Author Topic: Why some manufacturers are successful in selling their new products  (Read 1263 times)

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Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1191
because they release them with video(s) demonstrating their key features or applications. Examples include Woodpeckers and Fastcap.

Recently I came across for the first time two product videos from Fastcap (released in the last couple of years) which immediately convinced me that I should have them. If I were reading only their product descriptions, I might not have ordered them. Sometimes, seeing is indeed believing.



Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3717
I a product add does not have a vid to display its use, there is always You Tube
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1191
The Youtube route is, of course, an alternative, but it is passive, often weeks and more likely months late after the product launch. The merchant can't control how good or bad the product is used (or misused) or presented, and misinformed decisions could be made by potential buyers.

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6080
So true, I can not believe how bad some companies make their visual presentation.

If I shop online for something, I want PICTURES, loads and loads of pictures from afar and close up, in every conceivable angle and position. But only a few companies do that. Others are content posting a single stamp. Suffice it to say, I know who gets my hard earned dough.

A good video can also do wonders, but then I mean a video that's to the point, not some dude just talking and talking with the product on a bench in the background. And please, no music that's so over the top that the whole neighbourhood can't sleep the next 5 days. I'm talking to you, Festool.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 561
So true, I can not believe how bad some companies make their visual presentation.

If I shop online for something, I want PICTURES, loads and loads of pictures from afar and close up, in every conceivable angle and position. But only a few companies do that. Others are content posting a single stamp. Suffice it to say, I know who gets my hard earned dough.

A good video can also do wonders, but then I mean a video that's to the point, not some dude just talking and talking with the product on a bench in the background. And please, no music that's so over the top that the whole neighbourhood can't sleep the next 5 days. I'm talking to you, Festool.

All add "give us information".   I don't need a sales pitch, show me pictures, show me documentation,  dimensions of the product, interface information, etc.  A nice clean standardized PDF spec sheet. 

A fancy computer rendering of a part is near worthless. Show the real product, show what comes with it, how it works, what works with it, what it does. 

Videos can be nice, but I can't print out a video, I can't really archive it for later study very easy, I can't plug the info into a spread sheet.  Useful yes, but if one needs a video, it's a sign they have probably all ready made mistakes describing/explaining the product.

If your telling me how wonderful your product is, and bashing alternative, or talking about proprietary/patents, and making lots of claims, I'm just going to keep walking.  Give proper supportable data/numbers and you are on the right path.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3717
A lot of You Tube presentations are done by "amateurs" with little experience. Just like a lot of DIY shows on TV make lots of mistooks from wood B pros. I want to see, not only real time pros working, but see the mistakes that are inherent from those who are newbies. Those are the mistook I might be making. Some of the demonstrators show their own mistooks and the correct methods as well. All are beneficial when looking over a new tool on the market.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker