Author Topic: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch  (Read 10599 times)

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Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« on: August 28, 2017, 01:40 PM »
I had a shop thread at one point but deleted it, and at this stage of the game of building a new one I thought I'd reintroduce it. I am chronicling it in multiple places, and for the fastest pictures please see my IG account. I'll do my best to keep this up to date as I go, but I am pretty much doing all the labor, the pics, the writing solo so some things might get missed.

Phase One of The 144 Workshop is a shed that came with our house we bought in 2009. It probably predates that by at least a decade if not more. 12 foot square, or 144 inches square (just over 3.5m square) if you count the walls. It was built using some interesting choices, and set on stacked cinder blocks. It came with carpet and drapes and water damage. It has continued to sink and become unlevel as the years have gone by, and has been taken over a bit by spiders, carpenter ants, carpenter bees, and has seen other adventures along the way.

Due to local government stipulations, a new shop with the exact same footprint is being built a few feet away, but this time with a few tricks up its sleeve to make it all worthwhile. I'll start the next reply with a bit more history, and the third post will get everything up to date with progress on the new shop at the time this thread is created.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 08:49 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2017, 01:40 PM »
Started woodworking in 2010 or so, and started really working on turning this shed into a shop in early 2011 I think. It's a cheaply built shed, 12x12 feet exterior dimensions. A shallow pitch gable roof, and the interior and exterior was clad in 1/4" ply everywhere. I was told the previous owner used it as a beer drinking spot, and although there is an exterior light installed and wiring, no power was available to it.

I did pretty well turning into a shop, as cramped as it is. Started out small with a router table and a table saw. I eventually tore down most of the interior walls (and the boards underneath used to back the ply) and replaced with 7/16" OSB for storage and stability. Never got to one corner though. Ceiling came down and got to use some of the rafters as storage, although my original intent was to figure out just what was going on with the power. If there was power run, it wasn't there any longer. Maybe one day I'll find a buried cable with a misplaced shoveling attempt. I ran my shop first by one, then two extension cords which limited just what tools and accessories I could run. It was also freezing in the winter and boiling hot in the summer.

Even with these limitations it became a shop that could handle most anything I chose. I even completed my biggest projects to date, two dining tables - one for myself, one for a friend that turned into a commission. I added heat and air conditioning, and overhead lights. I even added a computer, a TV, and a digital assistant. Cramped, but it was a great spot to hang out and occasionally accomplish things.

A couple years ago though, the diverter on the roof came undone and started causing issues. First was a leak into the shop, which thankfully was easily fixed. But then the bottom of the exterior started rotting, thanks to how unlevel the shed had become. As the rot progressed further, and the level of the shop was never going to be addressed, and for many other reasons, I became serious about replacing it.

IMG_0683 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Unfortunately, due to zoning regulations it would have cost a fortune to build a larger shop on my property. If you do that, then you say why not permanent power as well. Even just building a foot bigger than I was would cost $1000 before I got started in survey costs. I just couldn't justify the cost. But what I could do what go up a bit, and perhaps choose a roof that allowed for more storage space at least. My dream of a bigger shop with permanent electricity and HVAC and plumbing is on indefinite hold, but at least I can have a shop that the little things I deal with now are addressed. Like my router table drawers not staying closed. Or having to use a multitude of extension strips. Or having to kill spiders and ants all the time. And my favorite, having room for a true dust extraction system.

So, after years of putting up with what I did, on July 1 I set out to build a shop that will survive my needs while we are at this property.

IMG_20150501_1955187883-1024x576 by Cochese H, on Flickr
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 02:29 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 01:41 PM »
I had actually set out almost two years ago to build a new shop, but something had gotten in my way: the earth. We live on a granite outcropping, and there are stones and boulders everywhere. My plan to sink piers was not going to work without dynamite or heavy machinery. So I gave up for then and tried to make do. With the shop threatening to fall down however, I was forced to think about things again. This time, it would be sleepers instead of piers. Why not concrete? My property is not level at any point, and using a prepared site would again force me to spend that $1000 before I got started. It was going to be sleepers, or nothing at all.

For full disclosure, I am required no permits or any supervision to take on a building under 200 square feet. I cannot build a bigger shop in suitable locations on my property due to setback rules. So it is a 144 square foot shop located about seven feet off two property lines. I am building this to the standard I think it should be, where no real building code exists for what I am doing. The shop will be sold as is or can be torn down when we move.

I bought shovels and a mattock, and went to work. This is what I found:

IMG_0682 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Thankfully, the mattock was just the right tool for the job and it went fairly well. This is the sleeper pit that is lowest on the hill. I probably should have gone for the highest, but I know better now. The tamper came out and compacted both the dirt and the 3/4 stone down to make a solid bed for the sleeper to sit in.

IMG_0685 by Cochese H, on Flickr

The middle sleeper pit actually had the most rocks in it, and the high pit was actually softer surface dirt. I'd say the middle pit was the most time consuming.

IMG_0693 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then it came time to level everything, and I went with the string method and a piece of survey equipment I was gifted. If you guessed my error in an earlier picture, you know that I was never going to be level without either raising up the sleepers on the lower side or digging out a bunch of ground. With the granite just below, I went with going up.

IMG_0706 by Cochese H, on Flickr

I went with solid concrete blocks to raise the low side up and get everything level. It required a single layer in the middle, and two and three on the low side. I secured those together with construction adhesive. The pic above shows me having to slightly adjust the middle sleeper pit to get the floor joist to sit flush.

Now, it's entirely possible I've set myself up for catastrophic failure using these concrete blocks. After all, they are what were used to put me in the situation I am in now. However I think I've done the ground work properly this time, used the right materials, done the right prep, used better materials and techniques than they did before. What's done is done at this point, criticism is fine just be nice about it. It's not changing at this point and hopefully you'll never have the opportunity to say I told you so.

The sleepers are 6x6 PT beams, and the floor joists are 2x6 PT. Here, the floor joists are done. When I installed the plywood (again, PT) subfloor I realized the noggins/stretchers were in the wrong places. That was fixed to provide better contact and support points for how the panels were installed.

IMG_0711 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Due to expense, I wasn't planning on insulating the floor, but found a fantastic deal on some R-19 perforated batts and ended up insulating the floor for about $50. Then the 3/4" PT plywood went on top and I found myself at a stopping point.

IMG_0715 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0716 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0718 by Cochese H, on Flickr

It was then time to go on a family vacation, so the project sat for awhile until this past weekend when I started on the roof. When I realized I would have to keep the same footprint, I decided pretty quickly that I would at least gain some more storage space above my head. So, I settled on a gambrel or barn-style roof. If I went to the allowed height, I could gain almost enough room in the attic to stand up - a great place to put a dust extractor, a compressor, store materials...I wouldn't grow any on the main floor, but I could put a few more things upstairs and gain some practical room. It was an easy decision, but harder to pull off. Gambrel calculations are a bit tricky, but there is some online calculators that help.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

First thing to do was to cut the gussets. I built an outdoor assembly/track saw table a few weeks prior, and used it here along with my homemade parallel guides to cross cut the gussets. Unable to go narrow enough to cut them to final size, I cut in doubles and did a final rip at the table saw.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then a stop block on the miter saw to cut them in half.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

I made all the angles and lengths on the gambrel roof equal to save errors, so I needed to cut a 135° peak on the gussets. Thankfully my miter saw could do the 22.5° cut I needed and that saved a lot of time. Cut, flip, cut, done.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Was able to go from bringing it home to done with the gussets in just a couple hours.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr

Then it was time to cut the 2x4s for the rafters. This was a little bit of trial and error at first, but thankfully only one board was spoiled and I got all ten rafter assemblies complete and ready for the next phase (pictured is five, at the end of the day). The outside overhang will be done later.

Untitled by Cochese H, on Flickr


This week I am brushing up on wall framing, as much as I can brush up never having done it before. I'm pretty confident, just need to select my doors and windows and account for the rough framing for those until I can buy them. Hoping to have at least a wall assembled by the end of this coming weekend.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 02:26 PM by Cochese »

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two (shop replacement thread)
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 10:00 AM »
Made three window headers last night. Only planning on two windows for now, but only took a couple more minutes and a couple more dollars to make and install should I choose to put in. May even go with three from the jump, who knows.

IMG_0816 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop - Phases One and Two (shop replacement thread)
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2017, 08:48 PM »
Walls are beginning to appear.

IMG_0820 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0821 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Got about half donw with the opposing wall before the rains came.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2017, 10:27 PM »
Walls (at least the structure) are complete.

IMG_0826 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2017, 05:35 PM »
Screwed up the order a bit in which I did this, I should have sheathed the walls first, but there you go. The end rafter will be done like that.

IMG_0829 by Cochese H, on Flickr


Offline Bob D.

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2017, 09:51 PM »
You're making progress. Should be closed in before long.

Is that one of Lee's SharkGuards I see on your table saw?
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 09:43 AM »
You're making progress. Should be closed in before long.

Is that one of Lee's SharkGuards I see on your table saw?

Yes, I was made aware of him when I owned the Craftsman version of the Ryobi BT3 table saw. Think I bought this one in 2011 or so, and ordered the riving knife for the new saw and switched it over. Excited for the new shop to be done so I can have proper dust collection to see how that works.

I should be buying the sheathing this week, at least in a part order. Going with Zip as it's supposed to be rated for six months unprotected.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 09:59 PM »
Beginning the dry-in process.

IMG_0833 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline neilc

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2017, 01:12 AM »
You're making great progress.  Looks like a near identical building in the yard behind your home.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2017, 12:41 PM »
You're making great progress.  Looks like a near identical building in the yard behind your home.

Thanks. I think his is a 10x10 prefab with a partial loft (or maybe none at all). The neighbors to the back left have also built a building in our shared corner, their's is more of a styled one, and have no idea what they are using it for.

The tape on this system is a breeze, and I'll finish up shortly. Then I need to figure out how to put the end panels up.

IMG_0835 by Cochese H, on Flickr

IMG_0837 by Cochese H, on Flickr

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2017, 06:04 PM »
Well kids, I guess the lesson here is to not try and start sheathing when a hurricane is coming. In my defense, it wasn't coming here, it was going up the coast when I started on the sixth.

So, I was in a bit of a rush to try and get this thing buttoned up sufficiently. There were a few moments when I went into full panic mode. Like when I was up on an extension ladder by myself at 10pm on Sunday trying to get the flashing tape up - until I ran out a few minutes later.

I figured out that I couldn't put the roof up without having the attic floor in, so that was my first task.



This is what my old shop is, from the attic. The ground level is about the same between the two, so you can see I'm already well higher than I ever was.



Yeah, I got this up there myself. Working out is paying off.



Got the end panel up with the first run of sheathing. Here is my first mistake of the weekend, I meant to stagger the panels.



Fast forward to about 3pm on Sunday. I was so busy Saturday and Sunday that I didn't stop for pictures. This is with half the roof done.



I still had three large panels and six smaller panels to fill in at about 7pm last night. This was my panic moment. I got the roof panels up, but the fits aren't great (truthfully they aren't great all around the roof) so we'll see how this flashing tape holds up. I tried to save money by making the most use of the panels, but in the end mistakes led to probably the same amount and a worse fit in places. As such, I'll end up using felt on the roof anyway, and I actually may contract that out. I don't really have a suitable ladder for the terrain, and that's pretty high up for someone that is less than enthused about heights. Too many rocks and such on the ground for me to escape serious injury.

I'm just waiting for Irma to pass through tomorrow so I can see how badly my roof leaks, because like I said I ran out of tape. I hit the couple of big gaps with, you guessed it, duck tape. We'll see if it's at all of any use. The attic is almost completely floored in with a small space where I can get up on a ladder. It's OSB though, and hopefully it doesn't do too much damage before I can get some more tape up there (has to be a dry surface to adhere).



I spent far too much money in a short time frame, and I am physically broken. I have the get up and go of an 80-year old today.


Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2017, 10:41 PM »
Spent the first part of the week catching my breath and getting some more tape up on the roof. No rain since then, I'm kinda anxious for that to happen and pass that test.

Updates from the last couple of days. Getting some simple doors going.



Frame for the doors. 2x6 on the lock side.



Dominos with screws acting as temp clamps.



Hinges are designed not to back out.



LP Smartside in redwood pattern. This is the hardest wall, because I'm trying to get the doors to line up with the other panels.



Got the locks in, but it's not yet secure. Need to put a stem lock at top and bottom of the right door and mortise the locks on that door too.



Unlike my current shop, these doors stay open. Tells me everything is nice and level. Inside of the doors will be rigid foam and something to put over that as well for storage.

This weekend: finish the doors and windows go in.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2017, 08:47 PM »
Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.






Offline bkharman

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2017, 09:44 AM »
Looking nice mate!  I am a big fan of zip walls. Make the process so easy (albeit not cheapish). Look like the last hurricane didn’t impact too much, and hope the same for Maria.

Nice digs!

Cheers. Bryan.


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People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2017, 10:03 AM »
Thanks. Irma wasn't really a big thing on the north side of Atlanta thankfully, just rain that came through the gaps on the roof when I ran out of tape. I'm actually wanting it to rain soon so I can test the tape. The side I did tape did leak through slightly, so I added another layer overlapping and paid more attention to rolling.

It's very surreal to see it standing in the backyard after years of hoping it would happen.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2017, 07:01 PM »
I have partial power now. Plus I framed out my attic stairs.




(TV/PC outlet)


The math for the attic stairs was going well until I realized the angle was going to be variable. Then I just winged it.


Starting the overhead circuit run.


Lights in the shop now are controlled by a power strip. Now I have an actual switch.


Drop down stairs framed out.


Going with plug-in lights at least at first, three banks evenly spaced.


Inlets came today, testing all the outlets and switch.


These are the only ways power comes in, so using an inlet here is safe.


In-use cover protects from the elements.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2017, 07:06 PM »
ROCK IT DUDE!  Major milestone.  And keep posting progress picts.  Gives us motivation and inspiration.  And I might add, at no cost to us  [big grin].

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2017, 07:10 PM »
ROCK IT DUDE!  Major milestone.  And keep posting progress picts.  Gives us motivation and inspiration.  And I might add, at no cost to us  [big grin].

Peter

Thanks man, means a lot.

I also started helping out my son's soccer coach a couple weeks ago, after we had been losing 8-1 and 7-1. I volunteered to take on the defense.

It was a 1-1 tie today. I'm just as proud of that. It was a good day.

Offline mike_aa

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2017, 09:00 PM »
This is so cool!  I can't wait to see the progress now that it's buttoned in!

Thanks for sharing!

Mike A.

Offline DB10

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2017, 11:34 PM »
 Hats off to you, considering all the crap weather you guy's have been having of late, you have done well to get the build this far, now your work has moved to the inside I'm sure it will be a lot easier and more pleasurable going forward and finishing the project.

Offline neilc

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2017, 11:56 PM »
Great progress.  Codes that allow romex make it so easy for wiring.  Here in Chicago everything has to be conduit.

Thanks for the photos and congrats on getting it closed in with no issues from Irma.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2017, 04:11 PM by neilc »

Offline TSO Products

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2017, 10:37 AM »
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans
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Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE Guide Rail Squares -  the MTR-18 Triangle and Work Holding solutions

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2017, 12:03 PM »
Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2017, 09:42 PM »
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans

I wish you hadn't asked me about the budget. I was doing extremely well keeping track of everything right up until the Hurricane weekend. Went from just under $900 spent to over $1700 spent, best I can figure. Now that things are settled down I can keep better track. Still a number of huge expenses coming up, like putting down a decent looking floor, roofing, insulation, interior and exterior walls, etc. I'm guessing I'll end up spending somewhere in the 4-5k range, which is still quite a bit cheaper than I would have gotten by buying.

Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Buried electrical was never really in the cards. That adds the expense of having it run and hooked up, plus surveying for a permanent foundation, and then if you've spent that much you might as well spend more to expand it. $15k wasn't really something I wanted to put in this house. Not after an $8k window bill.

I'll probably do one run of electrical up in the attic to handle the dust extractor, air compressor, a light, and maybe a spare outlet to sharpen tools with the grinder. Haven't decided on that last part yet.

The doors turned out better than I expected. The composite siding is pretty stiff, and using the Dominos I assume helped as well. I still need to do some minor sanding with the belt to keep things from sticking in one spot. Very happy thus far, and there will be some sort of weatherstripping. Will just depend on what I need out of it. There will also be some rigid foam and something on the back to allow for some light storage.

Suicide cables? Braver than I am. These are some Journeyman Pro jobs I got off of Amazon and used the Hubbell housing and deep metal box.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2017, 09:48 PM by Cochese »

Offline TSO Products

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2017, 09:51 PM »
- you're getting a lot of utility for a one time outlay of around $ 5k plus the satisfaction that the job is done "your way". - thanks for sharing.
Hans
@Cochese  - what an inspiring thread! Shows what is possible on a modest scale, one step at a time.
Perhaps some members, considering a similar project,  would be interested in knowing the budget.
I've bookmarked it to see it as you finish it.
Great post!
Hans

I wish you hadn't asked me about the budget. I was doing extremely well keeping track of everything right up until the Hurricane weekend. Went from just under $900 spent to over $1700 spent, best I can figure. Now that things are settled down I can keep better track. Still a number of huge expenses coming up, like putting down a decent looking floor, roofing, insulation, interior and exterior walls, etc. I'm guessing I'll end up spending somewhere in the 4-5k range, which is still quite a bit cheaper than I would have gotten by buying.

Windows, door locks, and starting my power runs.

While watching football no less... [thumbs up]

First off...nice job! It's coming together bit by bit.  [big grin]  Looking good.

Some questions:
Did you give up on buried electrical?

I assume you'll also run some electrical in the attic?

Do those doors flex or are they pretty stiff? Do they stay coplanar across the door opening?

Will there be some form of weather stripping on the doors? Both door-to-door and door-to-floor?

I didn't know those Hubbell power inlets were even available. Had I known, I wouldn't have needed to fabricate these.  [eek]

Buried electrical was never really in the cards. That adds the expense of having it run and hooked up, plus surveying for a permanent foundation, and then if you've spent that much you might as well spend more to expand it. $15k wasn't really something I wanted to put in this house. Not after an $8k window bill.

I'll probably do one run of electrical up in the attic to handle the dust extractor, air compressor, a light, and maybe a spare outlet to sharpen tools with the grinder. Haven't decided on that last part yet.

The doors turned out better than I expected. The composite siding is pretty stiff, and using the Dominos I assume helped as well. I still need to do some minor sanding with the belt to keep things from sticking in one spot. Very happy thus far, and there will be some sort of weatherstripping. Will just depend on what I need out of it. There will also be some rigid foam and something on the back to allow for some light storage.

Suicide cables? Braver than I am. These are some Journeyman Pro jobs I got off of Amazon and used the Hubbell housing and deep metal box.

TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE Guide Rail Squares -  the MTR-18 Triangle and Work Holding solutions

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2017, 10:10 PM »
Suicide cables? Braver than I am.

Suicide cables...now that’s funny. It’s one way to get the job done, however...I prefer your approach.

Offline duginsky

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2017, 06:23 PM »
I have partial power now. Plus I framed out my attic stairs.




(TV/PC outlet)


The math for the attic stairs was going well until I realized the angle was going to be variable. Then I just winged it.


Starting the overhead circuit run.


Lights in the shop now are controlled by a power strip. Now I have an actual switch.


Drop down stairs framed out.


Going with plug-in lights at least at first, three banks evenly spaced.


Inlets came today, testing all the outlets and switch.


These are the only ways power comes in, so using an inlet here is safe.


In-use cover protects from the elements.


I am doing a nearly identical set-up and am grateful for your postings. Would you be able to share a phot of how you wired the inlet on the inside of the build and also mind telling me which wire you used for all of the outlest/lights? Are you running an extension cord to the inlet - and if so, how many amps do you plan to supply to the building? Thanks agin for sharing this. It is really nice to follow along.

Regards,
Casey

Offline Mikeoutrage

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2017, 09:06 PM »
I would suggest rustoleum epoxyshield for the floor. I did my 24x32 t&g floor with it two years ago and it still looks great. Paint and glue comes off wet or dry easily. Best thing my wife talked me into. I did fill all holes and joints then belt sanded the whole floor. I do have hairline cracks on the joints but my shop is not conditioned.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #30 on: September 26, 2017, 09:55 AM »
The wiring is Romex 12/2. Wiring the inlet is extremely simple, just shove the wires in and tighten the poles. The back marks where neutral and ground insert. The new shop will run on two extension cords just like the old one does, on 15A breakers. Haven't really had any issues to this point, we'll see if the internal wiring is an improvement or a detriment over more extension cords and power strips in  the old shop.

Think I'm going with peel and stick laminate, I found one at either Lowes or HD that doesn't require underlay and has a deep texture to help with sawdust.

Offline duginsky

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #31 on: September 26, 2017, 03:18 PM »
Thanks for the information - and for sharing.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2017, 10:18 AM »
It's a slow week.


Other inlet box in, but not hooked up yet.


Down to the last two outlets on the ground floor.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2017, 10:28 AM »
Progress!  Are you planning to cover the inside walls and perhaps insulate?

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2017, 11:08 AM »
Progress!  Are you planning to cover the inside walls and perhaps insulate?

Peter

Yes. I went window shopping for insulation, wall covering, flooring and lighting yesterday. I think I've settled on options for everything except the walls.

Offline bkharman

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2017, 06:27 PM »
Progress!  Are you planning to cover the inside walls and perhaps insulate?

Peter

Yes. I went window shopping for insulation, wall covering, flooring and lighting yesterday. I think I've settled on options for everything except the walls.

I have been installing Roxul safe-n-sound in my shop and sometimes their ComfortBat product. Really nice products. If you can afford it and need to buy in bulk, at HD you can get a contractor pack for 30 bucks for about 56 sq feet.

It really is good stuff and not itchy!

Cheers. Bryan.


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People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #36 on: September 30, 2017, 11:39 PM »

Cut out my attic hole.


Won an IG giveaway, this is serving as my light for the time being.


It's bright enough to light the whole bottom floor. 8200 lumens.


Electrical done. It not being even is going to bug me. From L->R: lights, dust extractor outlet, air compressor outlet


Upstairs. T->B: Always hot, air compressor, dust extractor


Did some cleaning.


Five sheets of sanded 1/2" ply


Cut in half.


Ripped to 6" strips.


Floor going down.


Two edges left to do. Some gaps, but overall happy.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #37 on: October 01, 2017, 06:54 AM »
"It not being even is going to bug me"

Now is the time to fix it then before the walls are closed in.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #38 on: October 01, 2017, 09:55 AM »
Looking good... [thumbs up]  curious why you used 6" wide strips for the attic floor?  Just easier to get through the attic opening?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #39 on: October 01, 2017, 10:03 AM »
Looking good... [thumbs up]  curious why you used 6" wide strips for the attic floor?  Just easier to get through the attic opening?

Not the attic floor. That’s 3/4” osb sheets. I went with this because I wanted a plank-look floor, but with a bit more utility and a lower cost.

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #40 on: October 01, 2017, 10:49 AM »
Not the attic floor. That’s 3/4” osb sheets. I went with this because I wanted a plank-look floor, but with a bit more utility and a lower cost.

Ok...now I got it  [embarassed]   [doh]

Offline John1102

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #41 on: October 01, 2017, 01:49 PM »
Looking forward to seeing it after the tools move in and the layout.  Great job!

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #42 on: October 01, 2017, 08:45 PM »

All electrical done.


First tool moved in. Needed to sand the floor.


The floor is done. One coat of matte poly, two at the door.

Onto the next step, likely insulation and interior walls.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #43 on: October 07, 2017, 10:02 PM »
Decent little update.

As much as I like my task light I won, I need permanent lighting. Went with 40w 5000K 4000lm lights off Amazon. Going to add one or two more banks when the ceiling goes in.






Just the two provides a ton of light.

Bought some insulation this morning, this should cover the entire first floor.



Fairly easy to put up with a sharp knife.




I didn't forget to protect my wires.



Left wall done.


Putting the wall panels up are much harder. Drilled into this outlet, plus electrocuted myself on another.



Took some effort to get the holes just right, but I like the result. Panel is a bit thinner than the OSB I have in the old shop though.



Tomorrow the goal is to have five more panels up. Rain is finally coming as well, so my roof will get another test.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #44 on: October 08, 2017, 10:33 PM »
We got rain from Irma. We got rain from Nate today. In the four weeks in-between, nothing. So, I had both been looking forward and dreading today.

My roof still has a couple of minor leaks. Very minor, considering the amount of rain. A cup or small bucket would work until I get the shingles on. What was more concerning was rain coming through the door and through the windows.




I thought the flashing was bad over the windows, but it turns out it was because I hadn't installed a drip edge on the roof yet. I tried a temp solution, and it slowed it down a good bit. This is happening on both windows near the door. The door itself suffers from no overhang, and I hadn't installed a Z-channel yet. I did get that in while it was raining, but I need to install the siding above it and use a little bit of glue somewhere.

These are minor things, but need to be addressed before the next rain comes. I need to start bidding on the roof, see how much that is going to cost. One of the side effects of all this is my floor is a mess. I'll have to do some serious work on it to clear up the mud and dirt. Maybe I should have put down ram board or something. Maybe I still will.

The goal for today was to get up five panels. Accomplished. Plus some more cavities filled. No outlets were harmed in the making of these walls.



Oversize outlets because I can't measure.



Panel too short because I can't measure. This will be hidden by cabinets though.


Left wall.


Back wall.


Right wall.


Door wall.

Offline RJNeal

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #45 on: October 08, 2017, 11:43 PM »
Cochese, thanks for spending the time to document your build. I have read off a on, on your progress. This morning I read this tread from the beginning.
Nice workmanship. I like your floor idea.
Rick.
Have you walked your saw today?

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #46 on: October 09, 2017, 08:09 AM »

As much as I like my task light I won, I need permanent lighting. Went with 40w 5000K 4000lm lights off Amazon. Going to add one or two more banks when the ceiling goes in.



Just curious, do you think those LED's put out more light than standard fluorescent lights?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #47 on: October 09, 2017, 08:49 AM »
I suppose it depends on the bulb. I know there are fluorescent bulbs that have more lumens, but I like the look of the LEDs.

Offline RKA

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #48 on: October 09, 2017, 09:30 AM »
@Cheese
I only have experience with sub-$40 twin lamp 4 ft fixtures, but the conventional T8 fixtures never seem as bright as the lumen ratings might suggest.  And that's on day 1, the decay on fluorescents really kills their output over time.  The HO (high output) fluorescents are considerable brighter initially, but suffer the same decay.  I have a pair of 6 bulb T8 fluorescents in my garage that must have less than 5000 hours on them.  These were Sylvania 5K tubes purchased.  I would ballpark the light drop from new around 30-50%, it's that significant.  In cold weather it's worse initially as the tubes need 5-10 mins to warm up before reaching full brightness.

Sam's club sells some Lights on America LED's which I've been using (about $30 ea.), which I love and would recommend (been using them for a year).  If you have a low ceiling, don't commit to placement until you can experiment with spacing.  The light throw is much more directional than a fluorescent.  But the light that reaches your work surface is significantly brighter than the non-HO T8's right out of the box.  Now that LED prices have come down, I won't be buying any more fluorescent fixtures.
-Raj

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #49 on: October 10, 2017, 02:31 AM »
@Cheese
I only have experience with sub-$40 twin lamp 4 ft fixtures, but the conventional T8 fixtures never seem as bright as the lumen ratings might suggest.  And that's on day 1, the decay on fluorescents really kills their output over time.  The HO (high output) fluorescents are considerable brighter initially, but suffer the same decay.  I have a pair of 6 bulb T8 fluorescents in my garage that must have less than 5000 hours on them.  These were Sylvania 5K tubes purchased.  I would ballpark the light drop from new around 30-50%, it's that significant.  In cold weather it's worse initially as the tubes need 5-10 mins to warm up before reaching full brightness.

Sam's club sells some Lights on America LED's which I've been using (about $30 ea.), which I love and would recommend (been using them for a year).  If you have a low ceiling, don't commit to placement until you can experiment with spacing.  The light throw is much more directional than a fluorescent.  But the light that reaches your work surface is significantly brighter than the non-HO T8's right out of the box.  Now that LED prices have come down, I won't be buying any more fluorescent fixtures.

Thanks 🙏  for the feedback..I have several 8 ft T12’s and 4 ft T12’s that I’d like to convert to LED’s   I was completely unaware that I was this far behind current fluorescent technology. It sounds like most of the T12 bulbs have been considered personna non grata by the feds.

I’ll need to start the investigative process to figure things out...thanks again.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 02:34 AM by Cheese »

Offline Bob D.

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #50 on: October 10, 2017, 07:46 AM »
I dumped all my cold start fluorescents and switches to LEDs last year.
Huge difference in the amount of light and I cut my electric use at the
same time. I got some fixtures from Lowes that are 3800 lumens each
and draw 48 watts. My old fixtures were 64 watts each.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2017, 10:00 AM »
Great thread, I love your diligence. Similar projects take me several years to actually complete...

Just my 2 centavos on the lights - in my own small shop I grabbed (2) 24 by 48 LED panels from Global and they are incredible. Zero shadows in a 10' by 12' area.

Keep up the good work!

RMW

As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #52 on: October 11, 2017, 08:40 PM »
Thanks Richard.

Spoiler: the walls are pretty much done.


When I installed the last bit of insulation.


Down to the last two full panels.


All that's left to do. Rip down some of the scrap I have left over and pin it up.


I was ambitious and moved these myself. It was very interesting when the bandsaw fell on top of me. But look, I can plug into the wall like a normal person!


Little MFT clamp rack is the first thing up on the wall besides the electronics.


The jointer was fairly easy to bring over.


Current state of the old shop. May start bringing that left wall over next.

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #53 on: October 13, 2017, 09:43 PM »
Between yesterday and today the transition is pretty much done. Just sussing out details about where things will be and what storage I need to build based on the higher ceiling and different layout.

I wouldn't trade my little systainer storage for anything. But it's friggin heavy and needs to be rebuilt because I don't need that open space behind the closest drawer bank.



Had to get creative moving it over (everything moved over has been done completely by myself). Used the hand truck as a fake human and did a reverse wheelbarrow.

[

This is what that cutout was hiding.



Next the planer and cart came over.



I was most worried about the workbench. I set up some scrap to drag it over.



Woodworking al fresco. Easy part is over, because I have no ramp on the new shop.



In its new layout. Finally have full access again, the old layout blocked the tail vise.



Table saw moved over. This wasn't too bad either.



Unfortunately the support brace on the saw is the exact height as the pork chop. Might have to build a base and drop it down an inch. This jointer takes up way too much room, it's not well designed.



After I moved the router table and miter saw over. The RT was a massive pain in the butt because of the independent wheels and sloping hill.



Plane till moved over, which I hope to replace with a full hand tool cabinet soon. Probably going with the Fine Woodworking design.



Lots of little things for awhile, probably not too exciting. May pick up my new dust extractor soon if I can find a coupon. Need to see if I have enough amps to run it.

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #54 on: October 16, 2017, 10:06 AM »
I need to build the new clamp rack, bring those over, install the right side of the miter saw station and the air compressor. Otherwise, the shop is operational right now.

Some people may think having a TV and a computer in the shop is dumb, but it's important to me and they are in the best spot they've ever been.



For the first time in my life I was able to use a level to install something on a wall in the shop.



Hand tool corner is done until the cabinet is built.



Quite a bit of the design for the shop was based on this purchase. Been waiting five years.



Still have a gap in the attic (need to buy another full sheet of OSB), so I ran this temp expandable hose down for tool usage. Can reach anywhere in the shop.



Don't get anywhere near a plastic bag, hose connector, or anything less than about two pounds or you'll need to go upstairs and retrieve it. If you sucked up a screw, you'll hear it.



While I was testing the dust extraction I made a simple little shelf for my free Chromebox to sit on behind the monitor. Pocket screw installation.



Attic just not quite tall enough, but this will be fine for now. Will work on a custom mount including two stage separation later.



Full tour coming soon.

Offline RJNeal

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #55 on: October 16, 2017, 01:00 PM »
Looks like you need a cupola.
Nice looking shop.
Enjoy.
Rick
Have you walked your saw today?

Online Cheese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #56 on: October 16, 2017, 01:25 PM »
Looking good...impressed with the amount of light and the spread of the light from those LED's.

Just a thought...would substituting a paper element for the bag on the DC unit give you the headroom you need?

Offline Cochese

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #57 on: October 16, 2017, 02:01 PM »
Looking good...impressed with the amount of light and the spread of the light from those LED's.

Just a thought...would substituting a paper element for the bag on the DC unit give you the headroom you need?

That's the goal long-term. As for now it seems to expel all the air it needs to through the filter, so it shouldn't pose any harm. I plan on going with some sort of setup similar maybe to what did with theirs. Have to see what I can do with the room I have, but I'll be sticking with 4" for everything, not 6" like they did. I just don't have the need. Or I may just buy a short Wynn filter that will fit the headroom.

It's such a huge upgrade as it is. It sucked up one of my 2.5" adapters, thankfully it got stuck right at the nozzle.

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #58 on: October 20, 2017, 07:30 PM »
We're at the small updates stage, just getting things organized and into a semblance of their final positions.

My old clamp rack took up over five feet of linear wall space. This one less than three, and holds more.











Not going to bother installing the AC until spring, but this guy is already getting some work. Even with the ceiling and attic insulation to go, and the gap between the roof and wall to be addressed, this little guy warms things up quickly. Insulating the floor was a smart move.



Until I re-imagine the miter saw station and upper cabinets, this will do for storage.



Temp install of the air cleaner. Will move more toward the middle once I do a final decide on lighting amounts.


Offline jobsworth

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #59 on: October 22, 2017, 02:17 PM »
Cochese my brotha,

Just checked this thread out, man you did a heck of a job with that shop.  I like using the T-111 panels for the interior walls.I was thinking of doing the same, I have a dumb question, why didnt you paint the panels white? I was going to inorder to brighten the shop up with the white walls being able to reflect the light and brighten it up.

I just found out about those LEDs replacing the Fluorescents. I found out about them on a recent trip to Oregon. I have enough light in my shop already but when I start replacing them Ill be definately going with the LEDs.

Well done mate very nice job [not worthy]
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #60 on: October 22, 2017, 02:36 PM »
Cochese my brotha,

Just checked this thread out, man you did a heck of a job with that shop.  I like using the T-111 panels for the interior walls.I was thinking of doing the same, I have a dumb question, why didnt you paint the panels white? I was going to inorder to brighten the shop up with the white walls being able to reflect the light and brighten it up.

I just found out about those LEDs replacing the Fluorescents. I found out about them on a recent trip to Oregon. I have enough light in my shop already but when I start replacing them Ill be definately going with the LEDs.

Well done mate very nice job [not worthy]

Thanks. I may paint the walls something at some point, but even just the two lights right now are so bright and throw enough light that I haven't felt the need. It might actually border on too much light when I add another pair. That's truly how bright it is in there. That one pic of the hand plane till from October 13 was taken before dawn. It's like turning on the sun when just these two fixtures come on. They are 4100 lumens each.

Offline jobsworth

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #61 on: October 23, 2017, 09:35 AM »
Wow, Now got me going out and spending more $$$$......

My shop is lit up pretty good. But that doesn't mean I cant use more light .
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #62 on: October 23, 2017, 09:39 AM »
Wow, Now got me going out and spending more $$$$......

My shop is lit up pretty good. But that doesn't mean I cant use more light .

Here's the link, the description says 4k lumen, but the box says 4100. Either way it works.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0725D24X2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Offline jobsworth

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #63 on: October 23, 2017, 09:58 PM »
 [thanks]
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #64 on: October 25, 2017, 12:20 PM »
Almost everything is moved over at this point. Still some little things to sort out, plus some things still to go structurally like more insulation, a ceiling, stairs, external wall panels and the roof. A little shop tour of what is what so far.


Hose reel installed at a reasonable spot. 50', so it will cover anything on both floors and a good ways outside of the shop too.


Temporarily have a drain setup with this hose and a ball valve so I don't have to go upstairs often.


The last bit of wall to be put up is hiding behind my rails. I need to get the long rail, and I have no idea where it will go when I do.



Clockwise around the shop from the entrance. My clamp corner with new rack, fire extinguisher and first aid box, switches for the lights, dust extractor, and air compressor (both upstairs). A Harbor Freight (w/ Powermatic riser) bandsaw and Ridgid drill press serve me well for now.



MFT that will get a syscart at some point for more storage, my CT Midi, and my streaming TV and Chrome OS computer/monitor.



Holtzapffel-style bench made of fir with some horrible storage underneath. That finish cabinet up above I'm not happy with the location.



Left side of my miter station. I think this will get a comprehensive redo at some point. Or maybe pieces of it. Ladder for temporary access upstairs.



Hitachi C12RSH (sprayer of dust), I wouldn't mind putting a Kapex in here for accuracy and dust at some point. There is a Dewalt 735 below that in a flip cart, and a Triton 3HP in the router table.



Delta 36-725 for the saw, good except for dust collection. Old Craftsman 6-1/4" jointer I found on Craigslist, and my OSS and HCM. Harbor Freight DC and HF compressor upstairs.



Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #65 on: October 25, 2017, 12:43 PM »
@Cochese looking good, and just in time for winter. I need to get a streaming video setup out in the shop myself, thanks for reminding me. 2 suggestions FWIW:

1. Find some way to extend a deck out from the double doors, even if it's only 5-6', @ the same floor height. Takes advantage of the double door & a huge improvement in good weather to be able to roll stuff outside and expand the shop's working area:



2: French cleats french cleats french cleats. Don't like the position of the cabinet, just move it. 'Nuff said.

Hope you enjoy the fruits of your labor.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Cochese

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    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #66 on: October 25, 2017, 02:10 PM »
Wife and I discussed a deck about a month ago. I'm not sure when it will come about, it may have to be after the old shop comes down, depending on how big she wants it. It will be multi-purpose, can be used for cutting down sheet goods or lounging around with a fire pit.

Not too terribly concerned with french cleats at the moment. Used them extensively in the old shop, have pretty much planned everything out here. The finish cabinet is just something that is slightly out of proper proportion to use where I want it, but I may do so anyway.

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #67 on: November 01, 2017, 07:28 PM »
Put the first piece of trim up and a drip cap to control water coming through the top of the door.




Ceiling insulation.




Something important to me in this new shop was having full access to my workbench for the first time since shortly after I built it. I was able to bring this in the shop and set it up without having to move multiple tools unlike before.


Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #68 on: November 10, 2017, 10:12 PM »
Time to put the ceiling in. 5mm plywood underlayment (light, and looks really good for being this cheap).





Six of nine panels in, I can now finally put in the ladder.



Wide, and a heavy weight rating so I can get stuff in and out.






Because I had a feeling the outswing would hit either my miter saw wall or the MFT, I chose the MFT and I was right. At least I can move this, and it just means I have a reason to make an MFT syscart now.



The ceiling is complete except for trim at this point, particularly around the outside where the panels don't have anything to nail into. Bit disappointed that the ladder door doesn't line up exactly with the opening, but I may fit that down the road.

Next up: dust ducts.




Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #69 on: November 11, 2017, 10:38 PM »
Decided on sewer PVC vs 30ga duct, and it started to get installed today.


45 to 45 jogs around the ceiling joists.


Nothing is permanently installed except the long sweep 90 to the pipe below.


Testing...


The miter saw branch. Might also be used for the overarm table saw collection. Some expensive plastic here.


Except for some foil tape, the upper part on this side is done so the filter could go back up.

Offline HarveyWildes

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #70 on: November 11, 2017, 11:47 PM »
Did you do anything to prevent static electricity build-up in the PVC?

This is an interesting thread - I'm following it although I think this is the first comment.

Offline JBag09

  • Posts: 178
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #71 on: November 12, 2017, 07:45 AM »
This is looking great. Looking forward to seeing your progress.
Speaking of lights, I ordered these a couple weeks ago for my new shop, tried one in my current shop tonsee how bright they really are, and Wow! Thank you Sams club



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #72 on: November 12, 2017, 08:31 AM »
Did you do anything to prevent static electricity build-up in the PVC?

This is an interesting thread - I'm following it although I think this is the first comment.

My research on it said it was basically a placebo in a hobbyist-size shop.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #73 on: November 12, 2017, 08:35 AM »
"Nothing is permanently installed except the long sweep 90 to the pipe below."

A pair of 45s would have less flow restriction and less chance of something getting
caught at the bend.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #74 on: November 12, 2017, 08:53 AM »
"Nothing is permanently installed except the long sweep 90 to the pipe below."

A pair of 45s would have less flow restriction and less chance of something getting
caught at the bend.

The sweep is almost exactly the same as the two 45s I tested. At least with the height I was working with.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2017, 08:58 AM by Cochese »

Online RobBob

  • Posts: 1181
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #75 on: November 12, 2017, 09:25 AM »
This is looking great. Looking forward to seeing your progress.
Speaking of lights, I ordered these a couple weeks ago for my new shop, tried one in my current shop tonsee how bright they really are, and Wow! Thank you Sams club



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That's good to hear.  I bought those same lights for my garage based shop, but have not installed them yet.

Offline JBag09

  • Posts: 178
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #76 on: November 12, 2017, 10:27 AM »
This is looking great. Looking forward to seeing your progress.
Speaking of lights, I ordered these a couple weeks ago for my new shop, tried one in my current shop tonsee how bright they really are, and Wow! Thank you Sams club



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That's good to hear.  I bought those same lights for my garage based shop, but have not installed them yet.
I have not installed them either, I took one out of the box, plugged it in and held it up. It made the rest of the garage looked dark almost. I’ll let you know how 18 of these lights do hopefully sooner than later


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Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #77 on: November 12, 2017, 09:42 PM »
This is the first bit of cold since I got the ceiling insulation all taken care of, so I was interested to see what the heat loss was overnight. It got down to about 45F, so not fantastic but not horrible either. Will be very interested to see what happens this winter, particularly after the attic insulation and exterior panels and shingles get on. May buy one of those attic ladder tents too.



PVC trick I picked up.


Decided to change up the main branch a little for better efficiency and to save a few bucks.





This is the tedious part. I'm so close to making sawdust but instead I'm making PVC shards.

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #78 on: November 18, 2017, 11:14 PM »
More progress on the dust collection.







More progress on the attic insulation.




Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: The 144 Workshop 2 - A New shop from scratch
« Reply #79 on: November 24, 2017, 11:53 PM »
Insulating the doors, getting the last things in place, and finally upgrading from my cordless trim router.