheathing when a hurricane is coming. In my defense, it wasn't coming here, it was going up the coast when I started on the sixth.

So, I was in a bit of a rush to try and get this thing buttoned up sufficiently. There were a few moments when I went into full panic mode. Like when I was up on an extension ladder by myself at 10pm on Sunday trying to get the flashing tape up - until I ran out a few minutes later.

I figured out that I couldn't put the roof up without having the attic floor in, so that was my first task.



This is what my old shop is, from the attic. The ground level is about the same between the two, so you can see I'm already well higher than I ever was.



Yeah, I got this up there myself. Working out is paying off.



Got the end panel up with the first run of sheathing. Here is my first mistake of the weekend, I meant to stagger the panels.



Fast forward to about 3pm on Sunday. I was so busy Saturday and Sunday that I didn't stop for pictures. This is with half the roof done.



I still had three large panels and six smaller panels to fill in at about 7pm last night. This was my panic moment. I got the roof panels up, but the fits aren't great (truthfully they aren't great all around the roof) so we'll see how this flashing tape holds up. I tried to save money by making the most use of the panels, but in the end mistakes led to probably the same amount and a worse fit in places. As such, I'll end up using felt on the roof anyway, and I actually may contract that out. I don't really have a suitable ladder for the terrain, and that's pretty high up for someone that is less than enthused about heights. Too many rocks and such on the ground for me to escape serious injury.

I'm just waiting for Irma to pass through tomorrow so I can see how badly my roof leaks, because like I said I ran out of tape. I hit the couple of big gaps with, you guessed it, duck tape. We'll see if it's at all of any use. The attic is almost completely floored in with a small space where I can get up on a ladder. It's OSB though, and hopefully it doesn't do too much damage before I can get some more tape up there (has to be a dry surface to adhere).



I spent far too much money in a short time frame, and I am physically broken. I have the get up and go of an 80-year old today.


Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2017, 10:41 PM »
Spent the first part of the week catching my breath and getting some more tape up on the roof. No rain since then, I'm kinda anxious for that to happen and pass that test.

Updates from the last couple of days. Getting some simple doors going.



Frame for the doors. 2x6 on the lock side.



Dominos with screws acting as temp clamps.



Hinges are designed not to back out.



LP Smartside in redwood pattern. This is the hardest wall, because I'm trying to get the doors to line up with the other panels.



Got the locks in, but it's not yet secure. Need to put a stem lock at top and bottom of the right door and mortise the locks on that door too.



Unlike my current shop, these doors stay open. Tells me everything is nice and level. Inside of the doors will be rigid foam and something to put over that as well for storage.

This weekend: finish the doors and windows go in.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2017, 08:47 PM »
Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.






Offline bkharman

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2017, 09:44 AM »
Looking nice mate!  I am a big fan of zip walls. Make the process so easy (albeit not cheapish). Look like the last hurricane didn’t impact too much, and hope the same for Maria.

Nice digs!

Cheers. Bryan.


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Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2017, 10:03 AM »
Thanks. Irma wasn't really a big thing on the north side of Atlanta thankfully, just rain that came through the gaps on the roof when I ran out of tape. I'm actually wanting it to rain soon so I can test the tape. The side I did tape did leak through slightly, so I added another layer overlapping and paid more attention to rolling.

It's very surreal to see it standing in the backyard after years of hoping it would happen.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2017, 07:01 PM »
I have partial power now. Plus I framed out my attic stairs.




(TV/PC outlet)


The math for the attic stairs was going well until I realized the angle was going to be variable. Then I just winged it.


Starting the overhead circuit run.


Lights in the shop now are controlled by a power strip. Now I have an actual switch.


Drop down stairs framed out.


Going with plug-in lights at least at first, three banks evenly spaced.


Inlets came today, testing all the outlets and switch.


These are the only ways power comes in, so using an inlet here is safe.


In-use cover protects from the elements.

Online Peter Halle

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2017, 07:06 PM »
ROCK IT DUDE!  Major milestone.  And keep posting progress picts.  Gives us motivation and inspiration.  And I might add, at no cost to us  [big grin].

Peter
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Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2017, 07:10 PM »
ROCK IT DUDE!  Major milestone.  And keep posting progress picts.  Gives us motivation and inspiration.  And I might add, at no cost to us  [big grin].

Peter

Thanks man, means a lot.

I also started helping out my son's soccer coach a couple weeks ago, after we had been losing 8-1 and 7-1. I volunteered to take on the defense.

It was a 1-1 tie today. I'm just as proud of that. It was a good day.

Offline mike_aa

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2017, 09:00 PM »
This is so cool!  I can't wait to see the progress now that it's buttoned in!

Thanks for sharing!

Mike A.

Offline DB10

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2017, 11:34 PM »
 Hats off to you, considering all the crap weather you guy's have been having of late, you have done well to get the build this far, now your work has moved to the inside I'm sure it will be a lot easier and more pleasurable going forward and finishing the project.

Offline neilc

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2017, 11:56 PM »
Great progress.  Codes that allow romex make it so easy for wiring.  Here in Chicago everything has to be conduit.

Thanks for the photos and congrats on getting it closed in with no issues from Irma.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2017, 04:11 PM by neilc »

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2017, 10:37 AM »
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans
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Offline Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2017, 12:03 PM »
Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2017, 09:42 PM »
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans

I wish you hadn't asked me about the budget. I was doing extremely well keeping track of everything right up until the Hurricane weekend. Went from just under $900 spent to over $1700 spent, best I can figure. Now that things are settled down I can keep better track. Still a number of huge expenses coming up, like putting down a decent looking floor, roofing, insulation, interior and exterior walls, etc. I'm guessing I'll end up spending somewhere in the 4-5k range, which is still quite a bit cheaper than I would have gotten by buying.

Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Buried electrical was never really in the cards. That adds the expense of having it run and hooked up, plus surveying for a permanent foundation, and then if you've spent that much you might as well spend more to expand it. $15k wasn't really something I wanted to put in this house. Not after an $8k window bill.

I'll probably do one run of electrical up in the attic to handle the dust extractor, air compressor, a light, and maybe a spare outlet to sharpen tools with the grinder. Haven't decided on that last part yet.

The doors turned out better than I expected. The composite siding is pretty stiff, and using the Dominos I assume helped as well. I still need to do some minor sanding with the belt to keep things from sticking in one spot. Very happy thus far, and there will be some sort of weatherstripping. Will just depend on what I need out of it. There will also be some rigid foam and something on the back to allow for some light storage.

Suicide cables? Braver than I am. These are some Journeyman Pro jobs I got off of Amazon and used the Hubbell housing and deep metal box.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2017, 09:48 PM by Cochese »

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2017, 09:51 PM »
- you're getting a lot of utility for a one time outlay of around $ 5k plus the satisfaction that the job is done "your way". - thanks for sharing.
Hans
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans

I wish you hadn't asked me about the budget. I was doing extremely well keeping track of everything right up until the Hurricane weekend. Went from just under $900 spent to over $1700 spent, best I can figure. Now that things are settled down I can keep better track. Still a number of huge expenses coming up, like putting down a decent looking floor, roofing, insulation, interior and exterior walls, etc. I'm guessing I'll end up spending somewhere in the 4-5k range, which is still quite a bit cheaper than I would have gotten by buying.

Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Buried electrical was never really in the cards. That adds the expense of having it run and hooked up, plus surveying for a permanent foundation, and then if you've spent that much you might as well spend more to expand it. $15k wasn't really something I wanted to put in this house. Not after an $8k window bill.

I'll probably do one run of electrical up in the attic to handle the dust extractor, air compressor, a light, and maybe a spare outlet to sharpen tools with the grinder. Haven't decided on that last part yet.

The doors turned out better than I expected. The composite siding is pretty stiff, and using the Dominos I assume helped as well. I still need to do some minor sanding with the belt to keep things from sticking in one spot. Very happy thus far, and there will be some sort of weatherstripping. Will just depend on what I need out of it. There will also be some rigid foam and something on the back to allow for some light storage.

Suicide cables? Braver than I am. These are some Journeyman Pro jobs I got off of Amazon and used the Hubbell housing and deep metal box.

TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE Guide Rail Squares -  the MTR-18 Triangle and Work Holding solutions

Offline Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2017, 10:10 PM »
Suicide cables? Braver than I am.

Suicide cables...now that’s funny. It’s one way to get the job done, however...I prefer your approach.

Offline duginsky

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2017, 06:23 PM »
I have partial power now. Plus I framed out my attic stairs.




(TV/PC outlet)


The math for the attic stairs was going well until I realized the angle was going to be variable. Then I just winged it.


Starting the overhead circuit run.


Lights in the shop now are controlled by a power strip. Now I have an actual switch.


Drop down stairs framed out.


Going with plug-in lights at least at first, three banks evenly spaced.


Inlets came today, testing all the outlets and switch.


These are the only ways power comes in, so using an inlet here is safe.


In-use cover protects from the elements.


I am doing a nearly identical set-up and am grateful for your postings. Would you be able to share a phot of how you wired the inlet on the inside of the build and also mind telling me which wire you used for all of the outlest/lights? Are you running an extension cord to the inlet - and if so, how many amps do you plan to supply to the building? Thanks agin for sharing this. It is really nice to follow along.

Regards,
Casey

Offline Mikeoutrage

  • Posts: 9
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2017, 09:06 PM »
I would suggest rustoleum epoxyshield for the floor. I did my 24x32 t&g floor with it two years ago and it still looks great. Paint and glue comes off wet or dry easily. Best thing my wife talked me into. I did fill all holes and joints then belt sanded the whole floor. I do have hairline cracks on the joints but my shop is not conditioned.