Author Topic: Parallel Guides and Extensions -- 3 videos on usage and cutting sheet goods  (Read 22696 times)

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Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
I hope both previous purchasers and those considering purchasing these accessories will find these 3 videos useful:

Large sheets and sacrificial table --
Video_1_Festool TS 55 Plunge Saw with Parallel Guides for Cutting Plywood

   

Parallel guides -- Video 2 Festool Parallel Guides For Repetitive Cutting

   

Parallel guide extensions  --  Video_3_Festool Parallel Guide Extensions for cutting narrow pieces   




These accessories are completely different from any other woodworking tool. Just figuring out how to put it together and use it is a challenge. Once you get there, you will not want to part with them.

These are available in 1080p High Definition fullscreen if you go to them directly on youtube.  Playback may be a little smoother over there.

Roger Muller
       

< Edited by Shane Holland to fix YouTube link >
« Last Edit: May 19, 2010, 03:19 PM by Shane Holland »

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Offline Jay Evans

  • Posts: 50
OUTSATNDING Roger, excellent videos, great table, excellent points made.  I especially like the point about the parallel guides not being made for squaring.  Sometimes it will work, but they are not designed for that-

Thanks so much for doing these.  What an excellent resource for TS owners !!
Jay

Offline RonWen

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 1701
    • Ordering
Great videos Roger!  Very helpful.  I also built a sacrificial 42" x 75" cutting table from 2x4's & picnic table legs.  I usually tip it on it's side, clamp the ply sheet to it & set it back upright to avoid lifting the ply sheets.  It has actually held my 240lbs. on occasion.  http://picasaweb.google.com/ronwenner/PLYCUTTINGTABLE?authkey=Gv1sRgCPmV5Lzrz9-vIw#
« Last Edit: May 18, 2010, 05:45 PM by RonWen »

Offline Ben Davis

  • Posts: 58
Left a comment on YouTube.  Very well done.  Thank you so much for the insight!

Offline harry_

  • Posts: 1331
+1 well done
Disclaimer: This post is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental. Void where prohibited. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. Contents may settle during shipment. Use only as directed. No other warranty expressed or implied. This is not an offer to sell securities. May be too intense for some viewers. No user-serviceable parts inside. Subject to change without notice. One size fits all (very poorly).

Offline lym

  • Posts: 33
great video.  how did you cut the slots for joints of your cutting table?

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
I cut the joints with a dado blade on a table saw.  I set the dados very tight and used gorilla glue on them.  I thought about using the router, but decided the table saw was easier

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2770
Excellent videos, Roger.  Very well done and informative.  Thanks for posting these.

Scot

Offline jstockman

  • Posts: 65
Roger,

You have the skills to do demonstation commercials for anyone!

Great Job!

Jim

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
Thank you Jim for that complement.  It made my day!  It's really fun to do things you enjoy.

Offline Steven Herbin

  • Posts: 28
Fabulous job on the videos.

When I used my guides for the first time it was like a light came on and I said to myself that this was the missing piece to the puzzle. No more measuring and no more being a 16th off.

However, the second time I was working in a darker place and somehow managed to get the guides backwards so the tapes were on the outside. At least I got some more practice at getting the guides off and putting them back on.

--Steve.
ATF55, MFT 1080, OF1400, DX93, Domino, ETS150/3, CT22, Various Rails, Parallel Guides, Misc. clamps and stuff

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
I agree that the lights really come on once you use the parallel guides.  It is impossible to understand them when they are on a shelf in a store, looking at a picture is OK, but watching the videos and more importantly actually using them on a real project make you really appreciate what a great accessiory they are. 

Offline grobin

  • Posts: 197
Thanks a lot! I didn't get how to cut thin strips from the supplied non-instructions.

I got the guide rails and extension to do pretty vanilla ply carcase book cases.  I am starting to do open frame book cases and shelving using hard wood for the frames.  I need to make repeatable cut on stock that is 36mm square or 19x62mm and longer than I can do with the small band saw that I have.  Is there any way to do this using the parallel guides and extension?

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
Grobin:  As I understand your request, you want to cut solid stock to 2 different dimensions:   (a)  36 x 36 mm    and   (b)  19 x 62 mm.   You want to use the Guide rail and parallel guides and extensions.  This should be within the capabilities of the system with a few caveats that come to mind

1.  The 62mm depth will not be able to be cut by the TS 55.   You would need the TS 75 for this
2.  The stock must be planed with a jointer on 2 adjacent sides -- i.e. have a square edge.  I would not tackle rough wood that is not planed with just the guide rail to try to work this stock up
3.  You do not state the dimensions of the rough stock you are working with.   You are going to have to use some sort of a table like mine.  Once you get the rails, parallel guides and extensions in place, you are going to have make sure that nothing is "flopping around".  Most likely this means the back ends of the parallel guides are going to need to be supported somehow by "dummy" fillers to keep them at an elevation to get everything within the same plane so that all sorts of bad things don't happen when you start cutting.   Scrap block, carpenter's shims etc would be very useful.   To hold these in place -- try any of the following:   luck, double stick carpet tape, hot glue, air nailer, etc.
4.  Make sure you have long enough Rails so you don't have to reposition them.

This would be an operation I would most likely do on a decent table saw if I had access to one.  I would not hesitate at all to use the Festool system for this out on a job site where there was no table saw available.   These pieces are not "thin" strips.  I rip all thin strips on the Festool and the more common dimensional lumber on the table saw.  Either the table saw or the Festool system will give you a much better finished edge than a band saw.

I believe that covers the major issues

Roger

There may be other issues I have not thought about here.

Offline Ben Davis

  • Posts: 58
Grobin:  As I understand your request, you want to cut solid stock to 2 different dimensions:   (a)  36 x 36 mm    and   (b)  19 x 62 mm.   You want to use the Guide rail and parallel guides and extensions.  This should be within the capabilities of the system with a few caveats that come to mind

1.  The 62mm depth will not be able to be cut by the TS 55.   You would need the TS 75 for this
2.  The stock must be planed with a jointer on 2 adjacent sides -- i.e. have a square edge.  I would not tackle rough wood that is not planed with just the guide rail to try to work this stock up
3.  You do not state the dimensions of the rough stock you are working with.   You are going to have to use some sort of a table like mine.  Once you get the rails, parallel guides and extensions in place, you are going to have make sure that nothing is "flopping around".  Most likely this means the back ends of the parallel guides are going to need to be supported somehow by "dummy" fillers to keep them at an elevation to get everything within the same plane so that all sorts of bad things don't happen when you start cutting.   Scrap block, carpenter's shims etc would be very useful.   To hold these in place -- try any of the following:   luck, double stick carpet tape, hot glue, air nailer, etc.
4.  Make sure you have long enough Rails so you don't have to reposition them.

This would be an operation I would most likely do on a decent table saw if I had access to one.  I would not hesitate at all to use the Festool system for this out on a job site where there was no table saw available.   These pieces are not "thin" strips.  I rip all thin strips on the Festool and the more common dimensional lumber on the table saw.  Either the table saw or the Festool system will give you a much better finished edge than a band saw.

I believe that covers the major issues

Roger

There may be other issues I have not thought about here.


I would recon that the stock is 19mm thick, or very close to 3/4 of an inch.  I have a hard time seeing a 62mm thick x 19mm wide face frame!

Offline Rich Atwood

  • Posts: 4
Roger, what a great job.  Your teaching technique top notch.  I don't believe this was your first time doing such a project.  My hats off to you.  Thanks for all the valuable info..... ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Rich

Offline grobin

  • Posts: 197
Thanks for the reply.  I am sorry that I wasn't too clear.  Normally I would cross cut the longer stock on my band saw and then break them down to working sizes.  I got a "bargain" on some lyptus but its 6' long by 36mm square and I need to cut it down to a size I can use for open framing.  Approximately 3' pieces would work fine.  But I am not sure how to set up the Guide rails for cross cuts on relatively narrow think stock.   Is using a piece of stock to support near each guide rail to get level then cutting going to work? Or is that a really dumb idea?  I am mostly using the guide rails to cut Baltic birch ply for shelves.  Looks like I may have a lot of repetitive cross cuts that my small band saw is not going o handle.  Eventually I will get a better band saw.  Once I get it the size that I need I will use a resaw blade on the band saw to make the this strips that I need.

BTW thanks for the setup information, it is very handy.

Offline Ted Owen

  • Posts: 14
Wow, Roger, fantastic job. Thank you. Those helped me understand better.

Best, Ted

Offline lym

  • Posts: 33
i made your cutting table and it is fantastic.  sturdy, flat and lots of places to clamp.  thank you much.  the parallel guides sure came in handy to cut the pieces.  thank you again for a great idea.

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
The table has worked out great for me.  I have thought about the next generation -- make the "wells" a little bit larger for the parallel guide extensions, beef the legs up a little, maybe some sort of roller to adjust upwards at one end to aid in pulling sheets out of the pickup. 

You did bring up an important point -- there are lots and lots of places to clamp with many different types of woodworking clamps. 

I would be interested in what someone who knows the structural aluminum materials and joints such as the material that "80/20" in  Columbia City IN sells might come up with as an alternate material (get rid of more weight).  Somehow sacrificial material would have to attached to the aluminum in order not to ding it up.   I doubt if anyone would want to make too expensive a table if they go to construction sites where they might be stolen.  80/20 sells there scrap pieces on eBay

Also, I throw large sheets of cardboard on this table to spray finish projects, particularly if they are in "component" stage.  I wouldn't place large pieces of furniture on it, but it certainly holds kitchen cabinets adequately.

One individual who is going to build one has a need to move sheets of plywood into his work area from a warehouse area, through several offices, etc.   He is going to build the torsion box and make it so it swivels to a vertical position.  He has it suspended at each end in a fashion similar to a "baby cradle with suspension posts".  The cart that these are on has 4 nice swivel casters.  He loads the plywood while in a near vertical position (just so it doesn't slide off) and wheels it off where it needs to be.  He then will flips to horizontal and does his Festool work.  I hope he posts it if he succeeds in getting it done.


Offline rnt80

  • Posts: 953
    • Agape Wood Design
I've been working on a whole house job and have been using my guides and the Walko bench.  The guides were certainly worth the investment.  It's been the first real time that I've had the chance to use the Walko and it has been great.  I ended up cutting most of the plywood with the Walko laying flat on the ground.  I cut up a bunch of 1/2" ply the other day with the Walko tipped over in it's a-frame mode.  It was the perfect height for cutting and it support enough of the sheet to make the process easy.
Russell Tribby
Gilbert AZ
www.agapewooddesign.com

Offline grobin

  • Posts: 197
Thanks again for the great videos.  I am a little slow.  All I had to do is make sure that the parallel guides and extensions were level by using some scrap.  Now when I go to cut long vertical supports for the cases I get the cuts right every time and I can even cut multiple pieces at once.  Thanks for the table idea, its great. 

Offline jstockman

  • Posts: 65
Thank you Jim for that complement.  It made my day!  It's really fun to do things you enjoy.

Roger,

I am in process of doing some online screen shot videos for my web site.  What software did you use to all you to show yourself talking in the fore front of the demonstation as in the background it showed you working with the guide.

Thx,


Jim

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
Grobin   --- don't put yourself down as "a little slow"  when working with the parallel guides and extensions.   They are very different from anything you have worked with before.  On more than one occasion I have stopped and taken a walk to think about how best to do what I am faced with.  Most often a strategic placement of some scrap wood and some clamps get the job done.  This table offers all kinds of ways to clamp materials and scraps down

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 314
Jstockman --- The headshot with me talking overlayed was shot separately against a green background (chromakey).  The footage was assembled in Final Cut Pro and a MacIntosh with a chromakey filter on that footage to knock out all of the green.  If you need some help doing this with whatever your software is search on YOUTUBE for chromakey and the name of the software you are using.  More than likely somebody has put something out there

Offline jstockman

  • Posts: 65
Jstockman --- The headshot with me talking overlayed was shot separately against a green background (chromakey).  The footage was assembled in Final Cut Pro and a MacIntosh with a chromakey filter on that footage to knock out all of the green.  If you need some help doing this with whatever your software is search on YOUTUBE for chromakey and the name of the software you are using.  More than likely somebody has put something out there

Ah my son is using final cut.  That is professional stuff and Adobe doesn't that stuff away.  I'll have to look around for a cheaper competitor. 

I'll take a look at them through youtube.

Thx,

Jim

Offline darbo

  • Posts: 21
Roger,
Your videos are fantastic. The quality is superb in every way, especially your instruction, and I have enjoyed multiple viewings of them. The more I think about an open-cell table, the more logical it seems to me. Your table seems to support a convenient/easy/flexible workflow for using the parallel guides and I am presently considering making a similar table for my own use.

You indicated that the table in your video is a second-generation table and that you're considering a third-gen table that would have "wells a little bit larger for the parallel guide extensions". Since you have developed a wealth of experiential knowledge with your tables, what has your experience taught you regarding the optimal size for the wells? Thanks!

David
David

Offline marimar

  • Posts: 2
I hope this is the appropriate post to discuss this on.  I'm looking into purchasing my first festool circular saw with straight edge guide.  I'm torn over which one to buy.  I do some 3/4 sheet good cutting but I do a lot of door reconstruction that requires the use of a straight edge.  My concern is the weight.  Do I need the larger saw for cutting 1.75 doors.  Most doors are exterior, pine, but some are interior, hardwood.  I'm thinking the larger saw is more appropriate for the extra saw depth and amperage, though can the TS55 perform the same task.  I obviously would need the larger saw for 2.25 doors but I seldom come across this thickness door so I don't want to over saw the task.  What would ones opinion be that has come across the work situations that I am questioning.

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7384
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Hi Marimar and welcome to forum.

Like you I cut a fair number of doors with my TS55 (the smaller Festool saw). It works well on pine and you've got to cut lot more slowly on thicker hardwoods but it certainly is doable. Getting the right blade is important, I like a third party 28 tooth blade made by Tenryu. I haven't used my hand held planer on a door since I bought my TS 55. Good luck. 
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline marimar

  • Posts: 2
Thanks Brice for the tip.  I had an Altendorf Panel saw that we ran Tenaryu's on that worked very well.  Will take up your advice on this also.  I'm used to using a straight edge with a Skill 77 when modifying existing doors in the field.  Not very accurate and a lot of blade wobble needing edge planing before glue up.  Have you found that you need to plane the cut edge of a door stile modification before gluing up a new stile when using the Festool for a similar issue?

Thanks again for the quick follow up.

MariMar