Author Topic: 45° Domino Jig  (Read 5165 times)

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Offline clark_fork

  • Posts: 280
45° Domino Jig
« on: May 16, 2015, 07:16 PM »
Peter Parfitt, in his recent video on chair making with the Domino 500 reminds about cutting Dominos at 45° when using Dominos in close quarters such a joining chair legs. I discovered this requirement with my  recent first project with the Domino 500. (A writing desk)  I created a two-headed jig to cut Dominos both at 45° and a way of reducing the size. With so few to cut, I use my 1905 Miller Falls Mitre Box. ( Please no Kapex Jr jokes) It is just right for quick work. I cut in the mortises first, screwed on a backing face and drilled out the holes with a 35mm bit. The hole provides a visual check on seating the Domino.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 07:22 PM by clark_fork »
Clark Fork

"A lot of people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths."  Stephen Wright

"straight, smooth and square" Mr. Russell, first day high school shop class-1954

" What's the good of it?" My Sainted Grandmother

"You can't be too rich, too thin or have too many clamps." After my introduction to pocket joinery and now the MFT work process

"Don't make something unless it is both made necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful,
don't hesitate to make it beautiful." -- Shaker dictum

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Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2921
Re: 45° Domino Jig
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2015, 07:49 PM »
Nice idea - I typically hold them with vice grips and run them through the bandsaw, but like this idea better!


Re: 45° Domino Jig
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2015, 04:42 AM »
This is clever. :)
Festool:  CS 50EB precisio set, Domino DF500, DF XL 700, OFK500 edge router, OF1010 router EHL65 planer, CTL Mini/Midi Vac, CTL 26 vac MFT800+1080 tables
DSC-AG Grinder,  RAS 115
Rotex 150, ETS EC 150/5 RTS400
Drills: T18, BHC18, CXS.
SysLite KAL II, SYS Rock.
Sys- and Sortainers galore.

Line up has been reduced with the introduction of Mafell/Metabo tools. Red Green and Blue do mix well in the shop.

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 1178
Re: 45° Domino Jig
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2015, 11:52 AM »
This looks like a really good and clever jig.  So clever, that my wimpy brain ??? is having a bit of trouble understanding how you line it up and where you make the cuts - in the kerf you have at each end or off of the very end?  How do you line it up to where you want the cut?  Maybe a few more photos would help?

Thanks, Mike

 

Offline clark_fork

  • Posts: 280
Re: 45° Domino Jig
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2015, 02:29 PM »
Simple Geometry:

When the Domino is seated, determine the direction of your cut, left hand or right hand and observe where the point of leading edge of the Domino will be when cut at the angle. Looking down on the jig which when assembled has two back to back boards, sight along the edge of the Domino which is where the point of the Domino will be when cut. Then, this line intersects with the line that is the edge of the hole. Then, with a combination square draw the 45° line hitting the intersected lines.  Using your Kapex, cut down on this line where the two lines intersect. My photo shows a direction line of the cut but your cut line hits the intersection. I use back to back face boards to reinforce the mortise and prevent it from collapsing.  Then, declare victory and go home.



Line intersection



In action with Kapex Jr.
Clark Fork

"A lot of people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths."  Stephen Wright

"straight, smooth and square" Mr. Russell, first day high school shop class-1954

" What's the good of it?" My Sainted Grandmother

"You can't be too rich, too thin or have too many clamps." After my introduction to pocket joinery and now the MFT work process

"Don't make something unless it is both made necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful,
don't hesitate to make it beautiful." -- Shaker dictum