Author Topic: The lengths some will go to add two inches  (Read 2392 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ryanjg117

  • Posts: 176
The lengths some will go to add two inches
« on: May 05, 2019, 05:03 AM »
I recently installed a Clearvue CV1800 cyclone in my shop and ceiling mounting 6" duct runs. That big project is now complete, but I didn't really account for all of the time it would take to adapt my tools to accept 6" flex duct. I enjoy older machines, but sadly dust collection was an afterthought. Some machines are easier to "upgrade" than others, like my DJ-20, shown below. For this jointer, all I had to do was model a 6" dust port and ask a friend to print it on his 3D printer.


Easy enough, look good, works good.


On to the planer. This is a Woodmaster W-718. A great machine featuring a removeable, heavy gauge sheet metal dust shroud.


Here is a view of the shroud alone. If I screw up this project, I can always buy a replacement from Woodmaster for a measly $140.


Sourcing this tube was a challenge. Initially, I purchased some 16 gauge sheet metal and attempted to bend it into a perfect cylinder with no actual metalworking or rolling tools - total failure. Next, I went on the hunt for something I could buy. I discovered it's not easy to find large diameter, thin wall metal tubing. I wanted something much thicker than your standard HVAC ducts, but not ridiculously heavy and large 1/4" thickness available from my local metal supplier. Finally, I discovered a product called ERW Tube, or electronic resistance welded tube. Available in 6" diameter with 14 gauge thickness. A little on the heavier side, but it will work just fine for this project. Here you can see me mocking it up on the dust shroud.


The shroud was not really designed for a exit port this large, so I had to be creative. Tilting the tube at an angle like this would allow it to fit, but result in some challenging geometry to cut and weld.


I didn't have a tool that could accurately scribe that cutting line, so I decided I would model it in CAD and print out some templates. Here, I took rough dimensions of the critical dimensions of the dust shroud.


And here's a quick and dirty assembly I made in CAD, showing the two models merged. Here, you can see the challenging geometry I was eluding to earlier.


Here's a side view.


I used a cavity command to then subtract the shroud part from the cylinder part, which resulted in this part.


Then, I did some trickeration to convert it to a sheet metal part and flatten it, providing me a pattern I could use as a template for cutting.


Printed the template. I was lucky to have a printer capable of printing 13x19" sheets - the drawing was almost too large. I had to be careful to make sure I didn't scale the art at any time here, printing 1:1.


After cutting the template, I wrapped it around the tube. A little short, but precise enough for this project.


After using the template to sketch my cut lines, I went at it with a grinder and made my rough cuts to the tube.


Here you can see me cleaning up the edges and coping them at the angle necessary for good fitment. My new favorite tool: die grinder with a quality carbide burr set. Makes quick work of cleaning up these edges and its milky smooth and satisfying to use, until you realize half of your shop is now covered in small metal shavings. Wishing I had worn a doo rag here.


Quick test of the fitment on the dust shroud.


Another shot of the rough fitment.


Not perfect. Pretty good, certainly good enough to weld.


Nextup, cut the dust shroud. Here, I sketched the outline of the tube onto the dust shroud.


Here you can see my outline.


Cutting the shroud. I cut slightly inside my line, all around, to provide the tube something to "sit" on.


Cutting complete.


Cleaned up and coped the edges with a grinder and die grinder with carbide burr.


Testing the fit with both parts almost ready to be welded.


Another shot of the test fit.


For this project, I'll be TIG welding on my new-to-me Thermal Arc ProWave 185TSW.


Ground clamped and ready to be welded.


Tacked in place.


My best looking weld of the day.


Yeah, still perfecting my TIG welding technique. Lots of stops and starts here as my torch and part ended up getting pretty hot.


All welded up.


Functional, if not beautiful.


Painted in flat black and ready to be installed.


On the machine.


Side view, installed.


Ready to suck chips.

And so concludes my post on a woodworking forum, featuring no actual woodworking.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 05:16 AM by ryanjg117 »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3885
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2019, 05:40 AM »
I thoroughly enjoyed the geometry clinic...thanks for posting!
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1292
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2019, 06:51 AM »
Nice job fitting that 6" tube to the shroud. Did you consider squashing the tube to the width of the shroud then saddle it on to the top?

Do a search on BigPrint app by Matthias Wandel. With it you can print larger patterns to multiple sheets of smaller paper. didn't need it this time but maybe for future projects. He has a few YT videos showing uses for the app too.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline jimbo51

  • Posts: 464
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2019, 08:14 AM »
So, welding is the answer! I can't wait for the infomercials.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 814
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2019, 10:04 AM »
Hi Ryan

Nice work with the metal fabrication and welding.  If you get a chance, let us know your thoughts on the Woodmaster.  I’m considering the 718 and will be ready to order later this summer.

My grandfather had a very early version of Woodmaster 12” planer (early 80’s?) which I inherited. It was a well-built machine but sadly I ended up trading it away for other tools I needed more at the time. In retrospect, I wish I hadn’t done that [crying]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6460
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2019, 10:32 AM »
Real nice job Ryan...good pattern process.  [big grin]

Curious what tool you used to remove the original section of the hood with all those curves?

I stumbled upon Nordfab ducting when I was putting in the range hood.

https://www.ductingsystems.com/?keyword=nordfab&matchtype=e&device=c&adposition=1t1&creative=173244921810&network=g&campaignid=694872&adgroupid=1577861109&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-9r7_9KE4gIVBI9bCh2mQAr2EAAYASAAEgKC-fD_BwE

« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 11:06 AM by Cheese »

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12038
  • MacGyver - My boy 2010 - 2019 RIP
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2019, 10:58 AM »
@ryanjg117 GREAT POST!

And great use of resizing images to get them all in one post!  Love the effort and appreciate the time spent.

Now we want more.....

Peter

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6111
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2019, 12:16 PM »
Nicely done, looks very professional. Only the weld is bit ugly.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4222
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2019, 12:24 PM »
@ryanjg117 Fantastic ic job! Wish I was that capable with cad, but didn’t you post some beautifully rendered models of Systainers about 2 years ago? If so, you work shown here is not surprising. [not worthy]

@Rob Z. I just put my early eighties 12” Woodmaster in storage (free) because I have to give up some shop space and it takes up a lot more space than my lunchbox planer which produces as nice a finish in smaller bites. I will miss that 5hp motor.

Back in the day Woodmaster was the only affordable option (before the lunchbox jobs) because they allowed you to split the cost into many payments and sent the machine after the first payment.

Offline Rob Z

  • Posts: 814
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2019, 12:43 PM »
Michael, I have often wondered what the story was behind how my grandfather got his WM.  He was working at the time in Kansas City MO, and I do recall visiting his office back then. I think it was close to WM, so that might be the connection. Or, maybe he sold material for their facility (he was in the lumber business).  In any case, I would enjoy a picture of your early 80's model if you ever get around to snapping a photo.

As for dust collection, I was the dust collection.  After we finished planing lumber, Grandpa would just point at the broom and say "young Bob, take care of the mess on the floor".  [big grin]

Offline ryanjg117

  • Posts: 176
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2019, 06:16 PM »
Curious what tool you used to remove the original section of the hood with all those curves?

I used a small little Proxxon Dremel-style tool and small cutting wheel. Finer control and ability to get around the curves. The tube was quite a bit thicker metal so I tool a full size angle grinder to that, but first made an initial pass with the Proxxon to get my path established since my pencil marks were fast disappearing.

I stumbled upon Nordfab ducting when I was putting in the range hood.

I wish Nordfab was in my budget. I did price it out and it was 3x more expensive than the 6" S&D ducting I ended up going with. Had to haggle my local plumbing supplier to get me good pricing on the 6" fittings (they were able to match McMaster-Carr). Turned out OK, I suppose the aluminum tape is the ugliest part:





Made my own ceiling and wall hangers with Shaper as well, turned out pretty good:



Pretty happy with how it sucks.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2019, 06:19 PM by ryanjg117 »

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2742
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2019, 07:00 PM »
The hangers look fantastic!  And great work on the metal work and welding too!


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6460
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2019, 11:19 PM »
Thanks for the info Ryan as I knew that 3” abrasive discs would not make that radius. You’re probably using 1” diameter or smaller discs?

Love ❤️...absolutely love ❤️ the hanger brackets. It’s about time that we quit obsessing about the additional time needed to create frivolous design details for functional items and we decided to embellish functional items with a bit of frivolity. What’s the cost.. and every day you look at the bracket and every day you smile. Sweet............

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1292
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2019, 04:34 AM »
As far as thee ugly metal tape on your joints a little Krylon for plastic in white gloss will blend those right in with the pipe.

Nice job in the hangers. They should scale down nicely for 4" and 2" pipe if/where you need them.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline TSO Products

  • Retailer
  • *
  • Posts: 849
    • TSO Products
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2019, 08:26 AM »
@ryanjg117  - your passion shows! - and your innate talent, too!

thanks for taking the time to post and describe in inspiring detail how you went about meeting the challenges in getting your shop operational. For someone very new to metalworking, your fit-up prior to welding is top notch. For a self-taught first-time welder your weld is functional and I salute you for showing it.

Now let's see posts from some of the other FOG "watchers" - don't be intimidated by Ryan's sophisticated approach. Guys like Ryan and Matt Byington can't do all the needed posting to keep the FOG fresh, interesting and helpful!

Hans
TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE  plus TPG Parallel Guide -  the MTR-18 Triangle - TDS-10 Dog Stop and GRC-12 Guide Rail Connector; Work Holding solutions plus AXMINSTER UJK in the USA

Offline ryanjg117

  • Posts: 176
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2019, 04:55 PM »
@ryanjg117  - your passion shows! - and your innate talent, too!

Now let's see posts from some of the other FOG "watchers" - don't be intimidated by Ryan's sophisticated approach. Guys like Ryan and Matt Byington can't do all the needed posting to keep the FOG fresh, interesting and helpful!

Hans

I suppose it's a sophisticated approach for a shop. I enjoy trying to learn new things (welding here being an example) and how I can mix those skills to solve problems. Another example - I'm sweating copper joints for the first time, building the fixed air lines for the shop. My solder joints look about as good as my welds at this point.  [eek] I could have cleaned them up, like the weld, but I like how they tell a little story and in ten years, I'll be able to look back at that and say, "I've come a long way."

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2742
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2019, 06:33 PM »
Grab an old dry rag and wipe down the joint when the solder is wet.  Simple way to improve the look!


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6460
Re: The lengths some will go to add two inches
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2019, 12:59 AM »
Grab an old dry rag and wipe down the joint when the solder is wet.  Simple way to improve the look!

+1

I use it like I’m shining shoes, it produces a minimal width of solder joint.