Author Topic: What's Cooking  (Read 59293 times)

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Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #330 on: December 07, 2018, 12:49 AM »
And harkening back even further, here's the local selection of Akaushi beef. The rib eyes are to die for but the flank steak is the most tender and flavorful I've ever had. Also check out the marbling in the New York strips.


Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #331 on: December 07, 2018, 12:53 AM »
Oxtail bourguignon.

Not a fan of ox tails but they do look good, the sauce looks very rich and concentrated.

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #332 on: December 10, 2018, 12:03 PM »
Hoisin Shrimp with Bok Choy, Shiitakes & Peppers:      Simple to make and delicious...healthy too. [cool]

Bok choy first.



Add peppers.



Add shiitakes.



Drizzle on sauce and sesame oil.



Roast @ 450º for 15 minutes.



Add shrimp for additional 5 minutes.



Plate over wide cellophane noodles, add sauce & some fresh basil.





Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #333 on: December 10, 2018, 12:10 PM »
That's an interesting cooking technique.  I'd normally think to always stir fry a dish like that.  Baking in the oven seems really easy and convenient.  I'd never have thought to bake it.

Saturday night we made Gamjatang (Korean Pork Neck Bone Soup).  Sunday morning my wife used the leftover rice to make a fried rice with XO sauce.











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Offline Gregor

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #334 on: December 10, 2018, 03:16 PM »
Hoisin Shrimp ...healthy too.
Only when you skip the shrimp.
In case you want to stay blissful as you want to continue to eat them: don't research how they are farmed.

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #335 on: December 11, 2018, 12:08 AM »
Hoisin Shrimp ...healthy too.
Only when you skip the shrimp.
In case you want to stay blissful as you want to continue to eat them: don't research how they are farmed.

Yea, ain’t that the truth... [scared]

This reminds me of my first year in college when I needed to get a “good paying part time job” to help pay for the expenses. I hired on as a butcher and a smoker for a local sausage maker. One of the perks of the job was that every day I worked, I could go into the coolers and pick any meat product to cook for my dinner/lunch.

Unfortunately, after seeing how these ground meat products in casings were produced, I lost any interest in eating any of them.

It took 4-5 years after I quit before I mustered up the courage to actually, once again, eat a brat or a wiener.  Sometimes it’s just “too much information”.

50+ years later the single mention of “head cheese” still gives me the willy’s.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #336 on: December 15, 2018, 09:18 PM »
Last Sunday we had a bit of a fail with what was supposed to be Hungarian Goulash with Spatzle and Braised Red Cabbage.  The braised red cabbage didn't make it as the cabbage got scourged somehow, the goulash was salty, and the spatzle didn't come out that nicely using a ricer (last time I squeezed it out of a ziploc and cut it with a knife).  It's a shame since the same meal was a real success back in April.













Tuesday I may Fettucine Alfredo with chicken.













Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).











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Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #337 on: December 15, 2018, 09:57 PM »
This meal is totally out of my expertise, but I’d think @six-point socket II will weigh in and make some sense out of the mayhem.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #338 on: December 15, 2018, 10:15 PM »
Here are the pictures from when we made it back in April.









We used the same recipe for the goulash, but I don't remember what technique or recipe we used for the braised cabbage.  Neither of the 2 recipes for red cabbage that I had in my browser history look like what we used, at least from a recipe/technique perspective.

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Offline Tinker

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #339 on: December 16, 2018, 03:36 AM »
Last Sunday we had a bit of a fail with what was supposed to be Hungarian Goulash with Spatzle and Braised Red Cabbage.  The braised red cabbage didn't make it as the cabbage got scourged somehow, the goulash was salty, and the spatzle didn't come out that nicely using a ricer (last time I squeezed it out of a ziploc and cut it with a knife).  It's a shame since the same meal was a real success back in April.

When we first married, my wife had not previously done a lot of cooking. But shows game to learn. The first few dishes she tried were German meals. She first tried making Goulash with Spatzle. I liked her result. We have  had variations of the meal over the years.

Next, she included kartuffleclaisse (sp?) with a meal. Those came out teriffic as far as I was concerned. She was not satisfied. "They didn't hold together" was her complaint. She has since learned how to get them to "hang together" as she wanted.  However, whatever she uses to get them to stay solid, as she expects, has  not anything towards improving flavor. They are still good, but not as great to my taste as her very first attempt.

She is still a good cook, but with just the two of us rattling around, she does not have the energy to prepare as she used to do. When we have company, that is her time to shine.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #340 on: December 16, 2018, 09:51 AM »
I rather like the little bundled parcels of green onions floating around.  [smile]

I see the sriracha bottle, do you just add that to the soup like Tabasco?

Because of the browser issues you mention  and my poor memory  [eek] , that's the main reason I decided to go with the Paprika app. I can change quantities, ingredients, add notes, add photos, change serving size, pin different recipes to toggle between them while cooking  and everything is shared and updated between my laptop, iPhone & iPad.

When I go to the store a shopping list comes up on my iPhone. No more paper shopping lists or recipe adjustments scribbled on the back of an envelope.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #341 on: December 16, 2018, 01:56 PM »
The little bundles make for easy removal.

Yup, you can squirt the sriracha directly into the broth.  Some people also like to squirt in Hoisin Sauce.  Others will have a small bowl and squirt in a mix of sriracha and hoisin to dip the meat into it.  I used to put sriracha into the pho broth, that is until I discovered the joy of sate (the chili and oil in the tall jar).  I still squirt sriracha into canned vegetable soup to kick it up a notch.

It's possible that I used a different computer to get the recipe.  We usually print of a hard copy of the recipe for easy reference when cooking.  I'll hand write notes and cross out anything that we omitted or changed.  Sometimes that paper gets wet or splattered and ends up getting trashed without permanently recording the edits that we made to the original recipe.

I do often think about the Paprika app, but the price kinda kills me especially since I think I need to pay for my phone, iPad, and computer separately?  I have started to put some stuff into Evernote, but I don't think it works that well for recipes (better for me for just general lists of things).

This morning we had more pho with some frozen spring rolls, vietnamese iced coffee and my wife had Banh Mi Op La (Vietnamese bread with a fried egg).







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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #342 on: December 17, 2018, 09:48 AM »
Last night we had sous vide ribeye steak, oven roasted asparagus, and Hasselbeck potatoes.  It was rainy outside so I used the Searzall to sear the steak inside without setting off the smoke detector.  I was cursing the Searzall (like I always do) the whole time.  It takes so long to get a mediocre sear at best even with MAP gas.









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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #343 on: December 17, 2018, 10:31 AM »
Hi!

@Cheese not sure I can help, but I'll try. Thanks for "paging" me. :)

@GoingMyWay

Can you tell me what you mean by scourged in regard to the red cabbage? Maybe using another word? I haven't heard that word before, I looked it up in a dictionary and I can't get "whipping" / "plague" and red cabbage together  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Or was that just an auto-correct/typo and you meant scorched? That would make sense. :)

I can translate and post the recipe for red cabbage (with onions and apples) we use, if you like.

Spatzle, well - the dough is basically key, but I think a typical ricer's holes may be to small. We always scrape/shave them when we make them from scratch.

Here's a video (not ours) on how it is done:

(You could do that with Festool's putty knife ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] )

As usual, very great looking meals & dishes! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline zapdafish

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #344 on: December 17, 2018, 10:37 AM »
Lol, are those balls of gluten? 


Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).


« Last Edit: December 17, 2018, 10:40 AM by zapdafish »
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #345 on: December 17, 2018, 11:17 AM »
Hi!

@Cheese not sure I can help, but I'll try. Thanks for "paging" me. :)

@GoingMyWay

Can you tell me what you mean by scourged in regard to the red cabbage? Maybe using another word? I haven't heard that word before, I looked it up in a dictionary and I can't get "whipping" / "plague" and red cabbage together  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Or was that just an auto-correct/typo and you meant scorched? That would make sense. :)

I can translate and post the recipe for red cabbage (with onions and apples) we use, if you like.

Spatzle, well - the dough is basically key, but I think a typical ricer's holes may be to small. We always scrape/shave them when we make them from scratch.

Here's a video (not ours) on how it is done:

(You could do that with Festool's putty knife ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] )

As usual, very great looking meals & dishes! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver

Hi Oliver!

Yes you are correct - I meant to say scorched.  I try to proofread my posts before posting, but I guess I missed that one  :-[.  I think it might have been caused by the combination of factors.   I think I originally cooked in our le crueset dutch oven, whereas this time I used our chicken fryer skillet.  I think last time I also washed the cabbage so there was much more liquid in the pan.  This time I only added sugar and vinegar (along with butter) - I think the sugar is what really caused everything to burn.  Does braised cabbage traditionally have onion and apple in it?  I feel like whenever I've gotten it from a European restaurant it's just cabbage.  I suppose I might not have been able to taste an apple that had cooked down to basically nothing, but I'm pretty sure I would have been able to detect onion.

I think the holes in the ricer are about 1/4".  I think those were the largest holes that I could find in a ricer.  I bought it specifically for trying to press out noodles like this and also to make a Vietnamese rice flour noodle that's similar to udon.  I think the viscosity of the dough/batter really matters if you're going to try to squeeze it out.  Too thin and it just oozes, runs, drips through the holes on its own.  Too thick and it may not be possible to squeeze it through the holes.  The style of the spatzle in your video is interesting.  It's like a thin noodle.  I always thought spatzle was more like orecchiette shaped.  I guess there are different varieties of spatzle - kind like chicken and dumplings, some use a drop biscuit while other versions have more like a rolled and cut noodle.

Lol, are those balls of gluten? 


Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).




Nope those are the pieces of cut up meatball with pieces of tendon in there for added texture.  This particular brand wasn't very good as the overall meatball was rather soft and mushy.  The colors also seems a little lighter than normal.  It's usually a little more firmer and chewy.
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Offline Tinker

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #346 on: December 17, 2018, 11:35 AM »
quote >>>I guess there are different varieties of spatzle - kind like chicken and dumplings, some use a drop biscuit while other versions have more like a rolled and cut noodle. <<<

My wife's spatzle is more like the "rolled and cut noodle."
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #347 on: December 17, 2018, 11:54 AM »
I do often think about the Paprika app, but the price kinda kills me especially since I think I need to pay for my phone, iPad, and computer separately?  I have started to put some stuff into Evernote, but I don't think it works that well for recipes (better for me for just general lists of things).

This morning we had more pho with some frozen spring rolls, vietnamese iced coffee and my wife had Banh Mi Op La (Vietnamese bread with a fried egg).

I believe the Paprika app is $5 and the same app can be used on both the iPhone & iPad. That's how I started out. The iPad for cooking meals because it's easier to read and the iPhone for the shopping list. Try it on your iPhone and see how you like it. It's only a $5 hit if it doesn't work for you. [smile]

Then after about a year I decided to add the MacBook to the list. That's a $25 hit. The lap top is nice to easily add original home brewed recipes because of the keyboard.

The Vietnamese iced coffee looks delicious...

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #348 on: December 17, 2018, 12:04 PM »
Oh.  The problem is I have an Android Phone and iPad plus a Macbook and Windows desktop and Window laptop.

I bought the frozen version of the iced coffee from Lees.  I think they're fairly popular on the West Coast.



It's pretty expensive (I wanna say like $40 for 6 bottles), but it really is the best in my opinion.  The iced coffee can be hit or miss at a lot of Vietnamese restaurants - too strong, too bitter, too sweet.
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #349 on: December 17, 2018, 03:22 PM »
It didn't seem like a lot of people drink Coors Light, but I thought I'd throw out this PSA anyway.  Evidently there is a known issue with Coors Light cans not opening properly.

This last 24 pack had several cans that failed to pop open.  Sadly I lost these 2 cans as I didn't have anything to open it with.



I think I've lost 3-4 cans in total that I wasn't able to open.  There have been many many more that required using the end of a butter knife to pop open.  Pretty annoying!

I finally noticed there was a pattern of the cans not opening so I called MolsonCoors this morning to report/complain.  They acknowledged there is a problem with some of their distributors and they are collecting the information off of the cans to help identify batches/distributors that have problems.  I gave them the information (I never realized there were so many different numeric codes on the can before!) off of one of my defective cans and they're going to send me a check for the trouble.

I just thought I'd share this with in case anyone else runs into a similar experience.  You should report it and hopefully get a little money back for the inconvenience.
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Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #350 on: December 25, 2018, 09:08 PM »
For Christmas dinner I made rotisserie reverse seared prime rib with baked potatoes, corn, asparagus, popovers, and spinach salad from Costco.

We had frozen cherry pie ala mode for dessert.























Merry Christmas everyone!

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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #351 on: December 27, 2018, 02:14 PM »
Hi!

Christmas eve. Traditionally we had oxtail soup and smoked fish with bread. (Eel, salmon (different types), trout)







Christmas.

Traditionally we would have made venison filet, lukewarm pears with cranberries and potato croquettes. The truth: We couldn't stand it anymore. Year after year, and our source for really good venison filet vanished a couple of years ago ... So what else?

We thought of a dish my grandmother loved and made for special occasions: Sole - Norman style. The recipe was found in her old cook book and off we went.

Preparing the duchess potatoes: (We did this in advance and kept them in the freezer until needed)



Sole, Norman style.













Starter: Carpaccio.



Sole, Norman style.



2nd Christmas Day - Main course: Duck filled with apples and oranges, red cabbage (with apples and onions) and bread dumplings. Starter: Scampi with puff pastry and mushroom/shallots cream sauce.

















Starter.



Main course.





We drank mostly white wines: German pinot blanc (Palatinate) Weißburgunder No.1 2017 Dr. Deinhard (steel tank fermentation division of Von Winning Winery)  on Christmas eve, Ravenswood (California) Chardonnay 2016 Vintners Blend on Christmas Day and Georg Mosbacher Riesling (Palatinate) on 2nd Christmas Day.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #352 on: December 29, 2018, 03:47 PM »
Everyday I'm pestling ... ;) ;) ;)

Preparation of the goose legs - for confit goose legs. These will marinade over night, go into the oven tomorrow (Sunday) for 8 hrs at 80° C (completely covered in sunflower oil) - after cooling down enough they go into the fridge until Monday, New Years Eve. Then they will be carefully heated, and then grilled.







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #353 on: December 30, 2018, 08:18 AM »
Hi Oliver,

You had quite a feast for Christmas, looked amazing!

Do you usually eat Goose for New Year's Eve?

Do other people have any New Year's Eve/Day food traditions?  We don't, but we usually try to eat something "fancy" on New Year's Eve.  I reckon you're actually supposed to be eating the "special food" on New Year's Day itself if you expect to have good luck or prosperity for the rest of the year.
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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #354 on: December 30, 2018, 09:24 AM »
Thanks! :)

Usually we would do Fondue or Swiss Raclette (Big block of Swiss cheese in a special holder with heat source and then scrape the molten cheese ...) Personally I'm not exactly a big fan of Raclette, and always the same setup for Fondue gets old too ...

So we decided to make the goose legs, it's been some time since the last time.

Honestly, the freezer is stocked with "good stuff" - so we will find something for New Years Day as well - don't ask me right now what it will be. lol. ;) The more I think of it, maybe venison ragout ...

New Years Eve will be relaxing. We will read, plan a renovation project further, listen to music ... at some point we eat ... listen to some more music and at midnight we'll clink glasses with some Champagne - go outside, greet some neighbors maybe, (maybe because it's highly likely that our direct neighbors are visiting their friends/families as they did the last couple of years) so we'll go a couple of houses down the road, watch a couple of people going crazy with fireworks painting beautiful effects in the sky ;).

We return, I will stay up a little longer and watch a James Bond movie while smoking a cigar and emptying that bottle of Champagne. ... When I finished the movie, I grab my Surefire from my pocket and go all the way around the house(s) into the backyard and back - to make sure theres no fire caused by some fireworks on sheds, waste bins i.e. By then it will be around 2:30/3:00 AM and I fall into bed.

We have breakfast at +- 10:00 AM on New Years Day and it will be just as relaxing + some cooking. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #355 on: December 30, 2018, 10:40 AM »
Man oh man...you guy's have been busy cooking. [smile]

The sole Norman style and the duchess potatoes look great. So does the scampi with the shallot, mushroom cream sauce. I'm familiar with the Ravenswood chard as my wife loves chards of all styles.

And then there's the prime rib with the cherry pie...yum, yum. The last time I cooked prime rib for Christmas, the 13 year old grandson refused to eat it and wanted a peanut butter sandwich instead.  [eek]

Better yet, when I directed him to the loaf of French bread and the fresh peanut butter kept in the fridge, he informed me he liked "regular" white bread with Skippy peanut butter.

Hmmmmm, a 13 year old gourmet chef in the offing.  [big grin]

A New Years eve tradition for us is surf and turf. Something you wouldn't normally eat. Originally it was lobster and tenderloin, then it segued to large U10 sea scallops and tenderloin. Currently we've been at the crab legs and tenderloin stage for the last several years. As far as a vegetable and salad go, it's whatever sounds good at the time.

Thinking ahead, this year maybe just a caesar salad and green beans with lemon & thyme.   [smile]
 

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #356 on: December 30, 2018, 04:15 PM »
Advertisement (Due to visible Klein Tools ...)

Roughly one hour in ...



After 8 hrs. :) Now cooling down, then fridge - and tomorrow: tempering + grill.





Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: December 30, 2018, 04:26 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online Cheese

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Re: What's Cooking: Akaushi Tenderloin with your choice of a vegetable.
« Reply #357 on: December 30, 2018, 11:08 PM »
So the latest is “Hers” with green beans at the medium level.

And “His” with baked potatoes at the medium rare level.

The interesting thing is that all of these carmelizeing marks are produced with a Le Creuset cast iron grill pan on a gas range.

Looks good...tastes good.

Not the same as being grilled, but better than being boiled.  [big grin]
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:15 AM by Cheese »

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #358 on: December 31, 2018, 11:56 AM »
Not the same as being grilled, but better than being boiled.  [big grin]

That looked good!

How about "boil in bag" as my friend refers to sous vide cooking  8)?

Last night I tried making Neapolitan style pizza. I made 1 pizza in a 550 degree oven on a pizza stone and I tried 1 pizza on a pizza stone on the grill. I'd say the grill was a complete fail. The one made inside the oven turned out very well.

I heated the grill pizza stone directly over the vortex. That got the pizza stone surface above 716 degrees (max temperature on my infrared thermometer).  What I completely neglected to think about was the ambient temperature in the rest of the grill.   It wasn't nearly hot enough and that resulted in the bottom being completely scorched on the bottom and the top being very pale so we put it back into the oven to brown the top a little more.




























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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: What's Cooking
« Reply #359 on: December 31, 2018, 07:35 PM »
I have never had success with pizza on the grill using a stone.  Even when using my Bubba Keg (poor man's version of an egg).  For grilled pizza I use basically this recipe and technique:  https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/

For pizza in the oven I use Chef John's Wolfgang Puck recipe that I think was referenced here before.  We don't get as perfect a crust but we prefer more sauce and MORE CHEESE.  And other stuff.

Peter