Author Topic: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw  (Read 92243 times)

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Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
In the effort of learning the full capabilities of my new TS 55 REQ I'm curious about how to do some things I would naturally default to the table saw for. Cutting panels is fairly straight forward but a big question is ripping a pile of face frame or other smaller strips from a bunch of boards. Normally I'd just set the table saw fence and start running boards, but I'm curious how to efficiently do the same with the new track saw. I want to set it and forget it, set a guide of some sort and get busy cutting strips that range from 4 inches all the way down to 1/4".

I'm curious how you all would accomplish this with your track saws? How would you cut 40 strips of 1/4" from a board with your track saw? Are there ready made jigs for this or do you fab things up as needed? Thanks for any input helping me to grow into a track saw frame of mind.
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Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2914
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2013, 11:57 AM »
I use the Parallel Guides for this purpose and when calibrated to the saw, you can be surprisingly accurate...remember, you need the extension set in order to cut small rips and it references off of the right side of the material.  The PGs without the extension is for wider rips. 

Scot

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2013, 12:15 PM »
I use the Parallel Guides for this purpose and when calibrated to the saw, you can be surprisingly accurate...remember, you need the extension set in order to cut small rips and it references off of the right side of the material.  The PGs without the extension is for wider rips. 

Scot

Are those made with inch increments?
+1

Offline erock

  • Posts: 1254
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2013, 12:18 PM »
The Festool Parellel guides use mm's for measurements.


Eric

Offline NuggyBuggy

  • Posts: 419
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 12:18 PM »
Are those made with inch increments?
The guides are marked out in mm.
“I am on a drug. It’s called Charlie Sheen.”

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2013, 12:24 PM »
Does Festool know we use inches in the US? [/sarcasm]

They'd sell more stuff if they honored our system here in the US. Converting metric all the time is about as fun as a colonoscopy. I've had this issue with EU manufacturers in other industries, those who adapt to the US do better.
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Offline Luis (ridgenj)

  • Posts: 117
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2013, 12:32 PM »
Yes, it is like asking us to drive in the left side of the road.
Cheers
Luis

Offline ifit

  • Posts: 228
Re: Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2013, 12:37 PM »
If America could send us ply to conform to our metric system we might return the favour, until then your stuck with mm ;)

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2013, 12:39 PM »
+1

Offline erock

  • Posts: 1254
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2013, 12:42 PM »
when I bought the parallel guides I decided to convert over  and measure in millimeters.

my brother-in-law thought I was funny for doing that.

so I asked him how fast he could add 100 plus 25 plus 5.

then I asked him to add  1-3/8 plus  5/8 plus 1/4.

obviously it took him a little longer to add the fractions.



I may be wrong but I think the United States is the only country that does not use the metric system.

Eric


Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2013, 01:01 PM »
when I bought the parallel guides I decided to convert over  and measure in millimeters.

my brother-in-law thought I was funny for doing that.

so I asked him how fast he could add 100 plus 25 plus 5.

then I asked him to add  1-3/8 plus  5/8 plus 1/4.

obviously it took him a little longer to add the fractions.



I may be wrong but I think the United States is the only country that does not use the metric system.

Eric



My point wasn't to debate the merits of either system, but rather the merit of offering a product for sale in the country with the #1 world economy with the measuring system used in that country.

I have worked in the printing industry for many years and a French company that was expanding to the US was trying to get me to try their ink, I asked for a couple quarts to test their product and the salesman asked me what is a quart? I suggested he figure it out and call me back when he's ready to sell me ink, never heard from him or the company again.
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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2013, 01:54 PM »
when I bought the parallel guides I decided to convert over  and measure in millimeters.

my brother-in-law thought I was funny for doing that.

so I asked him how fast he could add 100 plus 25 plus 5.

then I asked him to add  1-3/8 plus  5/8 plus 1/4.

obviously it took him a little longer to add the fractions.



I may be wrong but I think the United States is the only country that does not use the metric system.

Eric



My point wasn't to debate the merits of either system, but rather the merit of offering a product for sale in the country with the #1 world economy with the measuring system used in that country.

I have worked in the printing industry for many years and a French company that was expanding to the US was trying to get me to try their ink, I asked for a couple quarts to test their product and the salesman asked me what is a quart? I suggested he figure it out and call me back when he's ready to sell me ink, never heard from him or the company again.

You are members of a select group of just 3 countries in the World (the other two are Bhurma and Liberia) using the old system and that is despite US legislation in the 1970's to migrate.

I found it very difficult to make the change but it has really made woodwork easier.

Peter

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2013, 02:17 PM »

You are members of a select group of just 3 countries in the World (the other two are Bhurma and Liberia) using the old system and that is despite US legislation in the 1970's to migrate.

I found it very difficult to make the change but it has really made woodwork easier.

Peter

An example of the people overruling the govt.
+1

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 7652
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2013, 02:31 PM »
My point wasn't to debate the merits of either system, but rather the merit of offering a product for sale in the country with the #1 world economy with the measuring system used in that country.

I have worked in the printing industry for many years and a French company that was expanding to the US was trying to get me to try their ink, I asked for a couple quarts to test their product and the salesman asked me what is a quart? I suggested he figure it out and call me back when he's ready to sell me ink, never heard from him or the company again.

If Festool is not to your liking you're welcome to buy other brands.  [wink]

You can't expect the whole world to adapt to you, sometimes you have to adapt yourself to get the best experience. Even if it takes some effort.

I myself for instance spent years learning an entire foreign language, English, giving me this tremendous benefit of being able to speak to so many people all around the world. Compared to that, learning metric really is a piece of cake.

Offline mhadler

  • Posts: 21
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2013, 02:56 PM »
I have to agree that there is no doubt that the metric system is much easier.  I'm actually going to try working in it for my woodworking.  I think the biggest reason for resistance is probably because people aren't used to visualizing things in metric dimensions.  For instance, I really can't envision what 100mm is off the top of my head, but I can very easily do that with 24".   I have a feeling that I will get used to it very easily after a short amount of time.


That said, I think you could make the argument that Festool might be missing out on some market opportunity by not producing imperial scale rules as an option.  It's not that hard to do.

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2013, 02:58 PM »
If Festool is not to your liking you're welcome to buy other brands.  [wink]

You can't expect the whole world to adapt to you, sometimes you have to adapt yourself to get the best experience. Even if it takes some effort.

I myself for instance spent years learning an entire foreign language, English, giving me this tremendous benefit of being able to speak to so many people all around the world. Compared to that, learning metric really is a piece of cake.


I don't expect the whole world to adapt to me, just those who are trying to sell products to me in the US. If I was going to the Netherlands to buy something I would expect it to be in metric. If I was selling a tool in the Netherlands I would be a fool to only offer it in inches.

Also it's not about me learning metric, it's about constantly converting between the two because it isn't used around here. Every tool I have is in inches. Most stuff sold here is in inches. It is how things are done here. Give the consumer a choice and see what they choose.



Back on topic of ripping thin strips with a track saw, I was watching a video on using the Festool parallel guide and it seems like the thickness of those parallel guides starts to become an issue with thinner materials. I guess that's why some folks like the Seneca Woodworking style that lays flat with the guide rail, but those won't be much help cutting thin strips though.
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Offline jmbfestool

  • Posts: 6634
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2013, 02:58 PM »
I agree with Alex.


 I think you should adapt to metric its far superior than imperial you won't regret it.

Alot easier to divide, multiply, subtract and add.  

I can't see how people can use imperial only crazy.

I use both only because UK uses both.   When I grew up in Holland I was taught metric when I moved to England I had to learn imperial. I thought imperial was junk I still do now lol.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 03:00 PM by jmbfestool »
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Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2013, 02:59 PM »
That said, I think you could make the argument that Festool might be missing out on some market opportunity by not producing imperial scale rules as an option.  It's not that hard to do.

Bingo!
+1

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3040
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2013, 03:02 PM »
Metric, Imperial, whatever. Most of the time I use neither- just a story stick. I certainly wouldn't get upset over it, nor would I pay more to see a European tool converted to Imperial which is what would happen if Festool had to re-engineer everything for the US market.


Offline Peter Halle

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Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2013, 03:28 PM »
I use the parallel guide set (with the extensions.)  For thinner stock I can place spacers underneath.  I also have an MFT/3 and use a system that Tom has posted here which basically uses a pattern to set up distances.  So for instance if I need to cut face frame parts at 2 1/4 " I'll make a pattern and then mark it and keep it.  You could also buy two of the edge stops that are used for the LR-32 system.  You could also use 2 adjustable squares.  2 Inca gauges.  I have another way that could be used but I will need to sketch it out.

Peter

Offline mhadler

  • Posts: 21
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2013, 03:55 PM »
Metric, Imperial, whatever. Most of the time I use neither- just a story stick. I certainly wouldn't get upset over it, nor would I pay more to see a European tool converted to Imperial which is what would happen if Festool had to re-engineer everything for the US market.



Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't most "re-engineering" consist of using a different rule sticker?   In the few other cases like the domino and the routers, it might require a new part for the depth stop, but that would be peanuts to produce.  Heck, you could just include it with the kit and have the end user decide which one to attach.   I don't think that would cost much at all.  And I am willing to bet that it would also pay for itself in new sales from the "old school" people who refuse to convert.

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2013, 03:58 PM »
I use the parallel guide set (with the extensions.)  For thinner stock I can place spacers underneath.  I also have an MFT/3 and use a system that Tom has posted here which basically uses a pattern to set up distances.  So for instance if I need to cut face frame parts at 2 1/4 " I'll make a pattern and then mark it and keep it.  You could also buy two of the edge stops that are used for the LR-32 system.  You could also use 2 adjustable squares.  2 Inca gauges.  I have another way that could be used but I will need to sketch it out.

Peter

Thanks. Would that be Tom Bellemare, Tom Bainbridge, Tom Gensmer, Tom in SoCal or another of the dozens of Toms registered in the forum? I'd like to track this down just not sure where to look.
+1

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2013, 04:02 PM »
Metric, Imperial, whatever. Most of the time I use neither- just a story stick. I certainly wouldn't get upset over it, nor would I pay more to see a European tool converted to Imperial which is what would happen if Festool had to re-engineer everything for the US market.



Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't most "re-engineering" consist of using a different rule sticker?   In the few other cases like the domino and the routers, it might require a new part for the depth stop, but that would be peanuts to produce.  Heck, you could just include it with the kit and have the end user decide which one to attach.   I don't think that would cost much at all.  And I am willing to bet that it would also pay for itself in new sales from the "old school" people who refuse to convert.

I agree and bumped a thread in the Festool wish list to focus in on this issue. Hopefully the metric/inch discussion can resume there http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-wish-list/non-metric-overlays/msg258728/?topicseen#msg258728
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 04:06 PM by Paul G »
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2013, 05:05 PM »
I use the parallel guide set (with the extensions.)  For thinner stock I can place spacers underneath.  I also have an MFT/3 and use a system that Tom has posted here which basically uses a pattern to set up distances.  So for instance if I need to cut face frame parts at 2 1/4 " I'll make a pattern and then mark it and keep it.  You could also buy two of the edge stops that are used for the LR-32 system.  You could also use 2 adjustable squares.  2 Inca gauges.  I have another way that could be used but I will need to sketch it out.

Peter

Thanks. Would that be Tom Bellemare, Tom Bainbridge, Tom Gensmer, Tom in SoCal or another of the dozens of Toms registered in the forum? I'd like to track this down just not sure where to look.

I believe this is one of two threads he did about this.  http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/how-i-rip-ff-and-door-pieces/

Peter

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2013, 05:10 PM »
Awesome, thanks much!
+1

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2748
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2013, 06:04 PM »
Some thoughts on Metric System.

My father was a carpenter when metric came in for Australia in 1970. After several frustrating months, he solved his frustration by simply throwing away his imperial rulers.

As for myself, I sometimes measure in imperial for increased accuracy.

I also work part time in a timber yard. Many customers of all ages still ask for 4x2and 3x1 1/2 inch when they really want 90x45 and 70x35 mm  timber.

« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 06:39 PM by Stephen B »
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2013, 06:38 PM »
Paul,

One of the things that I like about what Tom posted about is that you can use an existing piece as the basis for a pattern.  Say I have been using my table saw to rip face frame parts and in my system I use 2 3/16" wide face frame parts.  I can take an extra part, place it against the fence.  Then I take a piece of wood that will become the pattern to be used over and over again- the same thickness as I normally use - and place that next to the first piece.  I place my rail over both of those pieces and against the fence.  Make the cut.  The piece I just cut becomes the pattern forever unless I do something strange to my saw.  I will have the information written on the pattern and will never have to pull a tape measure again to make that 2 3/16" width part.

May not be to everyone's tastes, but it works without being too complicated.  Works real well if your thicknesses are all the same or extremely close.

Peter

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1986
Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2013, 10:02 PM »
Paul,

One of the things that I like about what Tom posted about is that you can use an existing piece as the basis for a pattern.  Say I have been using my table saw to rip face frame parts and in my system I use 2 3/16" wide face frame parts.  I can take an extra part, place it against the fence.  Then I take a piece of wood that will become the pattern to be used over and over again- the same thickness as I normally use - and place that next to the first piece.  I place my rail over both of those pieces and against the fence.  Make the cut.  The piece I just cut becomes the pattern forever unless I do something strange to my saw.  I will have the information written on the pattern and will never have to pull a tape measure again to make that 2 3/16" width part.

May not be to everyone's tastes, but it works without being too complicated.  Works real well if your thicknesses are all the same or extremely close.

Peter

Tom's method is simpler but I think I'm gonna try this other method first because the template and finish piece are the same width, rather than the difference between the guide and the finish width. http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-tools-accessories/parallel-guide-set-replace-the-table-saw/msg70770/#msg70770 Regardless it's good to have options, thank you very much for bringing it to my attention. It's interesting to get myself into a track saw frame of mind.

BTW here is Tom's other thread http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/rip-cuts-in-the-field/msg207991/#msg207991
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 10:24 PM by Paul G »
+1

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 6738
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Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2013, 10:50 PM »
I use the parallel guide set (with the extensions.)  For thinner stock I can place spacers underneath.  I also have an MFT/3 and use a system that Tom has posted here which basically uses a pattern to set up distances.  So for instance if I need to cut face frame parts at 2 1/4 " I'll make a pattern and then mark it and keep it.  You could also buy two of the edge stops that are used for the LR-32 system.  You could also use 2 adjustable squares.  2 Inca gauges.  I have another way that could be used but I will need to sketch it out.

Peter

Thanks. Would that be Tom Bellemare, Tom Bainbridge, Tom Gensmer, Tom in SoCal or another of the dozens of Toms registered in the forum? I'd like to track this down just not sure where to look.

I believe this is one of two threads he did about this.  http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/how-i-rip-ff-and-door-pieces/

Peter

Thats what i was going to say.

I just used Toms method for ripping some cabinet door stock. To easy.

As for the metric imperial controversy, the system is based on the 32 mm system. So to do things efficiently its best to stick with the metric.
I dont know squat about the metric system so I I got a metric converter app for my Iphone and it makes it alot easier figuring things out.
The more I use it the more it makes sense.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 10:54 PM by sancho57 »

Offline fastbike

  • Posts: 124
Re: Re: how to efficiently rip a bunch of strips with a track saw
« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2013, 11:02 PM »
Ply in the US is metric (18mm for 3/4, 12 mm for 1/2). Has been for a long time.

Frankly though, it's typically American, and perhaps our least endearing quality, to think that the world should change to fit our standards / methods / etc. The imperial system is long overdue for replacement in the practical arena as it has been in many scientific and engineering fields.

If America could send us ply to conform to our metric system we might return the favour, until then your stuck with mm ;)
I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now.