Author Topic: Walk in closet build  (Read 2303 times)

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Online jarbroen

  • Posts: 147
Walk in closet build
« on: May 08, 2019, 01:56 PM »
So many great sharers on here, I feel like a slacker.  I've been knee deep in a master bath/closet remodel and haven't documented the process at all.
Thought I could start with the closet shelving that I'm building.

Wifey picked walnut as the material so I have lots of solid 1x walnut as well as walnut veneer ply.
The first thing I'm working on is two units of floor to ceiling shelves.  I ripped/sliced some 1x4 on the bandsaw to create some 3/8- x 13/16" edge banding.
Got that glued  and clamped.  My little Makita palm router with trim guide worked okay to level out the edging except where I forgot about the dado dipping.... Now I need to figure out how I'm going to hide a couple of gouges.  Or if I route the dado all the way through the sides and have the shelves protrude 1/4" past the tower sides... I used my OF1400 with rail to route the dados.  Super easy but definitely time consuming.  Can't think of a quicker/easier way to route the edging to match.

I recently aquired a RO150 to do some hardwood floor work.  I was a little afraid to use it on these panels but it seriously cut the time down by a ton!  I had one or two spots where I was a little aggressive and sanded through the plywood veneer.  Hopefully I can cover those with some thinned out putty.
Definitely a learning experience, always.  I've built lots of projects but I'm never an expert at anything that I'm doing. :D
Thanks to the help from here I can at least attempt.

« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 10:54 AM by jarbroen »

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Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5838
  • Festool Baby.....
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 12:08 PM »
Looking good. Looking fwd to seeing the finished product

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 321
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2019, 01:07 PM »
<snip>

My little Makita palm router with trim guide worked okay to level out the edging except where I forgot about the dado dipping....

<snip>

I feel your pain!

Online jarbroen

  • Posts: 147
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2019, 12:34 PM »
I decided to take the time to put the shelves back on the MFT and route the dados through the front edging.  I was mostly avoiding it because of the setup time - lining up the track and squaring each one.  But really, it was worth it.
the shelves poke out through the dado about 1/4" and my wife really likes the detail.

Column in between the shelving units is ducting.  I'm planning on covering that with matching 1/4" ply and will have a freestanding dresser and floating shelves.
Top and bottom of those columns will be trimmed out.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 6450
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2019, 10:25 PM »
I decided to take the time to put the shelves back on the MFT and route the dados through the front edging.  I was mostly avoiding it because of the setup time - lining up the track and squaring each one.  But really, it was worth it.

Yea every time I decided to short-sheet a project, I always got bit. The strong adrenalin rush of progress completion was soon supplanted by the moribund feeling of I could have done better and I was a better craftsman than the results showed.

So I prefer the later rather than the former. Take your time...do it once...and you’ll never have to revisit it.  [big grin]  It’s better for the soul.

Online jarbroen

  • Posts: 147
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2019, 12:11 PM »
Yeah, that's probably my biggest hurdle in any project - not getting in a hurry.  I get super bored/impatient when it gets to tedious or time consuming steps.  I'm looking for the satisfaction of the finished product.
I'm learning though(just really really really slowly) how to stop and take that extra time to get those last little details right.
Reminding myself that spending an extra hour now saves years of disappointment. :)

The other bonus of going slowly is we've evolved the design.  Now I figured a spot for a tip out hamper and got some nice Hafele hardware ordered.  I've also been able to maximize the utilization of the space a bit more.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 6450
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2019, 09:37 AM »
The other bonus of going slowly is we've evolved the design.  Now I figured a spot for a tip out hamper and got some nice Hafele hardware ordered.  I've also been able to maximize the utilization of the space a bit more.

So far so good. I like the projecting shelves.  [big grin]  Well worth the additional effort.

Very clever use of the clamps for the edge banding.  [smile]  The functionality of 16 clamps for the price of 8.

Online jarbroen

  • Posts: 147
Re: Walk in closet build
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2019, 10:51 AM »
Thanks!  I really appreciate the feedback. :)

I'll tell my wife I was frugal with clamps so I should be able to spend that $300+ I saved on some other toys... lol
The biggest reason I clamped like that was to get even pressure along the edging.  I was concerned that the narrow face of the clamps every foot wouldn't do a good enough job.  Plus, the edging had a good bow to it after separating from the larger stock.

Now I have a stack of drawer parts to put together.  I decided to use my Hybrid Pantorouter(HPR) to cut box joints.  It's time consuming, even with the HPR, but I like how the corners lock up.  And I didn't want to use a rabbet or dado to hold the front/back with the 12mm ply I used.

I also got the main dresser cab carcasses put together - just need to grab a picture of those.