Author Topic: Considering all the options to power a small workshop  (Read 4124 times)

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Offline ddb

  • Posts: 17
Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« on: August 29, 2016, 06:46 AM »
Hey guys,

First of all, a big thank you for all the useful information in this forum. It already helped me a lot getting started with woodworking and Festool!

I wanted to check with you if I've considered all my options, or if I'm missing out on something.

I'm in need of some place where I can run my tools (TS55, OF1400, CTL midi, ...) and leave them set up for any period of time. Up untill now, I've done most of my projects in the garden. With the biggest drawback being that you have to get everything inside overnight, and can't work in bad weather. (having a busy life like the rest of us, my free time is expressed in a few hours every now and then, so this is not a good way to get a lot done.)
This  'shop' will be somewhat temporary (about 2 years), untill we sell our current house and buy something bigger.

Recently we purchased a garage box (6m by 2,5m), so ideal to use a small shop. However, it's across the street from our house, in an adjacent block (about 120m away).
It's not connected to the mains, so I can't run my saw or router there :(

Here's my list of things I've come up with to be able to 'set up a small' shop (to compare pricing, I always looked at an output power of 2000W min).
- Running an extension cord from my house is not possible, it's too far, and I'd have to cross two roads while doing so.
- Get it connected to the net (pretty expensive setup fee of 850+Eur and 250Eur taxes per year. And this is not considering any digging they might need to do (because the garage is not adjacent to the road), nor the meters and jumpers etc... So not worth the investment for 2 yr)
- Ask a surroundig neighbour if they're willing to "sell" some electricity (might not be convenient, as they have to be home every time, and also, I don't know these people. Also I wouldn't want to accidently short there circuit or anything whilst using it. So I'd prefer to be independant of someone else)
- I looked into sets with solar panels, batteries and inverters (but veerry expensive given the higher wattage requirement, 5000+ euros from what I found)
- Running an inverter from my car is also no option, as I can't leave it running there for hours on hand (I would be blocking passage)
- battery operated powerbanks. Dewalt has 2 models that run of high voltage batteries and offer 230V output. But its inverted sin only, and they don't last to long before needing to recharge. (mostly the inverted sin is what would keep me from using this)
- I know there's battery operated version of the ts55. But i can't justify getting it, soley to run there. Also, this does not solve running the OF1400.
- Most feasible option seems to be to get myself a good quality honda inverter generator (looking at pure sin only). That Honda 20i model is about 1500Eur. And I think I might be able to sell it after a few years for a decent price.

So my question to you was if I've covered all my options, or if you would have another idea/experience/recommendations to get the Festools running :)

Thanks!

Offline Euclid

  • Posts: 185
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2016, 07:36 AM »
My first thought would have been to see if there's a generator that would be suitable, power and cost-wise.
I suppose if you were running, say, router/dust extraction/lights/music together you'd need something substantial. Would noise be a consideration? Could the genny be outside without causing a disturbance? Less noise often equates to more money in my (limited) experience.

Aside from the resale value, a genny might be useful when first setting up your new/future place.

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 934
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2016, 07:56 AM »
The size of the generator that you are considering is on the small side but with the soft start on the tools you should be OK.

I think that the honda is probably going to struggle to run the CT with the router if you do a substantial cut.

You may need to reduce the suction to not overload the generator.

Offline ddb

  • Posts: 17
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2016, 09:58 AM »
Would noise be a consideration? Could the genny be outside without causing a disturbance?
Well, some noise should be acceptable during daytime, but the quieter the better off course. Not only for myself, but also for the neighborhood. But from what I read, those Honda's should be reasonably quiet?
And yes, it could be outside running without being in the way.
Do you have much experience running these kind of tools from gennies?

You may need to reduce the suction to not overload the generator.
You're absolutely right. But I fear the next model up in that range is getting a bit to heavy to easily carry/transport on my own.

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1378
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2016, 10:31 AM »
Look into a generator that runs on natural gas or LP in a large, refillable tank.

A good HVAC company should be able to help you.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 10:33 AM by RobBob »

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2016, 04:20 PM »
A different place for the workshop, seems to be the other remaining option.

Offline PreferrablyWood

  • Posts: 900
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2016, 05:50 PM »
If have little time to use the shop, maybe consider a space share in an existing building with the necessary hookups already in place. The money you save on not investing in generators etc. might be enough to pay for the rent in such a situation and you could get right to work..
RO 150, 850 HL E Planer rustic head standard head angle fence, MFS 400x2, MFS extensions MFS VB 700 x 1 MFS VB 1000 x 2 . CMS GE, sliding fence, VB and 2x VL extension tables, OF 2200, Accessory Set ZS OF 2200 M,36mm 5m antistatik hose, CMS OF+ CMS TS 75 insert modules. SYS-MFT Fixing-Set,  3.5m sleeved hose, Syslite duo, Sys 4 sort 3 x3, Sys Roll, Sys 1 Box x2 , classic Sys 3-Sort 4, classic Sys 3 Sort 6 x2, Sys Cart x3 Systainer 4 x2  as toolbox with selfmade inserts Systainer 5 as toolbox with insert.
Festool 18V HKC 55 Li 5.2 EB Plus FSK 420,FSK 250, Extra blade for the HKC 55 W32.TI 15, CXS 2.6 Ah version, RO 90 DX, PDC 18/4 plus DC UNI FF depth stop chuck,AD 3/8 square socket holder FF chuck, Centrotec Bits; -->Bit holder and bit selection BHS 65 CE TL 24x, ,Bradpoint DB WOOD CE SET ,Zobo (Forstner) D 15-35 CE-Zobo SET ,Masonary/stone bits DB STONE CE Set,Extender BV 150 CE, Countersink QLS D2-8 CE Hook turner HD D18, end centrotec<--.  TS 75 EBQ, PSC 420, OF 1010, RS 300 EQ, CTL Midi, MFT 3, Parf dogs x2pair +Bench dogs x2pair, FS 1080, FS 1900 .  will get Domino DF 700 XL,  CMS insert BS 120 Belt sander.

Offline Tom Gensmer

  • Posts: 695
  • Residential Remodeler in Minnesota
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2016, 08:06 PM »
For what it's worth, I run my work shop on a pair of Honda EU3000i Handi generators linked up, delivering 5200 watts of power for extended periods of time.

http://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/models/eu3000i-handi

A single generator is usually enough to run a smaller tool and a CT vac. When I am running larger (bench top) tools, multiple vacs, and/or have larger power requirements, I'll link up a second generator. This allows me to scale my power needs.

The 3000i Handi is nice and quiet, delivers pure sine wave power, and is small/light enough for me to pick up and carry around. For reference, this generator is similar in size and weight to a twin tank hot dog air compressor.

Granted, this is not an inexpensive way to go, but I've been VERY happy with the setup.
I hope this helps!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 08:11 PM by Tom Gensmer »
CT-MIDI, C-18, RO-150, RO-90, OF-1010, OF-1400, MFK-700, MFK-700EQ/B, EHL-65, DTS-400, LS-130, MFT/3 (x4), MFT/Kapex (x3), KA 65 Conturo, endless Systainers

Offline roblg3

  • Posts: 751
  • Transforming into a whole new machine
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2016, 11:55 PM »
I just ran for 8-10 hours daily a Dewalt miter saw with the occasional simultaneously run circular saw as well as the sometimes Bosch chipping hammer with a small set of 500W continuous halogen lights off of a Honda ($1000) generator all winter long outside in the snow remodeling a $300,000 swimming pool remodel. I did wind up bringing in a generac 2200w since I needed to run 2 60lb electric jackhammers simultaneously and the hard start of the jackhammer would clip the Honda into protective circuit...the Hondas are uber quiet and would run ev n the 1400 router unless you plan on beating the heck out of and breaking router bits. In my experience
Rob Gardner
Operator
RL3 Enterprises

Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 123
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2016, 03:15 AM »
I have the small Honda generator they make a piggyback cable to run them in tandem. You can start with the single unit and purchase the companion later. I want to say it was about $1,200 USD.

The above poster has the larger genies so that's a better way to go. Remember in both cases your running petrol fuel which gets expensive. They also make diesel generators like Onan that power RV motor homes. That costs more upfront but they are beasts and will run for a very long time.

Have you considered getting a different space with electricity?

Offline ddb

  • Posts: 17
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2016, 03:19 PM »
Look into a generator that runs on natural gas or LP in a large, refillable tank.
Thanks for the lead, from what i found, it seems a really good solutions for big and prolonged use. My use case would be for shorter time periods and more occasional use.

The money you save on not investing in generators etc. might be enough to pay for the rent in such a situation and you could get right to work..
You guys are right, a seperate place also seems like a feasible solution.
So i put excel to some good use, and tried to estimate what that investment and running cost would equal to per month, on a 2 year timeframe.
Considering a monthly runtime of 48h at max output (which would not be the case, but let's count in some margin). The purchase (of just one little gen) and pertrol adds up to just over 3000euros. Which would equate to a renting budget of 125 euros/month.

So the only realistic scenario would indeed be space sharing. I don't know about you, but I wouldn't be keen on leaving my tools in a shared space with some stranger. So it would have to be with someone I know. Guess I know a friend our 2 with a hangar, but don't know if they would be to keen on having me throw up a lot of dust in their place  [big grin]

A single generator is usually enough to run a smaller tool and a CT vac. When I am running larger (bench top) tools, multiple vacs, and/or have larger power requirements, I'll link up a second generator.
...
Granted, this is not an inexpensive way to go, but I've been VERY happy with the setup.
I hope this helps!
At this moment the space limitation also means I do not (yet) have any stationary tools. So I reckon I would only ever run a vac and one tool at a time. As far as lighting goes, I bought a Scangrip Nova 5k light some time ago. Awesome little light with a builtin battery. So I wouldn't need to leave the generator running solely for the lights.
And yes, you sure did help me! Thanks!

I just ran for 8-10 hours daily a Dewalt miter saw with the occasional simultaneously run circular saw as well as the sometimes Bosch chipping hammer with a small set of 500W continuous halogen lights off of a Honda ($1000) generator all winter long outside in the snow...
...The Hondas are uber quiet and would run ev n the 1400 router unless you plan on beating the heck out of and breaking router bits. In my experience
Allright, sweet, that's good to know! Thanks.
And, no, I'm not planning on shredding my router, nor router bits ;-)

I have the small Honda generator they make a piggyback cable to run them in tandem. You can start with the single unit and purchase the companion later. ...

The above poster has the larger genies so that's a better way to go. Remember in both cases your running petrol fuel which gets expensive. They also make diesel generators like Onan that power RV motor homes. That costs more upfront but they are beasts and will run for a very long time.

Have you considered getting a different space with electricity?
Thanks for the information!
That's a very nice feature indeed, to be able to have two of them run together.
I wouldn't need it to run for hours on end, just every now and then to run the vac or a tool.

As far as that other place goes.. Yes, I'd love to get some other place, so I'm taking that in consideration for our next house. Untill then, it seems that my (justifiable) options are to share a place or buy a generator.

Thanks a lot for your help guys!

Online rvieceli

  • Posts: 1056
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2016, 03:56 PM »
@ddb If you decide to go the generator route, be VERY careful with setting it up. The generator spews out carbon monoxide which can easily kill you or others around the generator.

There are usually stories of deaths after storms from people using a generator either indoors (if you can believe it) or set up too close to windows, doors or vent that allow the CO to come inside.

http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/power-outage/safe-generator-use

Offline ddb

  • Posts: 17
Re: Considering all the options to power a small workshop
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2016, 07:38 AM »
@rvieceli Thanks you for linking that page, it contains solid safety advice.
Much appreciated! ;)