Author Topic: Mirka Delta Sander  (Read 1709 times)

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Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 443
Mirka Delta Sander
« on: July 10, 2019, 12:30 AM »
I was about to pull the trigger on a Festool Delta until I saw this new beauty from Mirka.  Yes, Mirka now has it’s own delta sander.  It much lighter than it’s Festool cousin.  It lacks the sanding guard the Festool models have.  The overall design is great and more powerful than the Festool alternatives.

I’m excited to see Mirka has finally released it own delta sander.  The lower profile and lighter body make the Mirka a better option for a wider range of applications. 

Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

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Offline Alex

  • Posts: 6057
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2019, 05:01 AM »
The lower profile and lighter body make the Mirka a better option for a wider range of applications. 

A lower profile is nice, though there's hardly a situation where the DTS doesn't fit, but it does occasionally happen.

But a lighter body? Doesn't sound like a benefit to me. I like how my DTS feels likes solid lump of metal, the mass acts as a counterweight and makes sure the vibrations of the motor are transferred into the material and not your body.

If this new sander is suitable for an even wider range of applications than my DTS, it better serve me breakfast and do my laundry as well.

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 443
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2019, 10:42 AM »
The lower profile and lighter body make the Mirka a better option for a wider range of applications. 

A lower profile is nice, though there's hardly a situation where the DTS doesn't fit, but it does occasionally happen.

But a lighter body? Doesn't sound like a benefit to me. I like how my DTS feels likes solid lump of metal, the mass acts as a counterweight and makes sure the vibrations of the motor are transferred into the material and not your body.

If this new sander is suitable for an even wider range of applications than my DTS, it better serve me breakfast and do my laundry as well.

It’s relatively new.  It’ll take awhile to see some professional reviews.  Mirka is obsessed about reducing vibration.  The Festool and Mirka should be equally good at reduced vibration.

The biggest minus for some people will be the paddle control.  Some users might not like it.
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2280
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2019, 11:03 AM »
For me, the lack of the newer guard feature is a turn-off- Granted, my original DTS didn't have it, but once they DID offer it, I jumped on the newer DTS sander since sneaking around pre-finished surfaces is easier with one of the guards in place when using the DTS.
 As for the Paddle Switch on it, hopefully one doesn't kick the sander on when it's laying on its side if you're changing the paper on it..... I can do that with my EC sanders every once in awhile...... [embarassed] [embarassed]
 OR, I turn off my EC sander with a finger while sanding, and they're not even Paddle style tools..... [big grin]
 Anyway, MIRKA makes great stuff so it's nice to have even more options from them. Wonder what it will cost here in the States?
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 443
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2019, 03:15 AM »
For me, the lack of the newer guard feature is a turn-off- Granted, my original DTS didn't have it, but once they DID offer it, I jumped on the newer DTS sander since sneaking around pre-finished surfaces is easier with one of the guards in place when using the DTS.
 As for the Paddle Switch on it, hopefully one doesn't kick the sander on when it's laying on its side if you're changing the paper on it..... I can do that with my EC sanders every once in awhile...... [embarassed] [embarassed]
 OR, I turn off my EC sander with a finger while sanding, and they're not even Paddle style tools..... [big grin]
 Anyway, MIRKA makes great stuff so it's nice to have even more options from them. Wonder what it will cost here in the States?

I was actually stunned Mirka didn’t make a nose guard for their Delta.  They pretty much nailed every other aspect.  Their sander can get into tighter spaces much easier with the super low profile.   Mirka absolutely nailed everything else.  You’re still stuck having to use a couple of pieces of painters tape to avoid sanding an adjacent surface unintentionally without a guard.
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 954
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2019, 12:24 PM »
Thank you Steven for starting this thread.  I investigated further whether this sander was available here in Canada and did find that Felder Group and Atlas do sell it right now and ordered one from Atlas as they are offering a sweet deal that comes with boxes of assorted Abranet with it.

https://www.atlas-machinery.com/mirka/abrasives/mir-mca-deltanet/

Wish it came in a nice Mirka Sys box with insert like my Deros did though.  Gonna have to outfit my own.  This is a tool I've wanted for a long time.  I'm a bigger fan of Mirka sanders than Festool sanders for the most part.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 314
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2019, 01:45 PM »
Maybe a bit off topic, sorry  [embarassed]

Why these companies don't make one sander with a interchangeable foot, so you have combo of the two DTS/RTS? Is this just more $$$ or is there a technical reason for this?

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 954
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2019, 01:59 PM »
Maybe a bit off topic, sorry  [embarassed]

Why these companies don't make one sander with a interchangeable foot, so you have combo of the two DTS/RTS? Is this just more $$$ or is there a technical reason for this?

I'd say it's like those power tools that come with interchangeable heads.  Yes, the one tool motor body can maybe perform a lot of different tasks OK with different attachment heads, but not as well as a single body tool dedicated to the task. 

I find drills very much like this.  I don't like combo purpose drills any longer either for that reason.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 314
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2019, 02:31 PM »
Maybe a bit off topic, sorry  [embarassed]

Why these companies don't make one sander with a interchangeable foot, so you have combo of the two DTS/RTS? Is this just more $$$ or is there a technical reason for this?

I'd say it's like those power tools that come with interchangeable heads.  Yes, the one tool motor body can maybe perform a lot of different tasks OK with different attachment heads, but not as well as a single body tool dedicated to the task. 

I find drills very much like this.  I don't like combo purpose drills any longer either for that reason.
Well a CAPEX would get pretty expensive !

Silly me. I thought the movement would be same, just the shape of the pad that would change.


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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2019, 03:03 PM »
"I thought the movement would be same, just the shape of the pad that would change."

I have often wondered the same. I guess if you drilled down into the parts list you might uncover some difference between the two but what could it be? Why would one shape pad need a different movement pattern than the other?

I bet they would sell more sanders overall if it was a combo tool than they do as individual sanders.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 314
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2019, 03:18 PM »
"I thought the movement would be same, just the shape of the pad that would change."

I have often wondered the same. I guess if you drilled down into the parts list you might uncover some difference between the two but what could it be? Why would one shape pad need a different movement pattern than the other?

I bet they would sell more sanders overall if it was a combo tool than they do as individual sanders.
Yeah. If you look at the RO 90, that’s 2 different pads and 2 different motions. They can do it there, seem more complex, yet for these two it’s not possible


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Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2280
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2019, 04:41 PM »
Maybe a bit off topic, sorry  [embarassed]

Why these companies don't make one sander with a interchangeable foot, so you have combo of the two DTS/RTS? Is this just more $$$ or is there a technical reason for this?
I believe the early versions of the DTS and RTS allowed for just that, as @Alex has commented on in the past here on FOG. At some point, Festool redesigned the tools and you couldn't do that anymore.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 340
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2019, 09:34 PM »
It's a great sander.  I have been using one for a few months now, although mine is actually a "badge engineered" version marketed as a Dutch Delmeq 706540.

https://www.delmeq.com/#

There's a couple of distinct advantages about the Delmeq delta that the others miss.  Firstly, it has a 3mm stroke, making it simultaneously 50% more aggressive than the little Festool 400, yet much smoother in operation too.  Secondly, it misses out on the potentially problematic plug-it type power cords, being fixed permanently.  I've had occasional problems with both Festool's & Mirka's plug-it tool connectors in the past.  I prefer to have a couple (or more) sanders semi-permanently plugged into a power board, merely changing hoses as required.  For intensive use I've also used twin hoses on 2 sanders simultaneously (obviously using only one tool at a time), with the suction upped a bit to compensate for air bleed from the unused sander.

It's not exactly all beer & skittles 'though.  One major disadvantage if the Mirka & its clones (Delmeq, Carsystem, Indasa etc.) is the necessity of keeping the variable speed paddle continuously depressed during operation, making it a little harder to vary one's grip for different sanding orientation (horizontal, vertical, overhead etc).  In longer-term operation a few inches of electrical insulation tape over the paddle circumvents this problem, easily temporarily removed/replaced for short breaks.  It's also necessary to physically switch the sander off when inverting the tool for "paper" exchange, although that's true for ANY sander.

The sander's 3mm stroke makes aggressive sanding with coarser grits (40-60g paper based abrasives) much faster than any other delta I've ever used.  The compact dimensions, esp. the low height of the EC motor & light weight (about 20% less than the alternative) makes it much more versatile (i.e. quicker) and comfortable to use on vertical surfaces & overhead, for plaster corners etc.  Using Abranet abrasives in finer grits (80g+) it also seems much smoother & swirl-free despite the 50% larger orbit.  Why I can't say, but I'm guessing it's down to superior design & ergo's.

I already have 4 other Mirka sanders:  DEROS in 5 & 8mm iterations (never felt the need for the finest 2.5mm orbital one), and DEOS in 81 x 133 & 70 x 198mm pad sizes.  The latter is pretty well redundant for me actually, as the smaller DEOS just feels better, and seems to have a far wider range of paper & mesh abrasives available.  The 70 x 198mm size seems to be more of a dedicated plasterer's detail sander.  Thanks to the multi-hole pattern in all pad sizes & shapes including the Delta platens of the Mirka/Delmeq delta clones you're no longer limited to a single greedy manufacturer's abrasives any more.  Fabulous!  I'd personally recommend using velcro interface pads (although it's not absolutely necessary) to prolong the life of the pad's velcro hooks when using mesh abrasives.

At a pinch, if you already have a DEOS 353CV or one of it's clones, you could actually merely purchase a Delta platen, sub-base & dust chamber from either manufacturer (Mirka or Delmeq) to convert the sander from rectangular to delta configuration.  Two sets of 4 (reusable) screws are all that's necessary to change the bases over.  According to the exploded diagrams, the shaft counterweight is the same for the 2 abovementioned sanders, so you won't even need to add an additional balancing counterweight as you do when changing over the DEROS machines from 125-150mm operation.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 09:57 PM by aloysius »
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline VirTERM

  • Posts: 29
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2019, 10:07 PM »
Thank you Steven for starting this thread.  I investigated further whether this sander was available here in Canada and did find that Felder Group and Atlas do sell it right now and ordered one from Atlas as they are offering a sweet deal that comes with boxes of assorted Abranet with it.

https://www.atlas-machinery.com/mirka/abrasives/mir-mca-deltanet/

Wish it came in a nice Mirka Sys box with insert like my Deros did though.  Gonna have to outfit my own.  This is a tool I've wanted for a long time.  I'm a bigger fan of Mirka sanders than Festool sanders for the most part.
I didn't know that Abranet is available in 100x150mm size, this is great news for my DTS400.... ;)

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 954
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2019, 10:16 PM »
I think that Festool offers it now.  I tripped over this in my assessment of getting the Deos and doing some comparisoning.  The last profile here at LV, is this not an Abranet albeit 'a-la-Festool' Abranet maybe?

http://www.leevalley.com/en/Festool/page.aspx?p=68055&cat=5,105,68343
« Last Edit: July 16, 2019, 08:34 AM by Kevin D. »
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 954
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2019, 10:25 PM »
It's a great sander.  I have been using one for a few months now, although mine is actually a "badge engineered" version marketed as a Dutch Delmeq 706540.

https://www.delmeq.com/#

There's a couple of distinct advantages about the Delmeq delta that the others miss.  Firstly, it has a 3mm stroke, making it simultaneously 50% more aggressive than the little Festool 400, yet much smoother in operation too.  Secondly, it misses out on the potentially problematic plug-it type power cords, being fixed permanently.  I've had occasional problems with both Festool's & Mirka's plug-it tool connectors in the past.  I prefer to have a couple (or more) sanders semi-permanently plugged into a power board, merely changing hoses as required.  For intensive use I've also used twin hoses on 2 sanders simultaneously (obviously using only one tool at a time), with the suction upped a bit to compensate for air bleed from the unused sander.

It's not exactly all beer & skittles 'though.  One major disadvantage if the Mirka & its clones (Delmeq, Carsystem, Indasa etc.) is the necessity of keeping the variable speed paddle continuously depressed during operation, making it a little harder to vary one's grip for different sanding orientation (horizontal, vertical, overhead etc).  In longer-term operation a few inches of electrical insulation tape over the paddle circumvents this problem, easily temporarily removed/replaced for short breaks.  It's also necessary to physically switch the sander off when inverting the tool for "paper" exchange, although that's true for ANY sander.

The sander's 3mm stroke makes aggressive sanding with coarser grits (40-60g paper based abrasives) much faster than any other delta I've ever used.  The compact dimensions, esp. the low height of the EC motor & light weight (about 20% less than the alternative) makes it much more versatile (i.e. quicker) and comfortable to use on vertical surfaces & overhead, for plaster corners etc.  Using Abranet abrasives in finer grits (80g+) it also seems much smoother & swirl-free despite the 50% larger orbit.  Why I can't say, but I'm guessing it's down to superior design & ergo's.

I already have 4 other Mirka sanders:  DEROS in 5 & 8mm iterations (never felt the need for the finest 2.5mm orbital one), and DEOS in 81 x 133 & 70 x 198mm pad sizes.  The latter is pretty well redundant for me actually, as the smaller DEOS just feels better, and seems to have a far wider range of paper & mesh abrasives available.  The 70 x 198mm size seems to be more of a dedicated plasterer's detail sander.  Thanks to the multi-hole pattern in all pad sizes & shapes including the Delta platens of the Mirka/Delmeq delta clones you're no longer limited to a single greedy manufacturer's abrasives any more.  Fabulous!  I'd personally recommend using velcro interface pads (although it's not absolutely necessary) to prolong the life of the pad's velcro hooks when using mesh abrasives.

At a pinch, if you already have a DEOS 353CV or one of it's clones, you could actually merely purchase a Delta platen, sub-base & dust chamber from either manufacturer (Mirka or Delmeq) to convert the sander from rectangular to delta configuration.  Two sets of 4 (reusable) screws are all that's necessary to change the bases over.  According to the exploded diagrams, the shaft counterweight is the same for the 2 abovementioned sanders, so you won't even need to add an additional balancing counterweight as you do when changing over the DEROS machines from 125-150mm operation.

Excellent insight.  Thank you so much for posting.  As I suspected, the 3mm orbit versus the 2mm of the Festool was one reason I did spring for the DEOS.  But I didn't realize til you said your comments how much more it increases efficiency in the lower grits.

I had even contemplated getting the 400DTS Festool Delta sander just to compare but with the intent of sending in back in within the 30 days just to see I made the right decision with the DEOS.  I've got easily 30K dollars CAD in Festool stuff, and it would be the first time I would play that game, but mow I won't even bother.

One thing I'd like to hear from you, is how is it without the corner guards that Festool offers on their sander as someone earlier in the thread mentioned is maybe a game changer versus the the DEOS which doesn't offer them?
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 340
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2019, 11:35 PM »
Excellent insight.  Thank you so much for posting.  As I suspected, the 3mm orbit versus the 2mm of the Festool was one reason I did spring for the DEOS.  But I didn't realize til you said your comments how much more it increases efficiency in the lower grits.

I had even contemplated getting the 400DTS Festool Delta sander just to compare but with the intent of sending in back in within the 30 days just to see I made the right decision with the DEOS.  I've got easily 30K dollars CAD in Festool stuff, and it would be the first time I would play that game, but mow I won't even bother.

One thing I'd like to hear from you, is how is it without the corner guards that Festool offers on their sander as someone earlier in the thread mentioned is maybe a game changer versus the the DEOS which doesn't offer them?
[/quote]



Never really used any corner guards myself.  Most of my (albeit old) Festo/ol sanders were never thus equipped.  The only one I can recall is that evil little RO90 Rotex.  Horrible tool.  Couldn't get rid of it fast enough.  Yet, considering its unruly, rough and jumpy nature when in rotary mode, I guess that edge guarding would've been a distinct advantage.

Maybe it's just me, but I've always found that larger platens actually seem to perform their function much more smoothly anyway.  I can take any of the Mirka/Delmeq sanders (carefully) right up to most perpendicular surfaces without actually banging into them.  With smaller platens such as my RO90, Deltex or Bosch GDA 280E, it's much more difficult to handle them with anything like the finesse afforded by the Mirkas & their clones.  I put it down, as previously stated, to a serendipitous combination of attributes: their larger platen size, smooth EC motors, light weight, low profile & superior ergonomics.

My Festool Duplex linear sanders (I had 2) would only start banging on their ends.  But I found these tools to be just too slow in operation (Festool's 80 x 133 hand-pad is actually faster), and terribly prone to prematurely clogging papers to be of much use.  In fact, I've found that most of my other sanders have been made pretty well redundant as a result of now using the Mirkas.

My RS1C has been sold off, as have both Rotexes.  My RO150E (older, pre millenial Festo "Mark II" version) was not measurably better or faster (even in rotary mode) than the 8mm DEROS.  Both my DEROS are also much smoother & swirl free in fine grits (5mm DEROS) than the Rotex ever could be.  Plus they just handle ever so much more comfortably and easily too.  My Festo Deltex just wasn't needed any more either.  It's likewise gone.  Now that Abranet is available in 93mm Delta format, I still use my little Bosch delta for it's remarkably effective range of accessory extension pads, oval & flat adjustable sanding fingers, concave pad accessories etc. for all those infuriatingly fiddly bits.

In fact, apart from the 2 DEROS, one (smaller) DEOS & the Delta Delmeq, the only other sanders I think that I still need are the Bosch mini-delta, a couple of 80mm Metabo SXE400 mini-ROSs, and a big old Holz-Her/Festool BS105E belt sander (thanks to it's marvellous sanding frame).  Even then, I only see the Bosch, Metabos & belt sander being used occasionally & intermittently, & only for specialist & small-scale tasks.  95%+ of my ongoing sanding tasks can be simply, comfortably & efficiently accomplished with the 3 Mirkas & the Delmeq.  Yes, they're THAT good!

Still 8 different sanders I know, but I've still managed to rid myself of 6 redundant Festools, with the larger Mirka DEOS probably due for the chop too.  The advent of mesh abrasives has been a game-changer for me.  Mirka & their clones just seem to make the best use of these remarkable abrasives, plus they're now available in other sizes & shapes (93mm delta, 80mm round, 100 x 620mm belts) for my other sanders too.  I still prefer paper/cloth backed abrasives for the coarsest grits however.

If you're still concerned with the potential for damaging adjacent surfaces, then a Festool extracted hand-pad might just be your answer.  For all the fabulous machine sanders now available, there's still a legitimate and useful place for the hand-pad.  Usefully in the same size format as the smaller DEOS:

https://www.festool.com/products/sanding-and-brushing/hand-sanding-blocks-and-abrasives/496962---hsk-a-80x130
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 11:48 PM by aloysius »
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline Sanderxpander

  • Posts: 368
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2019, 04:01 AM »
Are you saying I could convert my smaller DEOS to a delta using a Mirka purchased base and platen?

Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 340
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2019, 04:36 AM »
Are you saying I could convert my smaller DEOS to a delta using a Mirka purchased base and platen?

Yes.  Check the 2 respective exploded diagrams (from your manual & the website) for the 3 requisite part numbers.
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 443
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2019, 12:40 PM »
It's a great sander.  I have been using one for a few months now, although mine is actually a "badge engineered" version marketed as a Dutch Delmeq 706540.

https://www.delmeq.com/#

There's a couple of distinct advantages about the Delmeq delta that the others miss.  Firstly, it has a 3mm stroke, making it simultaneously 50% more aggressive than the little Festool 400, yet much smoother in operation too.  Secondly, it misses out on the potentially problematic plug-it type power cords, being fixed permanently.  I've had occasional problems with both Festool's & Mirka's plug-it tool connectors in the past.  I prefer to have a couple (or more) sanders semi-permanently plugged into a power board, merely changing hoses as required.  For intensive use I've also used twin hoses on 2 sanders simultaneously (obviously using only one tool at a time), with the suction upped a bit to compensate for air bleed from the unused sander.

It's not exactly all beer & skittles 'though.  One major disadvantage if the Mirka & its clones (Delmeq, Carsystem, Indasa etc.) is the necessity of keeping the variable speed paddle continuously depressed during operation, making it a little harder to vary one's grip for different sanding orientation (horizontal, vertical, overhead etc).  In longer-term operation a few inches of electrical insulation tape over the paddle circumvents this problem, easily temporarily removed/replaced for short breaks.  It's also necessary to physically switch the sander off when inverting the tool for "paper" exchange, although that's true for ANY sander.

The sander's 3mm stroke makes aggressive sanding with coarser grits (40-60g paper based abrasives) much faster than any other delta I've ever used.  The compact dimensions, esp. the low height of the EC motor & light weight (about 20% less than the alternative) makes it much more versatile (i.e. quicker) and comfortable to use on vertical surfaces & overhead, for plaster corners etc.  Using Abranet abrasives in finer grits (80g+) it also seems much smoother & swirl-free despite the 50% larger orbit.  Why I can't say, but I'm guessing it's down to superior design & ergo's.

I already have 4 other Mirka sanders:  DEROS in 5 & 8mm iterations (never felt the need for the finest 2.5mm orbital one), and DEOS in 81 x 133 & 70 x 198mm pad sizes.  The latter is pretty well redundant for me actually, as the smaller DEOS just feels better, and seems to have a far wider range of paper & mesh abrasives available.  The 70 x 198mm size seems to be more of a dedicated plasterer's detail sander.  Thanks to the multi-hole pattern in all pad sizes & shapes including the Delta platens of the Mirka/Delmeq delta clones you're no longer limited to a single greedy manufacturer's abrasives any more.  Fabulous!  I'd personally recommend using velcro interface pads (although it's not absolutely necessary) to prolong the life of the pad's velcro hooks when using mesh abrasives.

At a pinch, if you already have a DEOS 353CV or one of it's clones, you could actually merely purchase a Delta platen, sub-base & dust chamber from either manufacturer (Mirka or Delmeq) to convert the sander from rectangular to delta configuration.  Two sets of 4 (reusable) screws are all that's necessary to change the bases over.  According to the exploded diagrams, the shaft counterweight is the same for the 2 abovementioned sanders, so you won't even need to add an additional balancing counterweight as you do when changing over the DEROS machines from 125-150mm operation.

Excellent insight.  Thank you so much for posting.  As I suspected, the 3mm orbit versus the 2mm of the Festool was one reason I did spring for the DEOS.  But I didn't realize til you said your comments how much more it increases efficiency in the lower grits.

I had even contemplated getting the 400DTS Festool Delta sander just to compare but with the intent of sending in back in within the 30 days just to see I made the right decision with the DEOS.  I've got easily 30K dollars CAD in Festool stuff, and it would be the first time I would play that game, but mow I won't even bother.

One thing I'd like to hear from you, is how is it without the corner guards that Festool offers on their sander as someone earlier in the thread mentioned is maybe a game changer versus the the DEOS which doesn't offer them?

I usually overcome the lack of a corner guard by using electrical tape to protect adjacent surfaces.  Most Delta’s don’t have an edge guard.  It’s possible Festool might have a patent preventing other companies from adding an edge guard to their delta sanders.   
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Sanderxpander

  • Posts: 368
Re: Mirka Delta Sander
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2019, 03:22 AM »
Are you saying I could convert my smaller DEOS to a delta using a Mirka purchased base and platen?
Excellent, I'll check with my supplier! Thanks for the tip!

Yes.  Check the 2 respective exploded diagrams (from your manual & the website) for the 3 requisite part numbers.