Author Topic: Glue For Ipe  (Read 37694 times)

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Offline Dave Askew

  • Posts: 113
Glue For Ipe
« on: May 14, 2013, 01:27 AM »
Hey Guys/Girls,

Just looking for some feedback from personal experiences on your preferred method of gluing up Ipe miters.

Right now I use West Bend Epoxy, wipe down joints with acetone etc, and I'm pleased with the results, but just seems like a long work time for in the field when it's not convenient, or easy to clamp up.

Any and all feedback will be greatly appreciated !!

Dave

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Offline NERemodeling

  • Posts: 608
    • New England Remodeling, LLC
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2013, 01:46 AM »
Hey Dave,

sounds like you are doing the right thing,

no personal experiance, just some research from a project that never came to.   what i found was exactly what you are doing..   if i remember correctly the oils in Ipe make it a difficult wood to glue.   

any way to make a mechanical connection? 
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Offline Dave Askew

  • Posts: 113
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2013, 02:06 AM »
Yeah, the West Bend does work great and I've had very very limited failure, but I got into a "friendly debate" at the lumber yard this morning with some guys about this subject. My stance was Domino's and West Bend = Best Way  ;D  There stance was TB 3 or Gorilla Glue !! Now bear in mind, these are the same guys who first came to me with questions on Ipe installation etc etc, and I know they don't do a whole lot of it, so I'm taking there word with a large grain of salt !!

However, that being said, if people have had success with TB 3 or Gorilla Glue, I'd be open to making a change !!

And your right, wiping the joints prior to gluing is critical, even with West Bend !! I learnt that the hard way  [doh]

Dave

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2373
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2013, 08:54 AM »
Haven't worked with ipe yet, but have worked with other tropical woods, some of which are also oily. I think you could make some test miter joints with the Titebond3 and leave them out to see how they survive. I don't see much of an advantage of using a Poly Glue over what you're already doing with West Bend. You'd also have that foam to deal with, AND the need to wet the joint with water as Poly needs moisture to get the curing to move along.
 If you could see the results of those 'other' guys work months or several years after they're done, you might find out that you're still tops in ipe info and installation, but just take longer to get through a job using epoxy.
 Success has its own rewards, as they say.. [wink]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline CharlesWilson

  • Posts: 458
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2013, 11:18 AM »
I have glued bloodwood with Titebond 2, as recommended by the manufacturer (wiping down both surfaces with acetone until the red color stops appearing on the wipes) with less than spectacular results.

Regluing with Epoxy was much more successful. The manufacturer does not, as I remember, recommend TB3 for tropical woods.

Charles
Charles Wilson

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2013, 11:40 AM »
Funny, I just started a thread along this line of questioning on another forum, so I'll cut and paste what I wrote there here rather than start a new thread on this issue.




I am going to be building various things over the next few months for outdoors. Two new entrances and gates for the backyard, some planters, a deck with a pergola and railings for around the deck, and a host of other things as needed. I've been looking solely at what LV has to offer insofar as glues for these projects and would prefer to deal with them, but this is not mandatory should a best solution present itself otherwise.

I know that Titebond III has a high water resistance but it only has a 10 minute open time. I'd also read somewhere a year or two ago that it is better to use epoxy for outdoor use, but there was no real reason for this other than a generalized statement as such in a thread I read on the FOG. Besides, according to Marty McClave at LV with wnom I spoke to this morning, he says that currently they are not allowed to sell TB3 in Canada as there is some kind of regulatory issue with the labelling that has come up.

The woods I am planning on using will be PT lumber, cedar, and Ipe, which is a South American hardwood, primarily from Brazil which has become more commonly available the last few years in Canada.

Using this chart from LV that has that shows the different characteristics of each of their glues, I had narrowed down my search to G2 Epoxy or The West System although I 'm not sure which one in the West System I should opt for between the #205 and #206.  (The description from the LV product page for each product is in italics)

* LV Glue Characteristics Chart.pdf (83.75 kB - downloaded 558 times.)


G2 (2:1 ratio) is formulated to work well on oily and acidic woods (do not use below 10°C/50°F; cure time is 48 hours at 10°C/50°F or 24 hours at 20°C/70°F). Ideal where flexibility is required. The joint will yawn rather than fracture.


The G2 seems to work especially good with oily and acidic woods. While I would characterize cedar as an oily, I have no clue about the Ipe's characteristics other than it is 10 times harder than maple.

(BTW, what does "Yawn" mean???)


In regards tot he West System The West System is supposedly the gold standard with epoxies.



West System is the industry standard epoxy for high-strength waterproof adhesives.

The #105 epoxy resin is mixed in a 5:1 ratio with the #205 and #206 hardeners, and a 3:1 ratio with the #207 hardener to form a high-strength solid with excellent moisture resistance.


The #205 fast-cure hardener has a working time of about 60 to 70 minutes at 20°C/70°F with a minimum cure temperature of 4°C/40°F. The #206 slow-cure hardener has a longer working time of 90 to 110 minutes at 20°C/70°F with a minimum cure temperature of 16°C/60°F.


The #207 special coating hardener was developed for coating and fiberglass cloth application where an exceptionally clear, moisture-resistant, natural wood finish is desired. The 105/207 mixture resists clouding in humid conditions and has a low blush formation. Three coats or more can be applied in one day without additional surface preparation. The #207 working time is 110 to 130 minutes at 20°C/70°F with a minimum cure temperature of 16°C/60°F.


The curing time for maximum strength is 1-4 days for #205 and #206 hardeners, and 4-7 days for the #207.


The 5:1 kits contain 32 fl oz (946ml of resin and 7 fl oz (207ml) of hardener, and the 3:1 kit contains 32 fl oz (946ml) of resin and 10.6 fl oz (310ml) of hardener. Kits include three dispensing pumps and a 30-page manual. Components are also available individually.


I definitely think that the #207 is not what I'm looking for since it talks about its use in Fiberglass, which I have no plans on using anywhere. But where all of them mention their minimum cure temperature, does that mean I should not use it where during the cure period it can be going to a temperature below that minimum for risk that it will never cure properly, or will all that simply mean if during the curing period, that it simply takes longer to cure?


Then I was pointed to by Marty at LV to the System Three product "Cold Cure". He said it was easier to use than the West System, is not as pricey, and has a lower cure temperature.


The most versatile of our epoxy systems, Cold Cure is a waterproof structural bonding agent and penetrating sealer. It will cure at temperatures down to 2°C/35°F, even under water. Cure time varies with temperature; at 20°C/70°F it is 24 hours.

A low-viscosity epoxy with good wettability. It can be used on wood, metal, plastic, porous or non-porous surfaces, as an adhesive, sealer or laminating resin. A two-part system, 2:1 ratio.



I've never used epoxy for project glue ups, so any advice is greatly appreciated.



I know there is also Gorilla Glue. I've used it before, and I'm not sure it should be a candidate at all. It is messy to deal with, but are epoxies for my applications just as messy???


This polyurethane adhesive is ideal for joining dissimilar materials (such as metal or plastic to wood) or difficult exotic woods. It has an open time of 15 minutes, sands without clogging and absorbs solvent-based stains very well. Squeeze-out is easily removed, leaving an inconspicuous and waterproof glue line.
A minimum moisture level is required for curing; if wood has less than 10% moisture content, water must be brushed on one side of the joint. A versatile glue ideal for outdoor projects, for assembling wooden pen kits or for use on curved laminations, it has an opened shelf life of about a year.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 11:50 AM by Kevin D. »
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Offline JayStPeter

  • Posts: 401
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013, 12:06 PM »
It's not Ipe, but I used both Poly and West system on some Sapele when I built this http://www.woodcentral.com/shots/shot868.shtml.

I used the poly for just about everything, with the exception of the main mortise and tennon joints, which I epoxied.  It's holding up well.  I don't think I used Gorilla brand, but probably the Elmers version.  I hate Gorilla because their bottles suck and the stuff dries out in about a week, even when I put the little red Lee Valley bottle condoms over the cap.  When i do use it (because it's easy to find) I buy it in the little mini bottles and just figure on tossing them every couple days and opening a new one.  I did wipe down the surface prior to glueing with regular ole paint thinner I think.
Jay St. Peter

Offline Dave Askew

  • Posts: 113
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2013, 12:49 AM »
Haven't worked with ipe yet, but have worked with other tropical woods, some of which are also oily. I think you could make some test miter joints with the Titebond3 and leave them out to see how they survive. I don't see much of an advantage of using a Poly Glue over what you're already doing with West Bend. You'd also have that foam to deal with, AND the need to wet the joint with water as Poly needs moisture to get the curing to move along.
 If you could see the results of those 'other' guys work months or several years after they're done, you might find out that you're still tops in ipe info and installation, but just take longer to get through a job using epoxy.
 Success has its own rewards, as they say.. [wink]

I did some glue ups tonight....3 total...one with TB 111, one with Gorilla Poly and one with TB 11....I'll leave those puppy's to endure the elements and see what I get !! I know the West Bend works, so these test samples will be interesting !!


Offline Chuck Kiser

  • Posts: 150
  • Carpenter in the Desert
    • Knollwood Construction Company
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2013, 06:02 AM »
Great timing for this thread. Just yesterday I talked at length with the Tech. Dept. at West Systems about gluing IPE in marine environments. Their suggestion was the Gflex 655 pre-thickened epoxy product. They stated it was developed for oily hardwoods due to the increase in their use in boatbuilding. Wiping the joint first and a quick sanding with the grain prior to application gave good results.
Life is too short for bad wine or cheap tools.

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Offline WarnerConstCo.

  • Posts: 4184
    • Warner Mill Works
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2013, 08:27 PM »
West systems Six10 when I need structural integrity.

Tite Bond 3 for all other glue joints on SA lumber.

I will wipe the joint with acetone before I glue.

The Six10 is the bomb.

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2013, 09:37 PM »
I didn't see your purpose for the design i.e. weather or not this is an outdoor application or not.  I have used epoxy for teak and rosewood using acetone cleaning before hand.  For indoor furniture the recommendations from Titebond were Titebond 2 extend or Titebond 3 depending on the needed open assembly time.

I did some crude experiment with rosewood comparing System 3 epoxy vs Titebond 3 for shear strength and the Titebond had the better result in joint line fracture.

Jack

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2013, 10:13 PM »
I've never had to wipe anything with acetone before gluing, so I have to ask.  If doing Domino joinery for outdoor use, do you use a brush and slobber the acetone into the mortice before gluing up? 

I assume the SIPO's don't need this treatment as well.  Or are you guys using standard beech Domino's when using epoxy for outdoor applications?

And what are the oily woods that need this?  Ipe of course, but what about cedar?
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Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2373
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2013, 10:19 PM »
I've never had to wipe anything with acetone before gluing, so I have to ask.  If doing Domino joinery for outdoor use, do you use a brush and slobber the acetone into the mortice before gluing up? 

I assume the SIPO's don't need this treatment as well.  Or are you guys using standard beech Domino's when using epoxy for outdoor applications?

And what are the oily woods that need this?  Ipe of course, but what about cedar?
. I only worry about oily woods that might interfere with a good glue connection. Cedar isn't one that worries me.
I use Sipo Tenons for exterior work. In the past, 'before life with a Domino', I used plain biscuit joints and type 2 or 3 glue with generally good success for what it's worth on a fair amount of Cedar work.


Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2013, 12:03 AM »
I use acetone with a lint free rag to wipe the oily wood until I don't see any color of the oils on the rag.  I quickly glue or epoxy the joint after acetone cleaning of the oils before the oils bled out again.

Jack

Offline Dave Askew

  • Posts: 113
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2013, 12:27 AM »
West systems Six10 when I need structural integrity.

Tite Bond 3 for all other glue joints on SA lumber.

I will wipe the joint with acetone before I glue.

The Six10 is the bomb.

That Six 10 looks awesome...didn't even know it existed !! Just ordered me some

Thanks Man

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2013, 11:09 AM »
I just spent a good hour on the phone this morning with Tom at West System explaining I want to build a fence and a gate largely using Domino SIPO joinery, and he strongly recommended using the G Flex 650 product rather than the more commonly available 105-20X type epoxies they make.  He said due to seasonal wood movement, the regular epoxy only offers 4% elongation, whereas the G Flex offers 32% elongation.  That's the route I will be taking on this project, and he also confirmed that I should not just be using it for my PT project, but for my future uses with IPE as part of my deck accessories.  

Nice thing about it also is it does not require the pumps as it is a 50/50 mix.

FWIW.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 11:12 AM by Kevin D. »
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Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2013, 06:47 PM »
I just spent a good hour on the phone this morning with Tom at West System explaining I want to build a fence and a gate largely using Domino SIPO joinery, and he strongly recommended using the G Flex 650 product rather than the more commonly available 105-20X type epoxies they make.  He said due to seasonal wood movement, the regular epoxy only offers 4% elongation, whereas the G Flex offers 32% elongation.  That's the route I will be taking on this project, and he also confirmed that I should not just be using it for my PT project, but for my future uses with IPE as part of my deck accessories.  

Nice thing about it also is it does not require the pumps as it is a 50/50 mix.

FWIW.

Kevin,

Did you talk to the West System folks about how tight a domino joint is as far as retaining enough epoxy at the adhesion line?  When I cut a joint in IPE type woods and install the Sipo tenon it is a very tight interface and I am wondering if enough epoxy is left in the joint for proper joint strength?

Jack

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2013, 08:01 PM »
I just spent a good hour on the phone this morning with Tom at West System explaining I want to build a fence and a gate largely using Domino SIPO joinery, and he strongly recommended using the G Flex 650 product rather than the more commonly available 105-20X type epoxies they make.  He said due to seasonal wood movement, the regular epoxy only offers 4% elongation, whereas the G Flex offers 32% elongation.  That's the route I will be taking on this project, and he also confirmed that I should not just be using it for my PT project, but for my future uses with IPE as part of my deck accessories.  

Nice thing about it also is it does not require the pumps as it is a 50/50 mix.

FWIW.

Kevin,

Did you talk to the West System folks about how tight a domino joint is as far as retaining enough epoxy at the adhesion line?  When I cut a joint in IPE type woods and install the Sipo tenon it is a very tight interface and I am wondering if enough epoxy is left in the joint for proper joint strength?

Jack


I had briefly thought of that when talking to the fellow, but never did ask about it.  I think I'll call them back at some point and ask.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2013, 08:17 PM »
I just spent a good hour on the phone this morning with Tom at West System explaining I want to build a fence and a gate largely using Domino SIPO joinery, and he strongly recommended using the G Flex 650 product rather than the more commonly available 105-20X type epoxies they make.  He said due to seasonal wood movement, the regular epoxy only offers 4% elongation, whereas the G Flex offers 32% elongation.  That's the route I will be taking on this project, and he also confirmed that I should not just be using it for my PT project, but for my future uses with IPE as part of my deck accessories.  

Nice thing about it also is it does not require the pumps as it is a 50/50 mix.

FWIW.

Kevin,

Did you talk to the West System folks about how tight a domino joint is as far as retaining enough epoxy at the adhesion line?  When I cut a joint in IPE type woods and install the Sipo tenon it is a very tight interface and I am wondering if enough epoxy is left in the joint for proper joint strength?

Jack


I had briefly thought of that when talking to the fellow, but never did ask about it.  I think I'll call them back at some point and ask.

I had spoken to one of the epoxy manufactures a long time ago when building a large rosewood conference table but, I can't find my notes on ideal interface thickness.  I think I will also call them in the morning since I'm about to build another rosewood table using my XL 700 for the leg to apron joints with Sipo tenons.

Jack

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2013, 03:48 PM »
I spoke with Tom from West Systems to day and he confirmed that as long as you wet both the mortise wall and the tenon cheeks, a tight joint won't be a problem.  He suggested that you might want to apply the G/flex and let it absorb into the surface roughness a while before assembling the joint.

I drove over to my local West Marine store and purchased the G/Flex epoxy kit this morning and as soon as the heat wave cools down a bit I'll let you know how it works.

Jack

Offline greymann

  • Posts: 88
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2013, 04:51 PM »
Thanks to everyone for all the great research and discussion, especially Kevin and Jack.  This topic came just in time for me.  I just finished a standalone Ipe deck at my house and am about to put the Ipe skirt around it.  I just ordered the G/flex and am really looking forward to finishing the project.

Also a while ago there was a thread on fasteners for Ipe.  I chose the Tiger Claw TS4 and found two things.  I love the finished look but the process was a real PITA and probably took two or three times as long as other less attractive methods.  I can see why an installer would hate these things.

Dick
"But for the sky, there are no fences facing."

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 975
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2013, 05:22 PM »
Thanks to everyone for all the great research and discussion, especially Kevin and Jack.  This topic came just in time for me.  I just finished a standalone Ipe deck at my house and am about to put the Ipe skirt around it.  I just ordered the G/flex and am really looking forward to finishing the project.

Also a while ago there was a thread on fasteners for Ipe.  I chose the Tiger Claw TS4 and found two things.  I love the finished look but the process was a real PITA and probably took two or three times as long as other less attractive methods.  I can see why an installer would hate these things.

Dick

What was the dillema with those fasteners, and why did you not go with what I had found to be the best one it seems in the IpeClip?

http://www.ipeclip.com/

Did you have a board straightening apparatus, and/or was that part of the problem of not using one would you say?

http://www.ipeclip.com/deck-tool/hardwood-wrench.html

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Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2013, 09:50 PM »
One other thing that I learned from West Systems was that they wipe the glue joint with alcohol instead of acetone before applying the G/flex.

I also bought another container of alcohol with my G/flex for the current project and will try it out when the dang temperature gets below 100 degrees!

Offline greymann

  • Posts: 88
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2013, 10:57 AM »
Kevin,

Most of the decisions I made followed from the selection of Ipe I had here in Asheville.  The only slotted Ipe I found locally was 6 inch.  For a 10x16 deck, I liked the 3.5 inch look much better and it was not available preslotted and I didn't want to cut the slots especially for the dust that would create.  Of the choices for unslotted  fasteners, I chose the Tiger Claw. 

I found that I needed two straighteners and chose the Pony Board Boss for that.  The reason I needed two of them was that I often started a board in the middle to minimize the amount of board bending I would have to do.  I used 10 foot boards so the only cutting I had to do was to trim at the ends.  Then came the clamps.  Most people only talk about the bend in the boards and not the warp that is often there as well.  I wound up using an F-clamp on each joist and had to reposition each one as I fastened each side of the board.  That's why it took so much longer than putting down a PT deck with a bowrench and top screwing.

For me it was worth it but I can't see how an installer could keep from losing their shirt using these on a job.

Dick

"But for the sky, there are no fences facing."

Offline Misterbee

  • Posts: 2
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2013, 03:32 AM »
This is a very timely topic for me, as I am about to do my first Ipe/Domino project. I have used both before, but never together. It's for a piece of outdoor furniture, so like everyone else, I am looking at the west system. I just ran across this, and I am wondering if anyone has tried it? http://www.glueoakandteak.com/


Offline greymann

  • Posts: 88
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2013, 06:27 AM »
The ad seemed to me to have too many buzz words and hype and not enough content.  Go West young man.

Dick
"But for the sky, there are no fences facing."

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2013, 08:36 PM »
I tried the West Systems G/Flex epoxy yesterday and it flows a lot better than the System Three T88 epoxy that I purchased from Woodcraft.

I'll do some strength tests later this week after I get my new Furnace/Air Conditioning System installed in the house.

Jack

Offline PMA

  • Posts: 2
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2013, 11:05 PM »
I just finished assembling a small end table in Ipe.  Left over bits from a deck.  I started glue up about 6 months ago with titebond2  without wipe down with anything other than a  tach cloth to remove dust and lost interest, due to a move and onslaught of work due to Hurricane Sandy  Did zero research as I was just killing time with this project.  It has 3 3/4x5" boards with biscuits  as a top, a square center leg with four pieces mitered and hollow center  and doubled up 3/4 feet.   Individually the pieces held up bouncing from spot to spot and a month floating in my van.  Ended up as a gift to my mother on mothers day.  No technical answer here but I am pleased with how its held up thus far.  No failures yet

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #28 on: June 15, 2013, 08:07 PM »
I just finished assembling a small end table in Ipe.  Left over bits from a deck.  I started glue up about 6 months ago with titebond2  without wipe down with anything other than a  tach cloth to remove dust and lost interest, due to a move and onslaught of work due to Hurricane Sandy  Did zero research as I was just killing time with this project.  It has 3 3/4x5" boards with biscuits  as a top, a square center leg with four pieces mitered and hollow center  and doubled up 3/4 feet.   Individually the pieces held up bouncing from spot to spot and a month floating in my van.  Ended up as a gift to my mother on mothers day.  No technical answer here but I am pleased with how its held up thus far.  No failures yet

Titebond 2 is what was recommended to me from the Titebond tech. staff and I used it to edge glue my rosewood table top without any problems.  However, I figure the Domino mortise and tenon joints between the legs and aprons will get much more racking stresses and the G/Flex seems like a good idea.  Time will tell is I "guessed correctly".

Jack

Offline Misterbee

  • Posts: 2
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2014, 12:20 AM »
This is a very timely topic for me, as I am about to do my first Ipe/Domino project. I have used both before, but never together. It's for a piece of outdoor furniture, so like everyone else, I am looking at the west system. I just ran across this, and I am wondering if anyone has tried it? http://www.glueoakandteak.com/



Just a follow up to reort that the stuff was easy to work with, and six months later, the daybed I made out of Ipe and Dominos is sitting in my back yard, solid as a rock.

Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #30 on: February 12, 2014, 10:13 AM »
Sir get you some liquid epoxy you can find this online. Also get some powdered glue. Mix the two together 1 part epoxy to 2 parts glue dust.  This will do the trick for you., it worked well for me with ipe outdoor dining table. Their is a video on YouTube about this mixture. I think it can be stored up to six months after mixed.i will look for the video and put a link here when I find it, if you want something easier try gorilla glue the foamy kind.

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Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2381
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #31 on: February 12, 2014, 05:17 PM »
Sir get you some liquid epoxy you can find this online. Also get some powdered glue. Mix the two together 1 part epoxy to 2 parts glue dust.  This will do the trick for you., it worked well for me with ipe outdoor dining table. Their is a video on YouTube about this mixture. I think it can be stored up to six months after mixed.i will look for the video and put a link here when I find it, if you want something easier try gorilla glue the foamy kind.

I find your epoxy/dry glue intriguing and will give it a try but, I avoid gorilla glue and use Titebond II extend or Titebond III

I did some small experiments on oily woods Titebond III vs West Systems Epoxy and while not scientific, I always had wood fiber failure with Titebond whereas with Epoxy the joint failed at the interface.

Jack

Jack

Offline David Gage

  • Posts: 13
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #32 on: March 17, 2014, 04:44 PM »
I was just researching the gluing of Ipe and came across a recommendation for Tropical Hardwood Epoxy glue.  I will likely order a small amount for a few outdoor projects this summer.

http://www.smithandcompany.org/TropicalHardwoodEpoxy/

Question if I use the Domino though to butt joint two long boards.  Should I use the Domino with the tight setting on one side/board and the slightly looser mortise on the adjoining board?  Thanks.

David

Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1919
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #33 on: March 17, 2014, 05:05 PM »
I was just researching the gluing of Ipe and came across a recommendation for Tropical Hardwood Epoxy glue.  I will likely order a small amount for a few outdoor projects this summer.

http://www.smithandcompany.org/TropicalHardwoodEpoxy/

Question if I use the Domino though to butt joint two long boards.  Should I use the Domino with the tight setting on one side/board and the slightly looser mortise on the adjoining board?  Thanks.

David

I try to keep the joints at the narrow settings on all mortices if I can. My logic: Less room for water ingress if the domino and glue fill the mortice. This means careful marking but I genreally just mark both boards at the same time without moving the setup. I have done at least five dominoes with the tight setting and have had no problem. I always dry fit to make sure though, at least when I use more than two. I do about 75% of my cuts by just lining up on a pencil mark on each board. YMMV
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline w802h

  • Posts: 225
Re: Glue For Ipe
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2014, 08:52 PM »
Although more plunges offer the opportunity for more error, I've had good success using the tight fit for one side and a double plunge on either side of a pencil mark on the other.  This gives a pretty tight mortise with just enough forgiveness to make things easy.