Author Topic: How I rip FF and door pieces  (Read 39784 times)

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Offline tjbnwi

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How I rip FF and door pieces
« on: May 25, 2012, 09:30 PM »
Again, I'm surprised at the responses to the "Rips in the filed", as I stated it is a variation of how I cut my face frame and door/drawer rail and style pieces.

I cut a spacer that yields me a 2.25" wide pieces for the rails and styles and anther spacer that yields 1.5" pieces for the face frames. Other widths I handle on a case by case basis.

Shown is the spacer for door pieces. It is 5.0625" (.0625 makes up for blade loss) wide, my rail measures 7.250", back edge to cut side of splinter strip.

I install the MFT fence in the tall position, butt the long edge of the spacer to the fence, butt the straight lined edge of my material against the spacer, place the rail against the fence, and make the cut. This will yield a 2.250" piece for the door. Length is limited only by your guide rail length. It does not matter if the piece extends past the table.

There is a piece of cardboard between the material and the MFT top. I set the saw not to cut through the cardboard. When I'm doing a hardwood floor install, my rips are made right on the floor with only a piece of the packaging between the material and the floor.

I find this method easier and just as accurate as a table saw. I also feel it is faster and the edge of the material has fewer saw marks, if any. Clean up there is no comparison. For the record I do not own a top of the line table saw. I only have a DeWalt portable.

Tom

The spacer is also the master for Schlage, lock sets. The holes are for strike, dead bolt and bolt plates. If I damage my field jig, I have the master to make another.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2012, 09:32 PM by tjbnwi »

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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2012, 10:54 PM »
Needs complications...  [big grin]
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2012, 11:33 PM »
Needs complications...  [big grin]

We're not building watches, or is this going to be another Henry Graves Jr.- James Ward Packard situation?

(Google watch complications)

Tom

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2012, 08:41 AM »
HA! From Wikipedia: In horology (study of clocks), complication refers to any feature in a timepiece beyond the simple display of hours, minutes, and seconds.  [doh]

I love it, not only is there a "study of clocks" (never realized that) but these horologists sit around and count the number of "complications" in them. Where I work, sitting around studying the clock is frowned upon...

This says a lot about what the human race chose to spend it's free time on once we passed the point of needing all our time just to stay alive.

Tom, you not only have great ideas but also deep wisdom.  [not worthy] [not worthy] [not worthy]

Thanks for sharing them.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline jobsworth

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2012, 09:49 PM »
Thx,

Great info. I was wondering how one could make rails ad stiles with a TS 55/ guide rail as easy and fast a I could with a table saw.

Offline Iwood75

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2012, 09:26 PM »
Simply great solution! However, why did you say "It is 5.0625" (.0625 makes up for blade loss)." It appears that you are keeping the piece that's under the rail and not the off cut. So, why the need to consider the blade loss? Or, am I missing something here?  Thanks.
More is never enough.

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2012, 09:56 PM »
You are correct it is the piece under the rail I am using.

You're correct, thinking about it the blade loss it has no affect on this. The addional 1/16 is what it took to get the width correct.

Tom

Offline Iwood75

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2012, 09:16 PM »
I keep trying to make this rip idea – and my new TS 55 – work. However, I can't seem to hold the narrow (2.125") stiles and rails in place by merely the weight of the saw. The wood creeps as the saw cuts. I wish the rail had another black anti-slip strip near the front edge. I tried clamping the guide rail to the table and using the clamping elements to hold my "keeper" piece under the rail. It's just so much trouble to do this for each piece. Also, I think my FS 1400 rail is very slightly bowed. (What's the warranty on guide rails?) I'm not getting perfectly straight cuts. I've tried different sawing techniques such as walking along with the saw and pushing from behind with left hand and right. I always get the same bow. Is it me or is it the rail? The only good thing – so far – about the TS 55 compared to my Inca table saw, is its cleaner, smoother cut.  Any advice/observations to improve my results would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
More is never enough.

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2012, 10:28 PM »
A stop is all that should be necessary. The anti splinter strip holds my pieces in place.

Try glueing sand paper on the cardboard.

Which blade are you using?  I think mine is the universal one. I'll check tomorrow.

Tom

Offline Iwood75

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2012, 10:40 PM »
I'm using the universal blade which came with the TS 55.
More is never enough.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2012, 12:19 AM »
I'm using the universal blade which came with the TS 55.

The standard supplied blade is the fine tooth blade. The universal blade has fewer teeth.

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2012, 07:14 AM »
Michael is correct, the universal blade has 28 teeth, the one you have in the saw is the 48 tooth fine blade.

Try the 28 tooth blade, see if it corrects the issue.

Sorry for the confusion, I never thought to mention this. Guess I should leave the education to Paul and Peter, with their videos.

I do use the fine blade, primarily on sheet goods.

Tom

Offline Iwood75

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2012, 07:45 AM »
Thanks guys.  Don't understand how fewer teeth will resolve the creeping problem. Will I be compromising the smooth cut of the 48 tooth blade? So far, that's the only advantage that the TS 55 seems to offer over my table saw. And, I'm sure I can improve my table saw cut by purchasing a different blade for it, instead of investing in a 28 tooth blade for the TS 55 and "hoping" that it fixes the movement issues. And, I still have to resolve my "straightness-of-cut" issue.
More is never enough.

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2012, 07:50 AM »
Make a cut with the rail resting on a piece of sheet goods. No clamps. Check that cut to see if it is straight. Pull a string very tight corner to corner to check it.

The universal blade makes a very clean cut.

What wood are you cutting?

Tom

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2012, 09:18 AM »
I would suggest that you try the universal blade.  It really is a blade that should be in your collection.  The fine blade is really designed for sheet goods and not solid timber except for cross cutting.  When ripping solid wood the blade can't exit the chips fast enough and that puts strain on the blade which can help drag the work along as it is fighting to cut.

As others have said a stop at the end of the board can also help prevent it from being pushed along.  You have a table saw.  How about making some sacrificial blocks that have a stem ripped to fit into the mft holes with a block 1/2 thick glued on top of a size that will not fall thru the mft holes.  As long as that "stop" hits the good board then creep should be eliminated.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Peter

Offline Iwood75

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2012, 10:42 AM »
I'll pick up a universal, 28 tooth blade on Wednesday. Woodcraft/Baltimore is holding one for me.

Tom, I'll use your suggested method to test for rail straightness with sheet goods, no clamps, string, etc.  Peter, I have Qwas Dogs so I thought I'd use one as a stop – unless you are suggesting wider, flat custom wooden ones would work better for this purpose.  Thanks for your last posted advice and information, Tom and Peter.
More is never enough.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2012, 10:49 AM »
I'll pick up a universal, 28 tooth blade on Wednesday. Woodcraft/Baltimore is holding one for me.

Tom, I'll use your suggested method to test for rail straightness with sheet goods, no clamps, string, etc.  Peter, I have Qwas Dogs so I thought I'd use one as a stop – unless you are suggesting wider, flat custom wooden ones would work better for this purpose.  Thanks for your last posted advice and information, Tom and Peter.

I am sure that a Qwas dog would work.  I am going to the shop to clean up after the last project and in preparation of the next.  I will try to takes Tom suggestion (which I think is great) and see how it goes for me.  Just make sure that the hole pattern keeps it (Qwas dog) out of blade's way  [eek].  Wood was just for cheap sacrificial purposes and blade safety.

Peter

P.S. - You are very welcome! 

Offline rdesigns

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2012, 11:07 AM »
Thanks for a really useful method--you've solved a number of problems with your idea: the cardboard false top saves the mft surface; the wide spacer supports the track when ripping narrow pieces; the width of the spacer(s) takes away any issues with repeatability; you give a way to use the length of the mft in addition to its width; and, best of all to me, it's all low-tech, simple and brilliant!


Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2012, 07:41 PM »
You're welcome I (something third personish about that statement).

I really do hope others try this and refine the method to work for them.

I've not had the issue of the board sliding, so I've yet to need/use a stop. I have ripped oak, cheery, maple, pine, alder and Ipe with this method. If I need one it would be either the stationary piece from one of my clamping elements, or something that would mount to the profile of the MFT.

Tom
« Last Edit: June 18, 2012, 09:16 PM by tjbnwi »

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2012, 11:48 PM »
Thinking about a stop. Simply run a screw into the edge of the spacer, leave it stick out an inch or so.

Tom
« Last Edit: June 18, 2012, 11:54 PM by tjbnwi »

Offline lumbajac

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2012, 09:45 AM »
Thinking about a stop. Simply run a screw into the edge of the spacer, leave it stick out an inch or so.

Tom

Or maybe a domino for little more stability.
Corey - U.P. of Michigan

Offline Kev

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2012, 11:03 AM »
Very practical Tom [wink]

Not only that ... if you have a width you wish to copy, put that against the fence and use your method to cut the spacer. You don't even need to measure a thing.

Nicely done!

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2012, 05:15 PM »
To add to this discussion, let's say that you are going to try this and already have a rail or stile the correct width.  To make the spacer put the rail or stile against the MFT fence, then put your soon to be master spacer board next to it and set up your rail as Tom shows and then cut your spacer.  No fuss.

I was going to do this yesterday, but I will be making these type of spacers for my parts for aquarium stands.

Thanks again Tom!

Peter

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2012, 06:55 PM »
Everyone,

You're welcome and thanks for the additional suggestions.

Today I used the "rips in the field" method again.

I chose a screw for a stop, because everyone can find a screw (get your minds out of the gutter) but not everyone has a Domino.

I hope everyone who wishes to use this method can make it work for them.

Tom

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2012, 07:02 PM »
Everyone,

You're welcome and thanks for the additional suggestions.

Today I used the "rips in the field" method again.

I chose a screw for a stop, because everyone can find a screw (get your minds out of the gutter) but not everyone has a Domino.

I hope everyone who wishes to use this method can make it work for them.

Tom

I know when I lose a screw, that's the first place I look.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2012, 07:24 PM »
Ken,

Wow!  Is your MFT set up on your roof or at the edge of the street?

Peter

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2012, 07:38 PM »
It hovers above my inverted vac-sys.

Offline ScotF

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2012, 11:02 PM »
Everyone,

You're welcome and thanks for the additional suggestions.

Today I used the "rips in the field" method again.

I chose a screw for a stop, because everyone can find a screw (get your minds out of the gutter) but not everyone has a Domino.

I hope everyone who wishes to use this method can make it work for them.

Tom

I know when I lose a screw, that's the first place I look.


Next time I lose a screw I am going to call Sanchos...

Scot

Offline Iwood75

  • Posts: 122
Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2012, 07:35 PM »
Thanks Tom for your "ripping good" idea. Here's my take on it. It's just a variation that I think will work better for me.

First, I replaced the cardboard table protector with 1/4" plywood. This gives me a flatter surface for my clamping. (See photos, hope they work.) It's still cheap and lightweight and will hold up better in storage.

Then, the biggest difference is using a wooden fence on TOP of the spacer board. By sliding it forward or back, its "size" is variable. And, I can clamp the fence and spacer together so there's no chance the spacer board will move during cutting. So, I'll just store these 3 "Rip Kit" components together and easily and quickly be ready to go the next time I'm ripping narrow pieces with no need to cut new spacers. I've planed this spacer board down to 18mm for this project – and to level it in the future with 19mm stock – I'll just shim it up 1mm. Obviously, if I ever rip 1/2' material, I'll need a new spacer board but probably 95% of the time, I use the TS 55 for 3/4" material.

Note that my spacer board's lower front edge is rabbeted so saw dust/chips won't interfere with good board contact and I used your suggestion (thanks) to add the Domino in the edge to keep my keeper piece from creeping.

52911-0

52913-1

52915-2
More is never enough.

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: How I rip FF and door pieces
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2012, 08:07 PM »
I'm glad you were able to work out the details for your best use I (again that third person thing).

I only post what I do as suggestions. Everyone needs to adapt it to their way of working.

Who ever suggest the Domino, that thanks goes to you.

Tom