Author Topic: Shop goofs  (Read 1129 times)

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Online Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 132
Shop goofs
« on: July 23, 2019, 04:23 PM »
Here's what happens when the router sled falls off the rails.  Anyone else willing to share their foul-ups?

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2019, 09:01 PM »
Ouch! That's not gonna rub out. :-)
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 132
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2019, 08:04 AM »
Ouch! That's not gonna rub out. :-)
Nope.  Fortunately, this was the underside of the piece.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 11981
  • MacGyver - My boy 2010 - 2019 RIP
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2019, 08:23 AM »
My biggest OOPS! moment did not affect a piece of wood - surprisingly.  It involved a tool.

I was cutting crown on my trusty Hitachi miter saw and then around lunchtime I made a cut and then saw sparks and my saw partially separated.  A casting on the saw that formed the base for the depth adjustment had broken off prior to that cut for some unknown reason and in my haste I cut thru the saw base.

Luckily I had enough cash in my bank account and a dealer 45 minutes away who had exactly one Kapex in stock.  That was back in 2010.

I got great satisfaction tossing that Hitachi into the dumpster after saying thank you for all the years of service.

Peter

Offline pixelated

  • Posts: 184
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2019, 09:09 AM »
I was cutting some lumber I was recycling from another project on my (blue) miter saw. In one cut, near the end of a piece, the saw's pitch changed a bit, and it needed a bit more pressure than usual to finish the cut. Didn't think much about at the time, since the behavior change was only slight. I figured it was going through a knot or similar.
Then when I put the newly-cut piece into place, I noticed the remains of two stainless screws that were neatly flush cut with the end of the wood. [crying] [mad]
The only visible damage I could find on the blade were a few teeth with very slight nicks in them, though the blade doesn't cut as cleanly as it had prior. I still use it occasionally for rough work (but checked more thoroughly for metal).

Offline MikeGE

  • Posts: 25
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2019, 10:11 AM »
Nope.  Fortunately, this was the underside of the piece.
Make it a uniform recessed depth, clean up the corners, and put a "Hand made by Dogberryjr" plaque in the space.

Online Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 132
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2019, 01:48 PM »
Nope.  Fortunately, this was the underside of the piece.
Make it a uniform recessed depth, clean up the corners, and put a "Hand made by Dogberryjr" plaque in the space.
I like it!  I filled it with extra epoxy and I'm not going to think about it any more once it's flipped over.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2019, 03:07 PM »
"put a "Hand made by Dogberryjr" plaque in the space."

Great idea!

It's not a goof, it's a design element.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3866
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2019, 08:55 PM »
One of the more embarrassing was a couple of years ago with my TSC55. Earlier in the day I had done a whole series of cuts on shorter boards where I had used the rail clamps. So I had developed a muscle memory of finishing the cut, returning the saw to the front of the rail while i grabbed the offcut from the floor and threw it on the scrap pile, not worrying about the saw tipping because the rail wad secured. So when I switched over to this other series of cuts, but this time without the rail clamps, my body repeated the motione of earlier in the day -- and when I returned the saw to the front of the first cut I watched as saw and rail tipped back and smashes onto the concrete floor of my shop.

Cracked the baseplate completely. Saw was still under Warranty though, and though I told festool service exactly what had gone down, in the end was only charged cost of new baseplate.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2706
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2019, 11:48 PM »
Here's one for you -

I made a set of base cabinets for an entertainment wall for my daughter.  She had measured the width but didn't check if the side walls were parallel.  I made the cabinets 3/4" narrower thinking I had room for filler strips.  Flat packed and shipped the cabinets for she and her husband to assemble and install. 

Well they were 3/8" too wide.  What to do??!

I drove up to Madison to cut them down.  Had an idea so I loaded up the car with tools and headed north.

Photos show the process - which turned out to be easy and very accurate.  Took 3/4" out of each of two cabinets in the center section and then dominoes and glued them back together.  A little time in the clamps and they were ready for installation.

Track saw with backer boards screwed in underneath each section made the cuts very easy and the domino made quick work of aligning the two halves back together.  I did use the Vectoro for cutting the front kick-plate flush with the bottom shelf cuts.

Two cabinets cut down took about 2 hours including gluing back together.

Install went well.  I did have to remake two sets of doors given they were full overlay and the stiles had been hinge drilled and I wanted them all consistent width.

A measurement miss was reversed with a little Festool help.

Measure twice, cut once.  My daughter now knows that mantra!

neil



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« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 12:05 AM by neilc »

Online Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 132
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2019, 08:43 PM »
I was cutting some lumber I was recycling from another project on my (blue) miter saw. In one cut, near the end of a piece, the saw's pitch changed a bit, and it needed a bit more pressure than usual to finish the cut. Didn't think much about at the time, since the behavior change was only slight. I figured it was going through a knot or similar.
Then when I put the newly-cut piece into place, I noticed the remains of two stainless screws that were neatly flush cut with the end of the wood. [crying] [mad]
The only visible damage I could find on the blade were a few teeth with very slight nicks in them, though the blade doesn't cut as cleanly as it had prior. I still use it occasionally for rough work (but checked more thoroughly for metal).

Yup, done this too.

Online Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 132
Re: Shop goofs
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2019, 08:44 PM »
Here's one for you -

I made a set of base cabinets for an entertainment wall for my daughter.  She had measured the width but didn't check if the side walls were parallel.  I made the cabinets 3/4" narrower thinking I had room for filler strips.  Flat packed and shipped the cabinets for she and her husband to assemble and install. 

Well they were 3/8" too wide.  What to do??!

I drove up to Madison to cut them down.  Had an idea so I loaded up the car with tools and headed north.

Photos show the process - which turned out to be easy and very accurate.  Took 3/4" out of each of two cabinets in the center section and then dominoes and glued them back together.  A little time in the clamps and they were ready for installation.

Track saw with backer boards screwed in underneath each section made the cuts very easy and the domino made quick work of aligning the two halves back together.  I did use the Vectoro for cutting the front kick-plate flush with the bottom shelf cuts.

Two cabinets cut down took about 2 hours including gluing back together.

Install went well.  I did have to remake two sets of doors given they were full overlay and the stiles had been hinge drilled and I wanted them all consistent width.

A measurement miss was reversed with a little Festool help.

Measure twice, cut once.  My daughter now knows that mantra!

neil



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What a good Dad!