Author Topic: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.  (Read 7099 times)

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Offline gstuartw

  • Posts: 66
The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« on: May 11, 2015, 06:34 PM »
My shop is 20 x 30, not large by some stand alone shop standards but generous compared to those relegated to sharing the two car garage with a car or two. Having said that I'm trying to squeeze every thing I can into the space which is my dream shop long overdue. Placing things on wheels and rolling them into use and then back out of the way will of course help me include all the must-haves in my shop.

What is perplexing me is my MFT(s). I do have a table saw in addition to the MFT so the MFT will be used primarily for it's holding, clamping abilities and then at times for cross cutting those things that won't fit in my table saw cross cut sled.

On a whim and following my drooling over pictures here on FOG of dual MFT setups I pulled the trigger and bought a second MFT planning on building a double table with drawers and cabinets beneath. So now I have one in the middle of my shop and another in a box unopened. My question is will a dual MFT table such as this function well as an assembly table? What about a workbench? Are these MFT's stout enough for the pounding, loading etc that most workbenches take? If I'm going to dedicate such a large section of floor space I don't want to find that I also need another table in addition to the dual MFTs.

(PS one idea is to build the dual MFT and have a torsion top that can be put on top when the "dead flat" surface for assembly is needed. Otherwise the top could be stored out of the way). Thoughts?

Thanks,

Stuart

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3789
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2015, 08:38 AM »
Take a look at Jerry Work's shop and look through the Shop Tour.  He must have 5-6 MFTs.
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5975
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2015, 08:47 AM »
I have 8 MFT 3's. 5 stay set up in the shop (800 sq. ft.), I have connectors, but leave them stand alone. Allows me to configure as needs arise. The other 3 travel with me in truck or trailers.

Tom

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3789
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2015, 09:16 AM »
I have 8 MFT 3's. 5 stay set up in the shop (800 sq. ft.), I have connectors, but leave them stand alone. Allows me to configure as needs arise. The other 3 travel with me in truck or trailers.

Tom

Wish I had a shop big enough to use a bunch more MFTs.  I can easily see using seven of them in my ideal shop.
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5726
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2015, 02:31 AM »
I got 2 reg MFT and 1 Kapex MFT when Imget back to the states, I'm gonna either get me another reg MFT or build one . The main concern I have is maintaining the 900mm height.mthe rest is gravy

Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2015, 04:48 AM »
Hi guys sorry to jack the thread but have question regarding the MFT3, can the MFT take the place of the traditional woodworking bench? I was thinking of making a roubo style bench but as I'm tight on space (single car garage)was thinking the MFT may be the way to go as a lot of my work is site based and only really make things for the home etc in the garage so would have a mobile bench I could use for both and can fold away when not in use. my question is how stable is the MFT when using handtools I.e. Hand cutting dovetails etc?
Lots of the green stuff :))

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 924
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2015, 05:27 AM »
@Mbconstructionjoinery

As long as you can brace the MFT against something like a wall then it will be fine for planning otherwise it is too light and unstable. The extra cross braces on the legs help a lot but not really enough for hard or knotty timber. For chiselling its a bit bouncy but you can always put a substantial lump of timber on top.

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3040
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2015, 06:47 AM »
Hi guys sorry to jack the thread but have question regarding the MFT3, can the MFT take the place of the traditional woodworking bench? I was thinking of making a roubo style bench but as I'm tight on space (single car garage)was thinking the MFT may be the way to go as a lot of my work is site based and only really make things for the home etc in the garage so would have a mobile bench I could use for both and can fold away when not in use. my question is how stable is the MFT when using handtools I.e. Hand cutting dovetails etc?

In a pinch you can make it work in the short-term, but it can never be a proper substitute for a traditional bench. Not enough mass for chisel work, and too unstable for sawing or planing.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5726
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2015, 02:22 AM »
Hi guys sorry to jack the thread but have question regarding the MFT3, can the MFT take the place of the traditional woodworking bench? I was thinking of making a roubo style bench but as I'm tight on space (single car garage)was thinking the MFT may be the way to go as a lot of my work is site based and only really make things for the home etc in the garage so would have a mobile bench I could use for both and can fold away when not in use. my question is how stable is the MFT when using handtools I.e. Hand cutting dovetails etc?


It's all I've been using for a couple of years now. I guess it depends on what type of work your doing

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3711
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2015, 04:09 AM »
I have mentioned on several other threads that I think the MFT s stable enough for light hand planing.  I have been getting more and more into hand planing and chiseling (wood chiseling that is  ::)) lately and i have changed my tune somewhat.  When I really need to hog out a face on a board, i just need something a LOT MORE substantial.  I am learning to put a lot better edge on my hand tools, but that is not enough. An MFT is fine for working with hand tools that are battery or electric driven, but a plane, to do serious work needs a solid base to work against.  As mentioned above, chiseling does get bouncy when working over an MFT.  Even a solid block of wood to work on does not seem adequate.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Slartibartfass

  • Posts: 1052
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Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2015, 05:48 PM »
1 car garage converted to workshop.

I used up all availabe space to put stuff everywhere.

Double MFT/3 connected on short side.

Gladiator Garageworks system including 3x 8 ft long workbenches forming an L.

Use one of the movable gladiator (underbench) storage carts for my anvil and other stuff. Wouldn't use the MFT/3 to sledgehammer stuff.... Perfect for cutting and assembly.

Get rid of the tablesaw if space is a concern (keep if you have enough space for convenience).

Still need to squeeze a wooden band saw and a jointer/planer combo in there.... Not sure how at this point....





As NOTIFICATIONS still don't work I might not see any replys.... (Sucks big time....)

Offline abgoto

  • Posts: 85
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2015, 07:52 PM »
... my question is how stable is the MFT when using handtools I.e. Hand cutting dovetails etc?

I remember reading a post from birdhunter where he linked two MFT/3 and added a pair of Shop Fox bench legs and a vice.  It looked plenty stable for hand tool work.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5726
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2015, 10:39 AM »
1 car garage converted to workshop.

I used up all availabe space to put stuff everywhere.

Double MFT/3 connected on short side.

Gladiator Garageworks system including 3x 8 ft long workbenches forming an L.

Use one of the movable gladiator (underbench) storage carts for my anvil and other stuff. Wouldn't use the MFT/3 to sledgehammer stuff.... Perfect for cutting and assembly.

Get rid of the tablesaw if space is a concern (keep if you have enough space for convenience).

Still need to squeeze a wooden band saw and a jointer/planer combo in there.... Not sure how at this point....

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

As NOTIFICATIONS still don't work I might not see any replys.... (Sucks big time....)


Food your gonna have to design my shop set up. Yeah gotta a lot of stuff in that small space. Mines is incredibly unorganized

Offline Slartibartfass

  • Posts: 1052
  • How'ur'duin'......
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Re: The MFT and incorporating it into my shop.
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2015, 10:43 AM »
looking forward to talking about it face to face....