Author Topic: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo  (Read 2545 times)

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Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1039
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« on: November 15, 2017, 05:48 PM »
I do like and regularly use my MFT but there really is nothing like a Roubo workbench.  I built it for hand tool use but find myself using it more with my Festools.  The top is great for sanding, router work and even assembly but because the legs are flush with the bench top, the sides make an excellent clamping surface too.  Here I am clamping a new door for the house to mortise for hinges and knobset.  It is rock solid.




Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 777
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 05:57 PM »
That's some good shop p0rn man. 

I've long wanted to build the Ruobo but I'm just not enough of a hand tool guy (in my mind I am though).  Are there any changes you'd make to yours to better mate it with Festool/power tool work?  I've always dreamt of that hybrid Ruobo that handles tracksaw work as well as it does a smoothing plane.

Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1039
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 06:06 PM »
I wouldn't change a thing in terms of gearing it more towards Festool.  Jameel's design is as near to perfect as could be.  Of course, if I built it today, I would use the new "crisscross" chop vise.  I still might add some more holdfast holes, that is a very handy clamp and easy enough to drill some more holes.
What sets it apart from any other bench I've seen or used, is how stout it is.  When sanding on the tail vise, there is no vibration whatsoever.  Same with hammering on it, no feedback "buzz" of any kind. 

Benchcrafted Crisscross Vise

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 777
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 06:54 PM »
I wouldn't change a thing in terms of gearing it more towards Festool.  Jameel's design is as near to perfect as could be.  Of course, if I built it today, I would use the new "crisscross" chop vise.  I still might add some more holdfast holes, that is a very handy clamp and easy enough to drill some more holes.
What sets it apart from any other bench I've seen or used, is how stout it is.  When sanding on the tail vise, there is no vibration whatsoever.  Same with hammering on it, no feedback "buzz" of any kind. 

Benchcrafted Crisscross Vise

Yeah...I've only been drooling over the Benchcrafted hardware for like 5 years now.  Still can't justify the build at the moment - limited space and we may move in the near future.  But I'm always happy to hear positive comments on the design for more than hand tool work.
Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline harry_

  • Posts: 1174
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 06:58 PM »
What bench? I don't see no stinkin bench!  [poke]
Disclaimer: This post is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental. Void where prohibited. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. Contents may settle during shipment. Use only as directed. No other warranty expressed or implied. This is not an offer to sell securities. May be too intense for some viewers. No user-serviceable parts inside. Subject to change without notice. One size fits all (very poorly).

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2470
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2017, 12:28 AM »
Awesome bench!! I too have a nice workbench with a 24 inch vice up front - my trouble is I usually have it stacked with clutter making it not usable. I think the front vice on yours is a great option.

Did you make the door?

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1039
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: The Ultimate MFT: Roubo
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2017, 07:35 AM »
I did not.   Home Depot special.  It's for my son's bedroom door.  We live in an old farmhouse and one of the raised panels had split on it.  I removed it when he first left for college with the intentions of removing and replacing all 4 raised panels with new ones.  That was 6 years ago!  Now, he's coming home for Christmas with his new girlfriend so Momma said I better get going and this was a quick fix.




« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 10:38 AM by Jim Kirkpatrick »