Author Topic: Table Saw Recommendations  (Read 2767 times)

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Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Table Saw Recommendations
« on: July 10, 2019, 09:18 PM »
I need some table saw recommendations to fit my current situation.  My main mode of getting around is via wheelchair and I cannot stand at this point, so I need something where the table surface is about 30" (~760 mm) off the floor.  I'm thinking one of those job site table saws.  I can build a short cabinet for it to sit on which will elevate it enough but not too much.  I can lock my chair then push material through it.  I expect to be able to build some sleds and jigs to do crosscuts and some joinery.  I'm currently leaning towards either the Bosch 4100 or the DeWalt 7491.  Both saws have a nice right side rip capacity of 25 or more inches and can spin an 8" dado stack up to 13/16" thick.  Both of these things are the two biggest abilities the saw I purchase must have other than the table height.

I'm open to other suggestions as well as ideas, but to avoid dealing with BS:

1. Prior to being in the wheelchair I did construction work, built furniture, and made little craftsy things for almost 30 years.

2. I'll have assistance moving sheet goods around and have infeed/outfeed support rollers. 

3. I don't think using my TS55 for wide/long cuts will work at all as my hands are occupied with the saw and won't be able to push my chair. 

4. I have a Grizzly 690, but it will be unused for the time being as it's down in my basement where I built my shop.  At this time I'm not going to spend the money to modify my house to get me in my chair down there and I'm not bring it up to my garage.

5. I've spent the last 6 months fine tuning my hand skills.  I really do not want to go full on neanderthal. 

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Offline TSO Products

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2019, 09:30 PM »
@SonOfMI  - I salute you for refusing to let a wheelchair transportation mode limit you - and for reaching out to the FOG community.
Aside from responses which may turn up in this thread I wonder if you have reached out to other sources of information on this topic. I have flagged this post so I can pass along to you relevant information which I may come across.

Go get'em and show the rest how it's done!

Hans
TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE  plus TPG Parallel Guide -  the MTR-18 Triangle - TDS-10 Dog Stop and GRC-12 Guide Rail Connector; Work Holding solutions plus AXMINSTER UJK in the USA

Offline egmiii

  • Posts: 138
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2019, 10:26 PM »
I’m not sure if your budget will allow for a sliding table saw, but the moderator of the Felder Owners Group uses one from a wheelchair.

Offline miclee15

  • Posts: 54
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2019, 07:41 AM »
I just purchase a Sawstop for safety reasons (please no debates on this).  While researching the Jobsite saw seems to get very good reviews and worth taking a look.    It meets your requirements for dado and rip capacity.

Best of luck
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 02:10 PM by miclee15 »

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2019, 09:47 AM »
I'd second SawStop as a choice.

But, I'd suggest thinking through the safety aspects of using a table saw, even a SawStop.

Kick backs are the main safety exposure in a table saw. I stand off to the side of the wood being cut so a kick back will whiz by me rather than hit me. I also often use two push sticks. One to push the wood through the cut and one to hold the leading edge of the wood down so it doesn't climb up the blade and get ugly. If something looks like it is getting ugly. I hit the paddle switch with my knee and jump off to the side of the saw. None of these actions appears consistent with being in a locked down wheel chair.

I also use the Jessum guides on my saw and my router table. They are great safety items.
Birdhunter

Offline RKA

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2019, 10:25 AM »
I'm trying to picture how I would do this sitting in a chair and it does make me a little uncomfortable.  Mostly it's because you're using your body weight to push down and into the fence at the same time while feeding the material into the blade.  If you have good upper body strength, you can certainly do it, but it is a bit more difficult.  Maybe featherboards would help.  And you need a little more flexibility to lean across the table as you finish the cut.  Both of those speak to how out of shape I am, so maybe it's less of a problem for you. 

Anyway, my first thought, having the Sawstop safety tech might be valuable here in case things go sideways.  But obviously that's a huge expense and it seems like this may be a short term improvisation until you're able to get down to the shop, so maybe it's not worth it.  Then between the Dewalt and Bosch my preference would be the Dewalt because I believe it also has above table dust collection (and I've used their rack and pinion fence before and loved it).

My second thought is how about adding a mini power feeder?  I recall an email from Infinity Tools or MCLS recently where they added one to their lineup.  That might make things easier for you, once your sort out how you'll mount it safely to a jobsite saw.  And it's not nearly as expensive as jumping into the Sawstop while still providing you with a good margin of safety operating the saw from the chair.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 11:16 AM by RKA »
-Raj

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2019, 11:12 AM »
maybe in place of a portable job site saw get a CI top contractors saw or a hybrid and modify the base to lower the table. Contractor saws have had their legs removed and been mounted on mobile carts. You could adjust the cart plans to lower the saw to a suitable height for your needs.

Then get a stock feeder and mount it to the saw to do the work of pushing the workpiece through the blade for you while you are safely off to the side ready to hit the kill switch if necessary.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline RobBob

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2019, 11:22 AM »
A SawStop jobsite saw plus Jessum Clear-Cut table saw guides would be a good way to start, imo. 

However, the clear-cut guides would have to be adapted to fit the jobsite saw's peculiar fence.

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2019, 11:25 AM »
OP, So much of my work on my SawStop and past saws has been, essentially, Above table height where I can see the saw cutting and applying the correct pressure to the wood and push sticks.

I was thinking about building a ramped platform next to the saw that would raise your wheel chair rather than try to lower the saw.
Birdhunter

Offline TSO Products

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2019, 12:38 PM »
friends - anyone have any experience with Minnesota made Safety Speed vertical panel saw!
www.safetyspeed.com  (800) 772-2327

I have seen Cabinet Makers shops in Germany recently who use a saw of that style for precision work but did not take the time to see  what brand they were.

Might be worth a try to get in touch with Safety Speedthem and explain the requirement.

No kick-back - among other advantages, provided there is a precision version available.

Hans
TSOproducts.com

Home of the GRS-16 and GRS-16 PE  plus TPG Parallel Guide -  the MTR-18 Triangle - TDS-10 Dog Stop and GRC-12 Guide Rail Connector; Work Holding solutions plus AXMINSTER UJK in the USA

Offline tallgrass

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2019, 09:47 PM »
what are you planning on making?

Offline ChuckM

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2019, 09:56 PM »
what are you planning on making?
The answer to this question will make a world of difference as to what type of table saw (or if a table saw is the proper machine to get).

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 862
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2019, 10:07 PM »
 I redid a friend's workshop who became wheelchair bound. He makes humidors and jewelry chests. So I changed the working orientation of many of his tools and so forth. Also he got one of those chairs that allows for both sitting and semi standing. Oddly this is the same question most of us should be asking when we build shops. There is more of a challenge in this case. However this individual seems like he is up to the challenge. Which is the most important aspect in my mind.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2019, 11:28 PM »
Good points. More stuff should be accessible. As simply making things becomes easier we could spice it up by making things easier for more people to use.

In the early days of FOG we had a member who made elaborate segmented turnings and fantastic humidors. Can’t remember his name and the pictures from back then have evaporated.

Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2019, 06:09 PM »
Thank you to everyone who has replied.  Most have been a helpful contribution, which is why I came here to start with.  This Festool message board cuts through a lot of the crap I’m used to seeing on other boards plus I feel most here are pretty smart.

Some additional information on myself.  I’m 42, live in Atlanta, and have really good upper body and core strength.  Push ups, pull ups, and different kinds of sit ups are part of my 3 times a day workouts. I wasn’t in this good of shape before I got sick. My upper body is close to 100%, ie - I have full control of my hands, but I can't lift up a 4'x8' sheet of plywood like I could before.  At this point I can easily scoot to the front of my chair and sit up straight without any kind of assistance.  I can also lean over to tie my shoes - also without any kind of assistance. One of you guys is right, this might not be a permanent condition.  In the parallel bars I’m now able to stand and walk 20’.  My medical team can't agree on where I will max out, but I'm not stopping where I'm at.

As for where else I've sought help - I’ve talked with some of the stores around here Rockler, Woodcraft, and Peachtree Woodworking.  I didn’t get any useful ideas out of those interactions.  I haven’t talked with the guys at Highland though and that’s on my list, just have to make the time.  I have talked with some other guys who do woodworking and are wheelchair bound.  They weren’t much help because they’ve abandoned a good portion and just do craftsy stuff on scroll saws and/or turning.  I don’t think I’ll be cruising ATL, doing on site measurements, and building custom closets - for the time being - but I can work on a good chunk of my honey do list and maybe pick up a few contracts.  I've really neglected the honey do list the past few years, so it's time to catch up while I'm making progress physically.  Nothing against people who do craftsy stuff.  I've made a number of band saw boxes and jewelry display cases and will make a few of those for gifts.  The biggest number of things on my honey do list involve cabinetry and storage around the house.  I didn't state this specifically, but I have no plans to really change what I make.  It might be on a smaller scale - a window seat and accompanying base cabinet instead of a window seat, base cabinet, the trim, and a wall of built ins to go along with it. 

I need to keep space in mind.  I’m limited to half of a two car garage, so with space needed for other tools/storage/whatever a sliding saw is out of the question.  A platform that raises me in my chair up could be in play, but isn't all that practical.  I want to avoid it if possible in this situation.  Those platforms take up space if they are permanent and even if it’s not permanently on the floor it will take up space to store and will be something I’d have to move around. It's zero fun to move big things around in my chair.  I still need space for other things such as my jointer, planer, router table, bench, MF Tables, hand tool storage, and material storage. 

I also have a 14" Craftsman bandsaw I'm having my son pull up from my shop this weekend.  It has a max height of 6.5" I think.  I've used that before to make the little craftsy things, but I've picked up some thicker blades with the idea to use it for ripping when I'm not comfortable doing so on the table saw.  I would commonly use my grizzly band saw with a 3/4" blade for rips before, but I'm not asking  him to pull that thing up to the garage.

Safety and technique are very important, now as they were before.  I have a bunch of featherboards, push sticks, and guides from before so I’m set there.  I'm well versed on how/when to use them and consistently used them before so they’re already incorporated into my workflow. I didn’t think of the feed rollers so that’s a great idea - a really great idea actually.  As with a jointer machine, proper technique on the table saw isn’t to use your muscles or body weight to force material down or through.  Fighting material like that is a large commitment.  Such a large commitment removes your ability to be flexible and to respond in much of a positive manner when stuff hits the fan, plus the material can be distorted causing the final results to be off.  Finessing things will get you better results while leaving you in better position to deal with the same stuff when it hits the same fan.

I used above the table dust collection on my Grizzly table saw when I was ripping material or cutting sheet goods on it.  The other things I use a table saw for are sleds of different varieties.  In all these situations I was only on top of the saw for calibration, not for actual execution.  I've done some testing and with being able to scoot forward to the edge of my chair and sit up straight, leaning forward when I have to, as long as the stand I build puts the table height not much above my waist I'll be good.  That's how I derived the measurement for height in my original post.

The SawStop is a possibility, but let me talk you through my thinking.  Their jobsite saw is already sitting over a grand though.  A few hundred more I'm at the contractor saw.  Like their jobsite saw, the contractor saw has a base stand I don't have to use.  I just build my own custom stand a little shorter for the taller contractor saw.  Would I be satisfied with a table top that's all cattywampus like repeatedly found on the contractor saw?  Probably not, so skip the aluminum presssed table attachments and get the cast iron wings for just $300 more.  While I'm at it, might as well as get that awesome T-Glide fence.  That's another couple of hundred bucks which brings the price to $2300.  I'm not sure about that, but it would work easier than their or any other jobsite saw.  I think I saw that Bosch refurbed for $350.  Big price difference there.  Even only a grand more for just the SawStop jobsite saw is a big price difference.  I'm not sure how well that sits with me.  I think the insurance you get from the flesh sensing tech on the sawstops can't have a price tag on it.  So is their jobsite saw that much better than the Bosch or DeWalt I mentioned?

Something else to take into consideration for my situation.  I didn't call this out specifically to start with, but it's really important.  It is much more difficult for me now to lean over and get under/up/into any tool to adjust it/fix it/set it up.  My wife and son are willing to help unbox things, help me put this/that on a stand then bolt it down, help lift a sheet onto a platform, but it's bogue to ask them to help assemble a sliding table saw...or to have them learn how to calibrate a table top to the saw blade.  The more accurate something is out of the box, the better off I am.  That's a huge premium to me at this point.  If I have to monkey around tweaking a rip fence or making the blade parallel with the miter slots, I'll give it some time, but not much before I have my son help box it back up and my wife drive me back to the store to return it. 

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2607
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2019, 06:49 PM »
When I bought my SawStop Industrial, I included setup and adjustment. It was well worth the minimal extra cost. I did the same for an 8” jointer, large bandsaw, and large planer. I am well able to do the assembly and adjustment, but physically moving the big pieces into the shop is beyond my abilities. Also, the delivery team has assembled many SawStop saws and knows all the tricks.

I am a big proponent of SawStop. I was once an engineer and I see my SawStop as an exceptionally well designed and built machine.
Birdhunter

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 350
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2019, 08:04 PM »
I have a Sawstop PCS. Based on my experience with it I would consider Sawstop a premium offering in the Table Saw world. That entails a lot more than just their skin sensing tech. I set mine up myself and very very little tweaking was required. It is a well built saw with top quality fit and finish. I can’t speak to the out of the box fit and finish of the Dewalt and the Bosch but considering the price point and the fact that they are job site saws I can’t imagine that their out of the box accuracy compares with any of the Sawstop offerings, especially the Contractors saw with the T glide fence. Unfortunately, even if I am correct I don’t know how you could quantify that difference since, A. You would not know until you got it and B. As you said, it is a big price difference so it’s a tough one.

Again, I can’t speak to the Dewalt or the Bosch but I do know that the resale ease and price should be quite good on the Sawstop if you are able to get back into the basement as planned. OR, if you buy the Sawstop contractors and you are able to get back down in the basement you might want to sell the Grizzly and keep the Sawstop😊.

Also, one more thing, I have never used a power feeder but I do own Jessem’s TS guides and they are really great. I can see how they would be awesome in your situation. Used in combination with a guard with anti kickback pauls,  they would completely eliminate the issue of a board wanting (or being able) to raise up. This would make the process of pushing a board through the cut SO much easier as no forward downward pressure would need to be applied by the user. I literally push narrow rips through with a 1/2” x 1/2” long stick that is completely flat on the table. All of the downward force is applied by the saw’s guard and the Jessem TS guides. 

Offline mwolczko

  • Posts: 19
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2019, 08:34 PM »
Coming a bit late to this thread: you ruled out the track saw, but if the work and the track are clamped I think you only need one hand for the saw.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3803
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2019, 10:09 AM »
I'm thinking that you might want to compare the price of standard-height tools plus the cost of reducing that height to something that works for you against just the price of standard-height tools alone plus that cost of building a raised floor/platform around those tools that would essentially raise you to a comfortable position relative to the tools, it might be revealing.  Just a thought... 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline ctvader

  • Posts: 61
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2019, 07:09 AM »
You could consider the saw stop contractor saw and make a custom base for the height you need.  You can also upgrade as needed - fence, wings, etc.  BTW - keep kicking  with your walking. 

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3866
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2019, 02:02 PM »

Also, one more thing, I have never used a power feeder but I do own Jessem’s TS guides and they are really great. I can see how they would be awesome in your situation. Used in combination with a guard with anti kickback pauls,  they would completely eliminate the issue of a board wanting (or being able) to raise up. This would make the process of pushing a board through the cut SO much easier as no forward downward pressure would need to be applied by the user. I literally push narrow rips through with a 1/2” x 1/2” long stick that is completely flat on the table. All of the downward force is applied by the saw’s guard and the Jessem TS guides.

I would heartily second that recommendation.  With those guides one can literally pause in the middle of the cut with the saw still running, go to the bathroom/smoke a cigarette/take a phone call, then come back to finish it up.
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Offline tallgrass

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Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2019, 03:13 AM »
First, keep up the PT and we look forward to hearing your progress.

I thought there would be difficulty in the ability to lean over and get under machines. My friend had this problem. This is why we changed the orientation of his tools. Inclining them much like a drafting table. The saw/table is attacked directly to the wall. Giving space for you and the chair so that you can get close. The angle of the table gives you a similar orientation as if you were standing. We used Inca table saw and their machines. The machines were less important than getting correct orientation. We made cardboard mock ups. then found the tools.  Just some thoughts.

Offline nvalinski

  • Posts: 94
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2019, 08:51 AM »
Back on the track saw thread - if you would find something like this useful, you may have the best use case scenario I can think of for Mafell's self powered track saw. But it's more in the price range of a nice industrial cabinet saw.

Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2019, 04:41 PM »
When I bought my SawStop Industrial, I included setup and adjustment. It was well worth the minimal extra cost. I did the same for an 8” jointer, large bandsaw, and large planer. I am well able to do the assembly and adjustment, but physically moving the big pieces into the shop is beyond my abilities. Also, the delivery team has assembled many SawStop saws and knows all the tricks.

I am a big proponent of SawStop. I was once an engineer and I see my SawStop as an exceptionally well designed and built machine.

Did you go through Redmond?  Before all this went down I was looking at replacing the Grizz with a SawStop.  My calendar had me on site for quite awhile then, so I was not going to be in my office or shop.  I was looking for someone to deliver and setup the saw.  Redmond would do that plus remove the Grizz and give me credit on a trade in.  They were the only ones that would deliver and setup that I could find.  I figured Rockler and Woodcraft would not do that.  I was somewhat surprised Peachtree didn't have those services.  I was very surprised Highland didn't.  That's like the only time Highland was even a bit of a letdown.

And yes, SawStop saws are built to very tight tolerances.

Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2019, 04:43 PM »
First, keep up the PT and we look forward to hearing your progress.

I thought there would be difficulty in the ability to lean over and get under machines. My friend had this problem. This is why we changed the orientation of his tools. Inclining them much like a drafting table. The saw/table is attacked directly to the wall. Giving space for you and the chair so that you can get close. The angle of the table gives you a similar orientation as if you were standing. We used Inca table saw and their machines. The machines were less important than getting correct orientation. We made cardboard mock ups. then found the tools.  Just some thoughts.

This is the testing I stated previously but did not get into details on. 

Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2019, 04:54 PM »
Coming a bit late to this thread: you ruled out the track saw, but if the work and the track are clamped I think you only need one hand for the saw.

I don't have an automatic chair, so I have to roll the wheels myself.  I have used just one hand to roll the chair.  It is a very slow process because when just one wheel is rolled, the chair goes in the opposite direction generally.  Example - roll just the left wheel and the chair starts going right.  You'll go in a circle eventually.  Having to stop rolling the left wheel to roll the right wheel and go back and forth can be done, but you can't do it too fast because of the chair's natural tendency to want to go in a circle with just one wheel rolling.  I have gotten strong enough to kind of flick one wheel and have it go straight, but its not very controlled.  I wouldn't feel safe doing either of these things while I had a powered on saw in my other hand, which is why I abandoned this idea.

Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2019, 05:02 PM »
I'm thinking that you might want to compare the price of standard-height tools plus the cost of reducing that height to something that works for you against just the price of standard-height tools alone plus that cost of building a raised floor/platform around those tools that would essentially raise you to a comfortable position relative to the tools, it might be revealing.  Just a thought...

Already been done in some cases.  The best cost to benefit is still a couple of 2x4's and a sheet of 3/4" ply to raise up a jobsite saw a few inches. 

Offline JSlovic

  • Posts: 103
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2019, 11:26 AM »
you might consider looking for an INCA 259 saw.  I've had one for 30+ years and enjoyed using it.  It's not the thing for ripping 4x8 ply but its very precise for intermediate or smaller work. You can easily mount it on a lowered stand for better access.  I got mine from highland woodworking new and they could likely give you more info especially if you speak to Chris or Sharon.

There's a really good Yahoo group that can provide more information on the whole Inca line or PM me for more info.
 

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2019, 12:54 PM »
you might consider looking for an INCA 259 saw.  I've had one for 30+ years and enjoyed using it.  It's not the thing for ripping 4x8 ply but its very precise for intermediate or smaller work. You can easily mount it on a lowered stand for better access.  I got mine from highland woodworking new and they could likely give you more info especially if you speak to Chris or Sharon.

There's a really good Yahoo group that can provide more information on the whole Inca line or PM me for more info.
 

Interesting saw, did you have the mortise on yours? I can see some inspiration for the pantorouter there.

« Last Edit: July 26, 2019, 01:06 PM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2706
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2019, 02:22 PM »
I’ve had an Inca 259 with mortise table for 35 years.  Great saw for precision and a nice compliment to the Festool track saw approach.  You can join the Inca Group in Yahoo groups and they frequently have used ones listed for sale.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/incawoodworking/info


Not sure it would be ideal if you are in a wheelchair however... certainly you could mount it lower to the ground given it is designed for a wooden stand.  But it’s a table tilt, not a blade tilt design.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2019, 02:25 PM by neilc »

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2019, 09:19 AM »
"I don't have an automatic chair, so I have to roll the wheels myself.  I have used just one hand to roll the chair. 
It is a very slow process because when just one wheel is rolled, the chair goes in the opposite direction generally."

I read this and thought "Is there a way to link the two wheels together so force applied to one is transferred to the other wheel?"

Then I thought what about a shaft with a small wheel that contacted each of the chair wheels that could be engaged/disengaged as needed to allow for one-handed operation (patent pending  [smile] ). Sort of like the way you can lock an axle differential so both wheels turn together with no slip.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2019, 09:36 AM by Bob D. »
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

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Offline SonOfMI

  • Posts: 20
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2019, 06:56 PM »
The Bosch 4100 is the winner.  With all of the woodworking stores here plus several Lowes and Home Depot I was able to compare a bunch of DeWalt saws, the Bosch 4100 and the SawStop jobsite as well as contractor saws.  DeWalt has that slick fence, but I could not find a single one that had a flat top.  Every Bosch saw i checked had not only a flat top, but each was also setup spot on for miter slots to blade, miter gauge perpendicular to blade, and fence parallel to blade.  The same can be said for the SawStop saws.  The Bosch saw came with a stand that when it was collapsed and laid on the ground, put the saw at the perfect height for me to work with it.  If ~ 10 display models from DeWalt do not have flat tops, I'm not about to put money on them to have a flat top should I purchase one of their products.  I skipped the SawStop because I just cannot talk myself into dropping at least twice as much on them.  So I printed out a 25% off coupon Harbor Freight emailed me just before I made my decision and picked up a Bosch 4100 from Lowes.  I know Peachtree Woodworking sells Bosch products including the 4100 saw, but they won't accept Harbor Freight coupons plus I've had a hard time buying from them since I spent some time talking with David Keller on his dovetail jig vs Peachtree and their dovetail wiz. 

After I unboxed the saw I found the top to be flat as well as the setup to be spot on.  I was quite impressed.  I've had to make no adjustments to the fence, miter gauge, table, or trunnion.  I can't say the same for my Grizzly.  Assembling the stand was quite entertaining, but I'm still getting used to doing things at a much slower pace.  I've been working on building a base set of jigs I make for my saws then will build one of my custom MFT...with a thanks to Peter Parfitt for the tools to make a super accurate hole pattern and another thanks to TSO Products for selling his stuff on this side of the ocean plus their other super helpful tools.

I am looking into the Jessem guides, but have not made a decision on them just yet as I'm still seeing how they would merge/assist with my work flow. 

Thanks to those who contributed ideas and suggestions.

If you're interested, my therapy has progressed to using a walker which I've taken up pretty well.  So well in fact that I no longer use the parallel bars to stand or walk and I've been walking some at home with the walker.

Offline Alanbach

  • Posts: 350
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2019, 11:32 PM »
Congrats on pulling the trigger on a saw. I know that you will be happy to make some sawdust again! Even bigger congratulations on the progress, that’s fantastic! Keep it up!

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1229
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2019, 07:38 AM »
"If you're interested, my therapy has progressed to using a walker which I've taken up pretty well.  So well in fact that I no longer use the parallel bars to stand or walk and I've been walking some at home with the walker. "

Happy to hear you are making progress in regaining mobility.

When you started this thread I searched through all the digital copies of WWing mags I have and could find nothing that dealt with adapting a shop to deal with mobility issues. So I wrote to Woodsmith and suggested they do some articles on the subject. Their reply was that they have been thinking along those same lines and have something coming in the near future. They didn't say when but at least they are working on it. So maybe some of the others will pick up on it and include articles in their future issues from time to time. Probably wouldn't hurt if others here were to write them (as in any of the Woodworking mags) and suggest they cover the topic.
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1171
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2019, 10:34 AM »
 I have read a few articles on woodworking for or about people with disabilities. Fine Woodworking if my memory is correct. WOOD magazine:

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1171
Re: Table Saw Recommendations
« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2019, 11:24 AM »
Snip.
 plus I've had a hard time buying from them since I spent some time talking with David Keller on his dovetail jig vs Peachtree and their dovetail wiz. 


The PT's cheapo version did have an impact on Keller's sales. The last time I saw them both at the same tradeshow, after demo, quite a number of shoppers took PT's dovetail jigs. I think Keller later also had to release a cheaper option to counter.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2019, 11:26 AM by ChuckM »