Author Topic: Blackbirds nesting  (Read 1200 times)

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Offline Lbob131

  • Posts: 469
Blackbirds nesting
« on: May 11, 2019, 06:24 PM »
I have a blackbirds  nest  with  fledglings  in an old  unused small   polycarbonate   green house  in my garden.
It has no door  and my dogs  also  use it as a shelter.

I was thinking  of partially  closing the entrance  with some plywood  with like a platform   at  the top  for the  parent  birds to rest on  as they  enter/exit.
How will the birds react to this?

I don't want  the fledglings   leaving the nest  and being killed by my dogs. One is quite  old and the other is a youngish jack russell.
The  garden  in the which the  dogs roam  and the  greenhouse is situated   is quite large  but fenced  around.
So my dogs are  the only predators.
I would appreciate any  ones  opinion on my plan. Thank you.


Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1095
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2019, 07:52 PM »
a .22 or even a pellet gun would do the trick.

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6080
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2019, 02:41 AM »
When the fledglings start to leave the nest they can go anywhere, you can't contain them. Only thing you can do that would help them is to contain the dogs.

a .22 or even a pellet gun would do the trick.

I sincerely doubt he wants to shoot his dogs to protect the birds.  [blink]



Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6377
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2019, 03:54 AM »
I sincerely doubt he wants to shoot his dogs to protect the birds.  [blink]

Now that's funny Alex...

10 minutes later and I'm still laughing.  [big grin] [big grin]
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 03:56 AM by Cheese »

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2744
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2019, 04:21 AM »
And down here there is some debate as to whether they are welcome or an introduced pest. First introduced down here in 1860s, some have even managed to migrate further south in to the sub Antarctica. I recently had a nest in the Untidy Shop on a shelf above my Festool KS60. Had to keep it covered when not in use. Fortunately most of the mess stayed up on the shelf. Mum was most upset when I used the saw - but all turned out for the best. Have since covered her access route though. But come next Spring - where there is a will, there is a way!

http://birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/Common-Blackbird

@Cheese  and @Alex   I laughed too, very funny.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 08:30 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
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Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6080
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2019, 12:26 PM »
Thought it was a bit of an odd recommendation to use a gun.... [big grin]

Untidy, why would you consider blackbirds a pest? I know Aussies have this trauma with introduced rabbits which really are a pest, but blackbirds are lovely birds and not every introduced species has to be pest just because it is introduced. Do they cause any harm to the local fauna? They are pretty mellow, and the male has a lovely singing voice.

I always used to have a pair of blackbirds in my garden, returning every year, until my son of a #@#$%# new neighbour cut down the tree in MY garden in which they nested. Now that guy's a pest for real. Jim, could I borrow your pellet gun for a day?

Offline Oldwood

  • Posts: 367
  • Alberta, Canada
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2019, 01:22 PM »
I agree with Alex for me they are a pleasant bird and I like to see them around. We get red and yellow headed versions as well as the all black version.
Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance.
Confucius

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2744
Re: Blackbirds nesting
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2019, 05:31 PM »
.. . .
Untidy, why would you consider blackbirds a pest? I know Aussies have this trauma with introduced rabbits which really are a pest, but blackbirds are lovely birds and not every introduced species has to be pest just because it is introduced. Do they cause any harm to the local fauna? They are pretty mellow, and the male has a lovely singing voice.

I always used to have a pair of blackbirds in my garden, returning every year, until my son of a #@#$%# new neighbour cut down the tree in MY garden in which they nested. Now that guy's a pest for real. Jim, could I borrow your pellet gun for a day?

Hi @Alex

I did not say that I 'personally' consider them to be a pest. After all I let the babies mature and leave the nest. They are however considered a pest -

https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/birds/blackbird

Blackbirds are considered pests because they damage a variety of soft fruits including berries, cherries, stone fruit and grapes. They are thought to spread weeds, such as blackberry. They cause damage in gardens and may compete with native birds for food and nesting sites.

So Blackbirds are more a pest to agriculture than native birds. In fact many native birds such as Cockatoos also threaten agriculture. If the nest had been of Indian Minor bids I would have certainly destroyed the nest. These prolific breaders  are having a devistating effect on our native birds.

https://www.aepma.com.au/PestDetail/92/Indian%20Myna%20Bird

Indian Myna Birds are territorial and highly aggressive birds that compete with and displace native wildlife for habitat areas. They take over tree hollows and plug up nest sites they are not using, forcing possums and birds out and ejecting nestlings and eggs from their nests. They also compete with native fauna for food and habitat. Indian Myna birds can be an economic problem because they damage fruit and grain crops and their noise and smell can be annoying where they are in large numbers. Indian Mynas can also spread mites and they have the potential to spread disease to people and domestic animals. Indian Mynas become quite fearless of people if they are not hassled and can be a problem in outdoor eating areas by stealing food off people’s plates. There are a few records of Indian Mynas attacking people, but this is not common.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 06:01 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values