Author Topic: Part 1: Routing/Milling 80/20 for Festool clamps using an MFS & a 1010  (Read 3755 times)

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Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 1913
Perhaps I will finally reach small-shop Nirvana, loosely defined as being able to use my tools/worksurfaces without first having to move something out of the way...

I hear you loud and clear Richard. Move items off the drill press to use it, move items off the metal chop saw to use it (and the metal chop doesn't have much real-estate in the first place  [tongue]), move items off the planer to use it. About the only tools that are safe from being used as available storage space are the 2 bench grinders.

Looking at your welding table made me think about how much some things have changed. The first welding classes I took were at the local Vo-Tech about 50+ years ago. Every welding table there was just a bunch of welded angle iron with supports that used fire brick as the welding surface. What a kluge job but that was the common solution back then.

You got it. In my case the bandsaw (10") is sitting on the Shapeoko3 CNC.

At the risk of totally sidetracking this thread... metal shop for me was first discovered in junior high 40+ ago. With the welding tables you described but oxy/acetylene only. We did have a couple of lathes and the same teacher taught drafting, I took every shop class I could get after that.

These new holey tables for welding seem to be recently DIY-practical, I guess due to lasers & CNC. The machined Strong Hand tables are too pricey (& heavy) for most of us DIY'ers.

In my 20's I started with a buzz box & then moved up to an old Millermatic 175 MIG and did side jobs making/selling trailers and ?? Abrasive chop saw and a 4" angle grinder I had until 20 years later SS Sandy claimed it along with the little 115V MIG I'd downgraded to following my move to the east coast. I'd been determined to replace it and last year grabbed a beautiful Miller 215 115/230 after a long internal debate over MIG/TIG ended with a practical pull the trigger and weld steel compromise. That little machine on 230V will lay down a killer bead on up to 1/4" material even though it rated for less. All this lead to the welding table and my spring-2019 shop-reorg predicament.

I just saw that Miller released a MIG/TIG AC/DC machine for around $3K & buyer's remorse set in. I'd really like to have TIG aluminum capability but that leads to multiple gasses and right back to "where the heck do I put this stuff?".

Ron's right, the only solution is more shop space.  [doh]

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6365
Hey @Cheese might want to take a look around and see if any of the community colleges or high schools offer a adult ed welding class. Our community college has one that meets for 10 3 hour sessions once a week in the evening. Once they figure out you are not going to blow yourself up or set yourself on fire, they let us work on personal projects. There are a few of us that keep taking it again for the shop time.

Ron

Ya I agree 100%...I did that for years when registering for "Machine Tool Process" at the local Vo-Tech.  Because our local Vo-Tech instructor and I both worked for 3M at the time, we became kindered spirits of sorts....and once I proved I wasn't going to destroy the shop and burn down the building I was left to do my own projects.  [smile]

An interesting footnote...I brought in 15" diameter American Racing wheels in magnesium and decided to turn the profile down because they were pitted. Everything was fine until I mentioned that they were magnesium, at which time the instructor went directly to the wall and pulled off a fire extinguisher and he stood in front of me as I turned down the profile on the wheels. Greg later stated that magnesium with the addition of a little water can start a fire that can't be easily extinguished.

I brought those magnesium chips home, started them on fire...what a show...lesson learned.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2727
We have a facility in Chicago - Arc Academy - which is a maker space for welding and metal working.  They offer classes plus you can rent shop time for $20/hour.  Might see if there is a similar facility in your area.

Richard - I just bought the 215 miller as well.  Got the Mig and Tig package.  From what I've read on the AC/DC Mig & Tig they released, the jury might still be out on it.

neil

Offline Richard/RMW

  • Posts: 1913

Richard - I just bought the 215 miller as well.  Got the Mig and Tig package.  From what I've read on the AC/DC Mig & Tig they released, the jury might still be out on it.

neil

And given the cost it's neutral if I just pick up a dedicated TIG machine. Probably will take the plunge later this summer after I get the current mess sorted out.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!