Recent Posts

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Dude, now that I understand what you mean with an MCU, you are a bit off with your terminology. MCU = microcontroller unit, and is basically an entire computer condensed to a single chip. It can hold multiple CPU's, and memory and other components a computer needs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller

CPU stands for Central Processor Unit, and it can indeed be extremely complex as the Pentium processors in our computers, but it can also be a very simply chip that maybe only knows how to calculate 1 + 1. As long as it's the central, most important component of the specific circuit.

Now what's inside the Midi Vac or a battery is indeed an MCU, and that MCU is a small computer that is a lot less complicated than the computer you find on your desktop, but it is still A LOT more complicated than all the other electronic parts that can make up a circuit.

Anything that runs software, like an MCU, requires a lot of complex components, which gives the designer a lot of flexibility, but it also sacrifices stability compared to hardwired components that only do a single function.

Firmware updates are notorious for their possibility to fail and render the entire device useless. I wonder if something as simple as a vac requires that level of complexity. It didn't in the past, and I don't really see what has changed.
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Yeah my bad, obviously I should have said its a MCU. Which is a totally different ball game.

Properly some PIC or Atmel. And these are pretty robust. Nevertheless, not too differentiate, but to measure the temperature and suction level. Although you can do that also analog, I guess  using a MCU is a bit easier. BT is just a gimmick, yet it comes in handy from time to time.

MCU? You're starting to lose me here. You mean Media Control Unit? Or the Marvel Cinematic Universe? Sorry, I had to google that. Whatever it is, if it requires software, it needs a CPU to function.

As for bluetooth, it is very convenient to have devices communicate with each other. I think lots of people like to activate their vacs with the bluetooth function. But then again, why on earth would you want to read the temperature and suction level on your phone? Now that's a useless gimmick. If those values are so critical (which they aren't) put an LCD display on your vac.

A basic rule for good design is to not make things overly complicated just because you can.

Aha, LOL  [big grin] Sorry.

A MCU (microprocessor) is not a CPU. Doesn't run Linux or some heavy OS. It's much "lighter" and there for much more robust (doesn't need extra h/w to run). No need to start up or shutdown, almost instant and need very little power.

The basic functions for a this vacuum, are a good use-case for that. They also cost next to nothing, and can be made fool proof. I didn't open my CTL, but I'm sure one of those are in there, and same for the BT remote. Without a MCU we would not have smart  Li-Ion battery charging, they control the RPM of your sander, drill, saw, etc.

I wouldn't read too much in that the temp. and suction level could be read on your phone (I understand your point, and indeed its a bit of a gimmick). Point here is the vacuum does need to know, so it can switch itself off or warn the user when the bag needs to be replaced (needed for M class, etc.) and/or the machine does't overheat. The data is there and is easily transferred via BT.

I don't think they (MCU's) crash that often (which was your point).

However, also a MCU runs software. And software needs to be tested. Failing to do so, could give you the results as the OP ran into. To update the software, you can do that fool proof. FT might just failed to do so (guessing).  But, I'm ahead of the game,  I'm not 100% what was the cause, but there is a good change the update routine is not fool-proof, hence it got bricked. It's also possible the firmware was updated correctly, but contained a bug which rendered it useless. And then there is a change (very small) its unrelated, and something just got fried (unlucky)....

Without a MCU, not many of FT tools (or other brands for the matter) would hit the market. And they are in almost everything with an electric cord or battery.

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Festool Tool Problems / Re: Domino 500q mortise width
« Last post by Cheese on Today at 07:15 PM »
My favorite tenon size is 5mm and I have to tap the tenons in with a small mallet.

I also use 5 mm Domino’s more than any other. They’re a snug fit but they will always fit in the mortise.
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The computer control allows easy maintenance and servicing amongst other things.

It makes complex tasks easier. But it makes easy tasks more complex.
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Yeah my bad, obviously I should have said its a MCU. Which is a totally different ball game.

Properly some PIC or Atmel. And these are pretty robust. Nevertheless, not too differentiate, but to measure the temperature and suction level. Although you can do that also analog, I guess  using a MCU is a bit easier. BT is just a gimmick, yet it comes in handy from time to time.

MCU? You're starting to lose me here. You mean Media Control Unit? Or the Marvel Cinematic Universe? Sorry, I had to google that. Whatever it is, if it requires software, it needs a CPU to function.

As for bluetooth, it is very convenient to have devices communicate with each other. I think lots of people like to activate their vacs with the bluetooth function. But then again, why on earth would you want to read the temperature and suction level on your phone? Now that's a useless gimmick. If those values are so critical (which they aren't) put an LCD display on your vac.

A basic rule for good design is to not make things overly complicated just because you can.
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Festool Tool Problems / Re: Domino 500q mortise width
« Last post by Dick Mahany on Today at 06:30 PM »
If someone who has DF500 around could cut 5 mm mortises on all three settings and report back the results (width, mm) that would be helpful.

Here you go...........

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Festool Tool Reviews / Re: HKC55 Review
« Last post by safety1st on Today at 06:28 PM »
thanks all for the comments!

correct, i was just making sure that my unit doesn't have a problem.

true, i can try denser lumber. like you guys say, it could be the lumber.

I think he's just trying to understand whether the cut quality is indicative of a problem.  Looking at the picture on a larger monitor, the 3rd piece down on the left side appears to be decent while the rest are ragged, which would suggest it's the wood, not the blade.  Try it again on something more dense?
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Festool Tool Problems / Re: Domino 500q mortise width
« Last post by Svar on Today at 06:10 PM »
If someone who has DF500 around could cut 5 mm mortises on all three settings and report back the results (width, mm) that would be helpful.
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Festool Tool Problems / Re: Domino 500q mortise width
« Last post by Birdhunter on Today at 06:02 PM »
Are the mortises all off by 1.6mm too wide in all 3 width settings?
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Festool Tool Problems / Re: Domino 500q mortise width
« Last post by Craig1961 on Today at 05:48 PM »
Good afternoon. The mortises are two narrow. The appear to be fine in the vertical direction. With a new bit it cut fine for the first few and then the same problem occurred. I am operating the machine the same way which is why i do not understand the inconsistency in the width of the mortises.

Thanks again for any guidance.

Craig
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